Clinical Neuroscience

[Abstracts of the 2nd Pannonian Symposium on CNS Injury]

JUNE 20, 2003

Clinical Neuroscience - 2003;56(05-06)

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[What is neurorehabilitation?]

URBÁN Edina, FÁY Veronika

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[Combined anterior and posterior approach to the tumours of the cervicothoracic junction: our experience]

BANCZEROWSKI Péter, LIPÓTH László, VERES Róbert

[Introduction - In the past, surgery of the pathologies of cervicothoracic junction carried high risk. Better knowledge of the anatomical situation and the increasing experience with anterior approach, corpectomy and spinal stabilization instruments have all made possible to remove the tumours of the cervicothoracic junction in a combined way. Case reports - The authors present six cases of spinal tumours where removal was done via anterior approach with partial clavicle and sternal resection. In two cases the anterior approach were combined with posterior tumour removal and fixation. Two of the cases were metastatic tumours, one lymphoma, one osteochondroma, one giant cell osteoid tumour and one malignant neurogenic tumour. The ventral approach gave a relatively wide window to explore the tumours and with the help of the operative microscope the tumour removal went fairly well. After total removal of the tumours the cervical spine were stabilized with own clavicle or iliac bone graft, titanium plate and screws. In patients with three-column involvement posterior fixation was made. The immediate recovery of the patients was well and there were no postoperative complications. Postoperative CT and MRI scans have great value in the early control after surgery as well as for the follow up of the patients. Conclusion - The anterior approach with partial clavicle and sternal resection combined with posterior approach and fixation seems to be feasible and safe method to explore and remove cervicothoracic junction pathologies.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[CONGRESS CALENDAR]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Is there any importance of the Leiden mutation in the pathogenesis of ischaemic stroke?]

PONGRÁCZ Endre, TORDAI Attila, CSORNAI Márta, BÉLA Zsuzsanna, NAGY Zoltán

[Background - There are conflicting data about the role of Leiden mutation in the pathogenesis of cerebral arterial thrombosis. In order to obtain relevant data, authors investigated the prevalency of factor V Leiden (A506G) both in healthy subjects and in a subgroup of ischaemic stroke patients. Matherial and methods - Blood samples of 171 healthy persons and 254 ischaemic stroke patients were examined by PCR method for Leiden mutation. Ischaemic lesions in the stroke group were documented by CT or MRI. A routin questionnaire was used to study the family history of vascular events (hypertension, diabetes, POAD, stroke, myocardial infarction) of patients. Conventional vascular risk factors of patients were also documented. Results - The prevalence of Leiden mutation was 7.2% in healthy persons and 11.9% in stroke patients. The OR for 254 patient was 1,45 (0.71-2.97). In the subgroup of young patients: age <50 (n=134) the OR was 1.67 (0.75-3.70) and in the elderly patients group: age >50 (n=120) the OR was 1.21 (0.50-2.89). In the family history of stroke patients having Leiden mutation (hetero- and homozigosity) the stroke prevalence was higher (p=0.01). In the ischaemic stroke group, age<50 with polymorphism a tight correlation with hyperlipidaemia (p=0.03) was found. In the group of age<50 with heterozigosity for Leiden, a lower plasma fibrinogen concentration (p=0.02) was found. The polymorphism showed no correlation with the hypertension, hyperuricaemia, migraine, diabetes mellitus, smoking, alcohol consumption and CDS status of patients. Conclusion - When comparing stroke patients to control population there is no significant increase in the frequency of Leiden mutation. Leiden mutation together with hyperlipidaemia and stroke in the family history results in high risk for ischaemic stroke in young patients.]

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[Hungarian Society of EEG- and Clinical Neurophysiology]

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Cyanocobalamin and cholecalciferol synergistically improve functional and histopathological nerve healing in experimental rat model

ALBAY Cem, ADANIR Oktay, AKKALP Kahraman Asli, DOGAN Burcu Vasfiye, GULAEC Akif Mehmet, BEYTEMUR Ozan

Introduction - Peripheral nerve injury (PNI) is a frequent problem among young adults. Hopefully, regeneration can occur in PNI unlike central nervous system. If nerve cut is complete, gold standard treatment is surgery, but incomplete cuts have been tried to be treated by medicines. The aim of the study was to evaluate and compare clinical and histopathological outcomes of independent treatment of each of Vitamin B12 (B12) and Vitamin D3 (D3) and their combination on sciatic nerve injury in an experimental rat model. Materials and methods - Experimental animal study was performed after the approval of BEH Ethics Committee No. 2015/10. 32 rats were grouped into four (n=8) according to treatment procedures, such as Group 1 (controls with no treatment), Group 2 (intraperitoneal 1 mg/kg/day B12), Group 3 (oral 3500 IU/kg/week D3), Group 4 (intraperitoneal 1 mg/kg/day B12+ oral 3500 IU/kg/week D3). Sciatic Functional Index (SFI) and histopathological analysis were performed. Results - SFIs of Group 2, 3, 4 were statistically significantly higher than controls. Group 2 and 3 were statistically not different, however Group 4 was statistically significantly higher than others according to SFI. Axonal degeneration (AD) in all treatment groups were statistically significantly lower than in Group 1. AD in Group 4 was significantly lower than in Group 2 and 3; there was no significant difference between Group 2 and 3. There was no significant difference between Group 1,2 and 3 in Axonolysis (A). But A of Group 4 was significantly very much lower than all others. Oedema- inflammation (OE-I) in all treatment groups were significantly lower than in Group 1; there was no significant difference between Group 2 and group 4. OE-I in Group 2 and 4 were significantly lower than in Group 3. There were no significant differences between Group 1, 2 and 3 in damage level scores; score of Group 4 was significantly lower than of Group 1. Conclusions - B12 and D3 were found effective with no statistically significant difference. But combined use of B12 and D3 improve nerve healing synergistically. We recommend combined use of B12 and D3 after PNI as soon as possible.

Clinical Neuroscience

The effects of the level of spinal cord injury on life satisfaction and disability

GULSAH Karatas, NESLIHAN Metli, ELIF Yalcin, RAMAZAN Gündüz, FATIH Karatas, MÜFIT Akyuz

Introduction - Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) may often lead to significant disability in affected individuals and reduce life satisfaction. Herein we aimed to investigate the effects of the level of injury on disability and life satisfaction as well as the relation between life satisfaction and disability. Methods - Patients with at least one-year history of SCI were included. Demographic-clinical data of patients were recorded. The Craig Handicap Assessment and Reporting Technique-Short Form (CHART-SF) was used for quantifying the degree of patients’ disability. Life satisfaction was assessed by the Satisfaction with Life Scale (SWLS). Results - Of the 76 patients, 21 (27.6%) were tetraplegic and 55 (72.4%) were paraplegic. SWLS was found to be similar in tetraplegic vs. paraplegic patients (P=0.59), whereas CHART parameters such as physical independence, mobility, occupation, and total CHART value were significantly higher in paraplegic patients (P=0.04, P=0.04, P=0.001 and P=0.01, respectively). Social integration was found similarly high in both groups. There was a positive correlation between elapsed time after the injury and CHART physical independence, occupation and the level of economic sufficiency (P<0.01, P<0.01, P=0.01). Excluding the economic sufficiency (P=0.02), there was not any other association between the rest of CHART parameters and SWLS. Conclusions - According to our findings, although the level of injury seems to be influential on disability, it seems to have no significant effect on life satisfaction. Since the only thing that positively affects life satisfaction is economic sufficiency, more emphasis should be placed on regulations that increase the return to work in patients.

Clinical Neuroscience

[Mentalizing deficit in neurological disorders: a review article]

HEROLD Róbert, VARGA Eszter, MIKE Andrea, TÉNYI Tamás, SIMON Mária, HAJNAL András, FEKETE Sándor, ILLÉS Zsolt

[Introduction – Mentalization is the ability to attribute mental states (intentions, desires, thoughts, emotions) to others, and hence to predict their behaviour. This ability fundamentally determines our participation in social relationships and adaptation to society. A significant proportion of the disorders of the central nervous system (CNS) affects those brain structures and neurotransmitter systems that play a role in the mentalizing processes. Accordingly, a number of CNS disorders may be associated with mentalizing deficits, which may affect the outcome of these diseases. Here, we review recent research on mentalizing abilities in neurological diseases. Methods – An internet database search was performed to identify publications on the subject. Results – Sixty-two publications in English corresponded to the search criteria. These publications reported impaired mentalization in several neurological disorders (e.g. epilepsy, Parkinson’s disease, multiple sclerosis, dementias, traumatic brain injury). Discussion – The results indicate that a number of neurological disorders associate with mentalizing deficit. This deficit is often present in the early stages of the diseases and has a prognostic value, which in turn emphasizes the importance of the early detection and adequate rehabilitation.]

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