Clinical Neuroscience

Association of anterior thoracic meningocele and azygos lobe of the lung

DENIZ Ersay Fatih1, SENAYLI Atilla2,3, BICAKCI Ünal2,4

JULY 30, 2016

Clinical Neuroscience - 2016;69(07-08)

DOI: https://doi.org/10.18071/isz.69.0277

Here we report an anterior thoracic meningocele case. Twoyears- old female patient was presented with kyphosis. Azygos lobe of the lung was also demonstrated during radiological studies. Posterolateral thoracotomy incision and extralpeural approach was performed for excision of the anterior meningocele to untether the cord. Although both anomalies are related to faulty embryogenesis and it is well known that faulty embryogenesis may also reveal coexisting abnormalities, we could not speculate a common mechanism for anterior thoracic meningocele and azygos lobe of the lung association.

AFFILIATIONS

  1. Faculty of Medicine, Department of Neurosurgery, Gaziosmanpasa University, Tokat, Turkey
  2. Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pediatric Surgery, Gaziosmanpasa University, Tokat, Turkey
  3. Ankara Yildirim Beyazit University, Department of Pediatric Surgery, Ankara, Turkey
  4. Faculty of Medicine, Department of Pediatric Surgery, Ondokuz Mayıs University, Samsun, Turkey

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