Clinical Neuroscience

[Abstracts of the 4th Pannonian Symposium on CNS Injury]

SEPTEMBER 30, 2008

Clinical Neuroscience - 2008;61(09-10)

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Clinical Neuroscience

[European Association of Young Neurologists and Trainees]

SZTRIHA László

Clinical Neuroscience

[In memoriam professor Lóránt Leel-Õssy]

MAJTÉNYI Katalin

Clinical Neuroscience

[Congress calendar]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Antiepileptic drugs as mood stabilizers: what did we learn from the epileptology?]

RAJNA Péter

[Author summarizes the practical aspects of psychiatric application of mood stabilizing antiepileptic drugs. He observes how to transfer experiences taken from the “epileptological” practice into the psychiatric care of bipolar patients. He shortly demonstrates the relevant information on the mechanisms of action, controversies and possible clinical effects influenced by the seizure inhibiting effect of the concerning molecules. By the opinion of the author the clinical importance of pharmacokinetic parameters are underestimated in the psychiatric practice. Therefore - as an original approach in the literature - he summarizes the detailed clinical indications of serum level measurements of antiepileptic drugs applied in psychiatry as mood stabilizers. The therapeutic experiences in epilepsy added a lot of practices for the most effective dosing, building, tapering and exchange of the mood stabilizer antiepileptics. Drug interactions (appear among the psychotropic drugs or with the commonly used medicines). As in any chronic therapies the main condition of patient's compliance is the lacking or very mild presence of the applied therapy. The paper discusses the most frequently occurring and drug-specific side effects in table forms. Using the term of “relative therapeutic potential” the need of balance between the efficacy (influenced by the choice and dosing) and the tolerance are pointed. Rules of application can change significantly in special populations like in pregnancy, obesity, chronic diseases or in chronic comorbide states and in case of polytherapy. As for the special therapeutic effects, the experiences are not completed even in group of antiepileptics: we have larger and more favorable knowledge on the traditional drugs (carbamazepine and valproates) and on lamotrigine (from the newer generation) but promising but not enough information exists on the newest antiepileptic molecules. Further targeted studies are needed for the identification and positioning of antiepileptic drugs in the palette of mood stabilizing pharmacotherapy and for the definition of evidence based, individually tailored and lifelong applied highly effective combinations of the mood stabilizing pharmacotherapy containing antiepileptic agents.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Paraneoplastic chronic demyelinating neuropathy and lambert-eaton myasthenic syndrome associated with multiple anti-neural antibodies and small-cell lung cancer]

RÓZSA Csilla, VINCENT Angela, ARÁNYI Zsuzsanna, KOVÁCS G. Gábor, KOMOLY Sámuel, ILLÉS Zsolt

[Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome (LEMS) developed in a patient with presumed chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) and negative chest CT. Since antibodies against both Hu and voltage-gated calcium channel (VGCC) were detected, repeated chest CT was performed, which eventually showed a pulmonary mass lesion. Biopsy revealed small cell lung cancer (SCLC) indicating the importance of repeated chest CT in LEMS even when an existing autoimmune-like disease and negative CT may suggest an autoimmune origin. This is the first report of paraneoplastic CIDP and LEMS associated with anti-Hu, anti-VGCC and SCLC.]

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Clinical Neuroscience

Cyanocobalamin and cholecalciferol synergistically improve functional and histopathological nerve healing in experimental rat model

ALBAY Cem, ADANIR Oktay, AKKALP Kahraman Asli, DOGAN Burcu Vasfiye, GULAEC Akif Mehmet, BEYTEMUR Ozan

Introduction - Peripheral nerve injury (PNI) is a frequent problem among young adults. Hopefully, regeneration can occur in PNI unlike central nervous system. If nerve cut is complete, gold standard treatment is surgery, but incomplete cuts have been tried to be treated by medicines. The aim of the study was to evaluate and compare clinical and histopathological outcomes of independent treatment of each of Vitamin B12 (B12) and Vitamin D3 (D3) and their combination on sciatic nerve injury in an experimental rat model. Materials and methods - Experimental animal study was performed after the approval of BEH Ethics Committee No. 2015/10. 32 rats were grouped into four (n=8) according to treatment procedures, such as Group 1 (controls with no treatment), Group 2 (intraperitoneal 1 mg/kg/day B12), Group 3 (oral 3500 IU/kg/week D3), Group 4 (intraperitoneal 1 mg/kg/day B12+ oral 3500 IU/kg/week D3). Sciatic Functional Index (SFI) and histopathological analysis were performed. Results - SFIs of Group 2, 3, 4 were statistically significantly higher than controls. Group 2 and 3 were statistically not different, however Group 4 was statistically significantly higher than others according to SFI. Axonal degeneration (AD) in all treatment groups were statistically significantly lower than in Group 1. AD in Group 4 was significantly lower than in Group 2 and 3; there was no significant difference between Group 2 and 3. There was no significant difference between Group 1,2 and 3 in Axonolysis (A). But A of Group 4 was significantly very much lower than all others. Oedema- inflammation (OE-I) in all treatment groups were significantly lower than in Group 1; there was no significant difference between Group 2 and group 4. OE-I in Group 2 and 4 were significantly lower than in Group 3. There were no significant differences between Group 1, 2 and 3 in damage level scores; score of Group 4 was significantly lower than of Group 1. Conclusions - B12 and D3 were found effective with no statistically significant difference. But combined use of B12 and D3 improve nerve healing synergistically. We recommend combined use of B12 and D3 after PNI as soon as possible.

Clinical Neuroscience

The effects of the level of spinal cord injury on life satisfaction and disability

GULSAH Karatas, NESLIHAN Metli, ELIF Yalcin, RAMAZAN Gündüz, FATIH Karatas, MÜFIT Akyuz

Introduction - Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) may often lead to significant disability in affected individuals and reduce life satisfaction. Herein we aimed to investigate the effects of the level of injury on disability and life satisfaction as well as the relation between life satisfaction and disability. Methods - Patients with at least one-year history of SCI were included. Demographic-clinical data of patients were recorded. The Craig Handicap Assessment and Reporting Technique-Short Form (CHART-SF) was used for quantifying the degree of patients’ disability. Life satisfaction was assessed by the Satisfaction with Life Scale (SWLS). Results - Of the 76 patients, 21 (27.6%) were tetraplegic and 55 (72.4%) were paraplegic. SWLS was found to be similar in tetraplegic vs. paraplegic patients (P=0.59), whereas CHART parameters such as physical independence, mobility, occupation, and total CHART value were significantly higher in paraplegic patients (P=0.04, P=0.04, P=0.001 and P=0.01, respectively). Social integration was found similarly high in both groups. There was a positive correlation between elapsed time after the injury and CHART physical independence, occupation and the level of economic sufficiency (P<0.01, P<0.01, P=0.01). Excluding the economic sufficiency (P=0.02), there was not any other association between the rest of CHART parameters and SWLS. Conclusions - According to our findings, although the level of injury seems to be influential on disability, it seems to have no significant effect on life satisfaction. Since the only thing that positively affects life satisfaction is economic sufficiency, more emphasis should be placed on regulations that increase the return to work in patients.

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Abstracts of Hungarian authors’ articles published abroad]

Hungarian Radiology

[XV. Symposium and Postgradual Training of the Pediatric Radiologists]

KIS Éva

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Epidemilogy of hepatitis C virus and possibilities of transmission]

HAGYMÁSI Krisztina, LENGYEL Gabriella

[The medical impact of hepatitis C (HCV) is significant worldwide. The main consequences are chronic hepatic injury, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma formation. The estimated global prevalence is 3% with 180 million infected people worldwide. The prevalence <1% in Hungary. The prevalence increased between 1990 and 2005 in East Asia, Western Europe, and West sub-Saharan Africa. There is characteristic geographical distribution of the main HCV genotypes. The mode of transmission can not be identified of 40% of cases. The most frequent transmission is the intravénás drug injection in the developed countries, and unsafe health procedures in developing countries. The sensitive, nucleic acid amplification testing, identification of high-risk groups, development of vaccination would help the HCV prevalence in the future. ]