Clinical Neuroscience

[BRAIN LATERALIZATION AND SEIZURE SEMIOLOGY: ICTAL CLINICAL LATERALIZING SIGNS]

HORVÁTH A. Réka1,2, KALMÁR Zsuzsanna1,2, FEHÉR Nóra1,2, FOGARASI András3, GYIMESI Csilla1, JANSZKY József1,2

JULY 30, 2008

Clinical Neuroscience - 2008;61(07-08)

[Clinical lateralizing signs are the phenomena which can unequivocally refer to the hemispheric onset of epileptic seizures. They can improve the localization of epileptogenic zone during presurgical evaluation, moreover, their presence can predict a success of surgical treatment. Primary sensory phenomena such as visual aura in one half of the field of vision or unilateral ictal somatosensory sensation always appear on the contralateral to the focus. Periictal unilateral headache, although it is an infrequent symptom, is usually an ipsilateral sign. Primary motor phenomena like epileptic clonic, tonic movements, the version of head ubiquitously appear contralateral to the epileptogenic zone. Very useful lateralization sign is the ictal hand-dystonia which lateralizes to the contralateral hemisphere in nearly 100%. The last clonus of the secondarily generalized tonic-clonic seizure lateralizes to the ipsilateral hemisphere in 85%. The fast component of ictal nystagmus appears in nearly 100% on the contralateral side of the epileptic focus. Vegetative symptoms during seizures arising from temporal lobe such as spitting, nausea, vomiting, urinary urge are typical for seizures originating from non-dominant (right) hemisphere. Ictal pallor and cold shivers are dominant hemispheric lateralization signs. Postictal unilateral nose wiping refers to the ipsilateral hemispheric focus compared to the wiping hand. Ictal or postictal aphasia refers to seizure arising from dominant hemisphere. Intelligable speech during complex partial seizures appears in non-dominant seizures. Automatism with preserved consciousness refers to the seizures of non-dominant temporal lobe.]

AFFILIATIONS

  1. Pécsi Tudományegyetem, Neurológiai Klinika, Pécs
  2. Pécsi Diagnosztikai Központ, Pécs
  3. Magyar Református Egyház, Bethesda Gyermekkórház, Budapest

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