Clinical Neuroscience

[Combined evoked potentials in co-occuring attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and epilepsy]

MAJOR Zoltán Zsigmond

JULY 20, 2011

Clinical Neuroscience - 2011;64(07-08)

[Background and purpose - Evoked potentials, both stimulus related and event related, show disturbances in attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder and epilepsies, too. This study was designed to evaluate if these potentials are characteristically influenced by the presence of the two diseases, individually, and in the case of co-occurrence. Methods - Fourty children were included, and four groups were formed, control group, ADHD group, epilepsy group and a group with the comorbidity of epilepsy and ADHD. Epilepsy patients were under proper antiepileptic treatment; ADHD patients were free of specific therapy. Brainstem auditory evoked potentials, visual evoked potentials and auditory P300 evaluation were performed. Results - The latency of the P100 and N135 visual evoked potential components was significantly extended by the presence of epilepsy. If ADHD was concomitantly present, this effect was attenuated. Brainstem auditory evoked potential components were prolonged in the presence of the comorbidity, considering the waves elicited in the brainstem. P300 latencies were prolonged by the presence of co-occurring ADHD and epilepsy. Feedback parameters showed overall reduction of the tested cognitive performances in the ADHD group. Conclusion - Disturbances produced by the presence of ADHD-epilepsy comorbidity reveal hypothetically a linked physiopathological path for both diseases, and offers an approach with possible diagnostic importance, combined evoked potential recordings.]

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Clinical Neuroscience

[Recent changes in the paradigm of limbic encephalitis]

ILLÉS Zsolt

[In the recent years, novel antibodies associated with limbic encephalitis have been described, which target such extracellular receptors or proteins that have been already indicated in the pathogenesis of hereditary or degenerative diseases. In a number of cases, where pathogenic role of antibodies generated against the voltage-gated potassium channel (VGKC) had been presumed, antibodies against a trans-synaptic scaffolding protein, LGI1 were indicated. Antibody response against NMDA-receptors has been suggested as a major cause of limbic encephalitis especially in young females, resulting in a typical clinical syndrome sometimes triggered by an ovarian teratoma. Antibodies against other receptors essential in synaptic transmission and plasticity (AMPA and GABAB receptors) have been also indicated, partially elicited by paraneoplastic processes. Such antibodies against surface proteins result in severe but potentially treatable diseases due to reversible internalization of the antigens crosslinked by the bivalent antibodies. In contrast, the rare classical onconeural antibodies reacting with intracellular targets (anti-Hu, anti-Ta/Ma2, anti- CV2/CRMP5) may elicit additional symptoms beside limbic encephalitis and the prognosis of such syndromes is poor.]

Clinical Neuroscience

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Clinical Neuroscience

[Modeling of human movements, neuroprostheses]

LACZKÓ József

[Modeling of human movements became very important as modern methods in informatics and engeniering are available to discern human movement characteristics that were hidden before. The construction of models of neural control and mechanical execution of human movements helps the diagnosis of movement disorders and predicts the outcome of clinical intervention and medical rehabilitation. Here I present methods for recording kinematic and muscle activity patterns. Measurements can be compared with predicted movement patterns based on mathematical models. There are an infinity of different muscle activity patterns or joint rotation patterns to perform a given motor task. I present the main approaches that are used to find such solutions from the infinity of choices that might be employed by the central nervous system. I present a practical application of movement modeling: In rehabilitation of spinal cord injured patients we develop and apply artificially controlled neuroprostheses to generate active cycling lower limb movements in the patients of the National Institute for Medical Rehabilitation.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Extension of polynomial analysis of interstitial I-125 brachytherapy for 48 months]

KOLUMBÁN Zsuzsa, MAJOR Tibor, JULOW Jenő

[Objective - Previously we described from 20 patients’ data with our new “polynomial prediction approach” the volumetrical changes following gliomas I-125 brachytherapy. The aim of this study is to extend the polynomials for 48 months, and to carry out multivarial analysis of several different aspects. Methods - 20 inoperable low-grade gliomas were followed for a 48-month period after I-125 interstitial irradiation. The delivered dose on the tumor surface was 50-60 Gy. Dose planning and image fusion were done with the BrainLab Target 1.19 software, mathematical and statistical computations were carried out with the Matlab numeric computation and visualization software. Volumes of tumor necrosis, reactive zone and edema referred to as “triple ring” were measured on image fused control MRI and planning CT images. The measured volumes were normalized with respect to the reference volumes. Mean values of volumes were determined, then polynomials were fitted to the mean using the polynomial curve fitting method. The accuracy of our results was verified by correlating the predicted data with the measured ones. Results - We have found that the edema reaches its maximum two times after irradiation during the 48 months follow up period. We have shown that small tumors react more rapidly and creating greater volumes of the “triple ring” than bigger ones. Conclusions - The polynomial prediction approach proposed here reveals the dynamics of triple ring for 48 months. The derived polynomials and the multivarial analysis carried out afterwords help to (i) design the best treatment, (ii) follow up the patient's condition and (iii) plan reirradiation if necessary.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Phylo- and ontogenetic aspects of erect posture and walking in developmental neurology]

BERÉNYI Marianne, KATONA Ferenc, CARMEN Sanchez, MANDUJANO Mario

[The group or profile of elementary neuromotor patterns is different from the primitive reflex group which is now called the “primitive reflex profile.” All these elementary neuromotor patterns are characterized by a high degree of organization, persistence, and stereotypy. In many regards, these patterns are predecessors or precursors of from them the specific human motor patterns which appear spontaneously later as crawling, creeping, sitting, and walking with erect posture. On the basis of our experiences it can be stated that the elementary neuromotor patterns can be activated in all neonates and young infants as congenital motor functions. With regards to their main properties and functional forms, the normal patterns can be divided into two main groups: (1) One group is characterized by lifting of the head and complex chains of movements which are directed to the verticalization of the body; (2) The other group is characterized by complex movements directed to locomotion and change of body position. The neuromotor patterns can be activated by placing the human infant in specific body positions that trigger the vestibulospinal and the reticulospinal systems, the archicerebellum and the basal gangliae. Most of these systems display early myelinisation and are functioning very soon. Many of the elementary neuromotor patterns reflect the most important - spontaneously developing - forms of human movements such as sitting upright in space and head elevation crawling and walking. The majority of the human neuromotor patterns are human specific. When the infant is put in an activating position, crawling, sitting up, and walking begin and last as long as the activating position is maintained. Each elementary neuromotor pattern is a repeated, continuous train of complex movements in response to a special activating position. The brainstem is not sufficient to organize these complex movements, the integrity of the basal ganglia is also necessary. Elementary sensorimotor patterns during human ontogenesis reflect phylogenetic develpoment of species specific human functions. During ontogenesis spontaneous motor development gradually arises from these early specific sensorimotor predecessors.. The regular use of the elementary neuromotor patterns for diagnostic puposes has several distinct advantages. The neuromotor patterns have a natural stereotypy in normal infants and, therefore, deflections from this regular pattern may be detected easily, thus, the activation of the elementary neuromotor pattern is a more suitable method for identifying defects in the motor activity of the neonate or young infant than the assessment of the primitive reflexes. The “stiumulus positions,” which activate specific movements according to how the human neonate or young infant is positioned, do not activate such motor patterns in neonate or young primates including apes. The characteristic locomotor pattern in these adult primates, including the apes, is swinging and involves brachiation with an extreme prehensility. This species specific motor activity is reflected in the orangutan and gibbon neonates by an early extensive grasp. However, according to our investigations, no crawling, creeping, elementary walk, or sitting up can be activated in them. Neonates grasp the hair of the mother, a vital function for the survival of the young. In contemporary nonhuman primates including apes, the neonate brain is more mature. Thus, pronounced differences can be observed between early motor ontogenesis in the human and all other primates. The earliest human movements are complex performances rather than simple reflexes. The distinction between primitive reflexes and elementary neuromotor patterns is essential. Primitive reflexes are controlled by the brainstem. All can be activated in primates. These reflexes have short durations and contrary to elementary sensorimotor patterns occur only once in response to one stimulus, e.g., one head drop elicits one abduction-adduction of the upper extremities correlated to adduction and flexion of the lower extremities to a lesser degree with the Moro reflex. Elementary neuromotor patterns are much more complex and most of them including elementary walk may be elicited as early as the 19th-20th gestational week, though less perfectly than later.]

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Management of bone metabolism in epilepsy

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Many systemic problems arise due to the side effects of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) used in epilepsy patients. Among these adverse effects are low bone mineral density and increased fracture risk due to long-term AED use. Although various studies have supported this association with increased risk in recent years, the length of this process has not been precisely defined and there is no clear consensus on bone density scanning, intervals of screening, and the subject of calcium and vitamin D supplementation. In this study, in accordance with the most current recommendations, our applications and data, including the detection of possible bone mineralization disorders, treatment methods, and recommendations to prevent bone mineralization disorders, were evaluated in epilepsy patients who were followed up at our outpatient clinic. It was aimed to draw attention to the significance of management of bone metabolism carried out with appropriate protocols. Epilepsy patients were followed up at the Antalya Training and Research Hospital Department of Neurology, Epilepsy Outpatient Clinic who were at high risk for osteoporosis (use of valproic acid [VPA] and enzyme-inducing drugs, using any AED for over 5 years, and postmenopausal women) and were evaluated using a screening protocol. According to this protocol, a total of 190 patients suspected of osteoporosis risk were retrospectively evaluated. Four patients were excluded from the study due to secondary osteoporosis. Of the 186 patients who were included in the study, 97 (52.2%) were women and 89 (47.8%) were men. Prevalence of low bone mineral density (BMD) was 42%, in which osteoporosis was detected in 11.8% and osteopenia in 30.6% of the patients. Osteoporosis rate was higher at the young age group (18-45) and this difference was statistically significant (p=0.018). There was no significant difference between male and female sexes according to osteoporosis and osteopenia rates. Patients receiving polytherapy had higher osteoporosis rate and lower BMD compared to patients receiving monotherapy. Comparison of separate drug groups according to osteoporosis rate revealed that osteoporosis rate was highest in patient groups using VPA+ carbamazepine (CBZ) (29.4%) and VPA polytherapy (19.4%). Total of osteopenia and osteoporosis, or low BMD, was highest in VPA polytherapy (VPA+ non-enzyme-inducing AED [NEID]) and CBZ polytherapy (CBZ+NEID) groups, with rates of 58.3% and 55.1%, respectively. In addition, there was no significant difference between drug groups according to bone metabolism markers, vitamin D levels, and osteopenia-osteoporosis rates. Assuming bone health will be affected at an early age in epilepsy patients, providing lifestyle and diet recommendations, avoiding polytherapy including VPA and CBZ when possible, and evaluating bone metabolism at regular intervals are actions that should be applied in routine practice.

Clinical Neuroscience

Effects of valproate, carbamazepine and levetiracetam on Tp-e interval, Tp-e/QT and Tp-e/QTc ratio

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Aim - To evaluate P-wave dispersion before and after antiepileptic drug (AED) treatment as well as to investigate the risk of ventricular repolarization using the Tpeak-Tend (Tp-e) interval and Tp-e/QT ratio in patients with epileptic disorder. Methods - A total of 63 patients receiving AED therapy and 35 healthy adults were included. ECG recordings were obtained before and 3 months after anti-epileptic treatment among patients with epilepsy. For both groups, Tp-e and Tp-e/QT ratio were measured using a 12-lead ECG device. Results - Tp-e interval, Tpe/QT and Tp-e/QTc ratios were found to be higher in the patient group than in the control group (p<0.05, for all), while QTmax ratio was significantly lower in the patient group. After 3 months of AED therapy, significant increases in QT max, QTc max, QTcd, Tp-e, Tp-e/QT, and Tp-e/QTc were found among the patients (p<0.05). When the arrhythmic effects of the drugs before and after treatment were compared, especially in the valproic acid group, there were significant increases in Tp-e interval, Tp-e/QT and Tp-e/QTc values after three months of treatment (p<0.05). Carbamazepine and levetiracetam groups were not statistically significant in terms of pre- and post-treatment values. Conclusions - It was concluded that an arrhythmogenic environment may be associated with the disease, and patients who received AED monotherapy may need to be followed up more closely for arrhythmia.

Clinical Neuroscience

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[Epilepsy is one of the most common chronic neurological disease in childhood. Patients with epilepsy – even with so-called benign epilepsy – need medication for years. During this time, children go through a very big change, not only gaining weight and height, but also changing hormonal and metabolic processes. Maturation processes in different brain areas also take place at different rates depending on age. All of these should be considered when preparing a therapeutic plan. In everyday practice after the diagnosis of epilepsy, the applied drug is most often selected based on the shape and type of seizure. However, a number of other factors need to be considered when designing a therapeutic strategy: 1. efficacy (form of epilepsy, type of seizure), 2. age, gender, 3. pharmacological properties of the drug, 4. adverse drug reaction profile, 5. lifestyle (community), figure (skinny, corpulent, obese), 6. other comorbidities (nutrition, behavioral and learning problems, circulatory disorders, kidney or liver disease), 7. expected interactions with other drugs already used, 8. genetics, 9. other aspects (drug registration and prescription rules). The purpose of this article is to help to decide which antiepileptic drugs are expected to have the least side effects in a particular child with different comorbidities and which medications should be avoided if possible.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Epilepsy in coronavirus pandemic]

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[We aim to review the impact of COVID-19 pandemic on epilepsy and epilepsy-care. While the virus has no specific link with epilepsy, it may affect the nervous system both directly and indirectly, leading to seizures in several ways. The hyper-coagulable state occurring with the infection may cause strokes leading to seizures. The infection may first manifest in the form of disturbances of consciousness and behaviour, seizures, and even status epilepticus. The interactions of antiviral/antiepileptic drugs need to be taken into account during treatment. The hypercoagulable state induced by COVID-2 infection may cause stroke, which leads to seizures. The infection can occur also as an impaired consciousness of non-epileptic origin. Interactions of antiviral/antiepileptic drugs have also to be taken into account. The pandemic itself as well as quarantines and social distancing may cause anxiety and insomnia, challenge continuous antiepileptic supply; each one carrying the risk of seizing. Young epilepsy patients with learning disabilities and mental health issues are most vulnerable, justifying their hyper-protection. The danger of infection has highlighted the role of telemedicine. Internet-based video communication may ensure full care for chro­nic patients. Those methods favour bes­­ted patients with higher education. Epilepsy does not increase directly the risk of infection, but its comorbidities may worsen the course of the disease. Brain lesions and hypoxia, stress, insomnia and fever joining the infection increase seizure susceptibility. Because the danger of infection ma­de telemedicine an essential tool of pa­tient care, education and better computer supply for those in need is crucial. ]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Decisional collisions between evidence and experience based medicine in care of people with epilepsy]

RAJNA Péter

[Background – Based on the literature and his long-term clinical practice the author stresses the main collisions of evidence and experience based medicine in the care of people with epilepsy. Purpose – To see, what are the professional decisions of high responsibility in the epilepsy-care, in whose the relevant clinical research is still lacking or does not give a satisfactory basis. Methods – Following the structure of the Hungarian Guideline the author points the critical situations and decisions. He explains also the causes of the dilemmas: the lack or uncertainty of evidences or the difficulty of scientific investigation of the situation. Results – There are some priorities of experience based medicine in the following areas: definition of epilepsy, classification of seizures, etiology – including genetic background –, role of precipitating and provoking factors. These are able to influence the complex diagnosis. In the pharmacotherapy the choice of the first drug and the optimal algorithm as well as the tasks during the care are also depends on personal experiences sometimes contradictory to the official recommendations. Same can occur in the choice of the non-pharmacological treatments and rehabilitation. Discussion and conclusion – Personal professional experiences (and interests of patients) must be obligatory accessories of evidence based attitude, but for achieving the optimal results, in some situations they replace the official recommendations. Therefore it is very important that the problematic patients do meet experts having necessary experiences and also professional responsibility to help in these decisions. ]