Clinical Neuroscience

[Covid-19 associated neurological disorders]

SZÔTS Mónika1, PÉTERFI Anna1, GERÖLY Júlia1, NAGY Ferenc1

NOVEMBER 30, 2020

Clinical Neuroscience - 2020;73(11-12)

DOI: https://doi.org/10.18071/isz.73.0427

Case Reports

[The clinical signs of SARS-CoV-2 infection has become more recognisable in recent times. In addition to common symptoms such as fever, cough, dyspnea, pneumonia and ageusia, less common complications can be identified, including many neurological manifestations. In this paper, we discuss three Covid-19 associated neurological disorders (Case 1: Covid-19 encephalitis, Case 2: Covid-19 organic headache, Case 3: SARS-CoV-2-infection and ischaemic stroke). We emphasize in our multiple case study that during the present pandemic, it is especially important for neurologists to be aware of the nervous system complications of the virus infection, thus saving unnecessary examinations and reducing the frequency of patients’ contact with health care personnel. ]

AFFILIATIONS

  1. Somogy Megyei Kaposi Mór Oktató Kórház, Neurológiai Osztály, Kaposvár

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