Clinical Neuroscience

[Characteristics of gadolinium-enhancement in ischemic stroke]

KENÉZ József1, BARSI Péter1, KULIN Árpád1, NAGY Zoltán2

NOVEMBER 20, 1994

Clinical Neuroscience - 1994;47(11-12)

[Stroke is a clinical diagnosis. In acute stroke, CT is the first examination of choice to exclude hemorrhage. In ischemic stroke, MR detects the changes earlier and more exactly, than CT. Contrast-enhanced MR imaging shows specific enhancement phenomena, viz. Intravasal high signal in the vessels of the ischemic cerebral region, meningeal enhancement, transitorial, mixed type enhancement and parenchymal enhancement. Our paper is deals with the causes and diagnostic significance of the different types of these enhancement effects, and discusses some differential diagnostic conclusions. In the near future, after installing more modern MR equipment, a more exact knowledge of the pathomechanism of stroke and, as a consequence, new and more effective therapies can be expected.]

AFFILIATIONS

  1. Országos Pszichiátriai és Neurológiai Intézet, Radiológiai Osztály, Budapest
  2. SOTE Pszichiátriai Klinika, Budapest

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