Clinical Neuroscience

[Comparative study of digital subtraction angiography and MR-angiography in ischemic stroke of children]

VELKEY Imre1, LOMBAY Béla2

NOVEMBER 20, 1997

Clinical Neuroscience - 1997;50(11-12)

[A report is given on 10 children suffering from ischemic stroke. In all children the ischemic lesions were confirmed by CT scans. The patients underwent both Digital Subtraction Angiography (DSA) and MRA. In five cases of stenotic or occlusive changes the MRA correlated well with DSA findings. However 3 cases of moyamoya disease, 1 case of arterial spasm and 1 case of stenotic change were not shown on MRA. MRA can be a valuable alternative method to DSA in occlusion of major intracerebral arteries.]

AFFILIATIONS

  1. Borsod-Abaúj-Zemplén Megyei Kórház-Rendelőintézet Gyermek-egészségügyi Központ, HIETE II. Gyermekgyógyászati Tanszék, Miskolc
  2. Radiológiai és Izotópdiagnosztikai Intézet, Budapest

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