Ca&Bone

[Overcome of bisphosphonate resistance with alphacalcidol: results of a one year, open follow-up study]

GAÁL János, BENDER Tamás, VARGA József, HORVÁTH Irén, KISS Judit, SOMOGYI Péter, SURÁNYI Péter

DECEMBER 28, 2009

Ca&Bone - 2009;12(03)

[INTRODUCTION - A considerable part of osteoporotic patients do not respond satisfactorily to adequate treatment with a bisphosphonate plus supplementation with calcium and conventional vitamin D3. This study intended to determine whether the replacement of vitamin D3 with alphacalcidol results in any BMD increase, i.e. is it possible to overcome resistance to bisphosphonates. PATIENTS AND METHOD - In 76 patients unresponsive to the combination of alendronate and conventional vitamin D3, the latter had been replaced with alphacalcidol (0.5 μg/day), and then the patients were followed up for a year. Clinical and laboratory parameters were recorded at baseline and after one year of treatment; and their changes were analysed by statistical methods. RESULTS - After treatment for one year, Wilcoxon test revealed a small but statistically significant (p<0.001) increase in the BMD values of the forearm (+2.2%) and lumbar vertebrae (+1.4%). At the end of the treatment period, the following, significant changes were observed compared to baseline (median values): serum calcium level increased by 0,06 mmol/l; serum phosphorus level decreased by 0.05 mmol/l, serum alkaline phosphatase activity decreased by 13 U/l, and urinary calcium/creatinine ratio in first-voided morning urine increased by 0.1. Additionally, serum PTH level decreased by 10.7 pg/ml (median). Serum levels of osteocalcin decreased by 0.4 ng/ml, along with the urinary D-Pyr /kreatinine ratio by 0.2 nmol/mmol (median). No significant increase of adverse events occurred. DISCUSSION - As suggested by our results, combination therapy with alendronate and alfacalcidol increases bone density and improves the biochemical markers of bone turnover - without any substantial increase in the incidence of adverse effects.]

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[The risk factors of osteoporosis and osteoporotic fractures in Hungarian women: the results of the NOKK study]

MEZŐ Tibor, TABÁK Ádám, BHATTOA Harjit Pál, LAKATOS Péter

[INTRODUCTION - It is widely accepted from Western European and the US studies that race and geography significantly affect the risk for osteoporosis. Less is known about similar associations in Eastern European subjects. Our aim was to describe the risk factors for osteoporotic fractures and osteoporosis in a selected female population in a cross-sectional, multi-center study performed under the guidance of the Hungarian Society for osteoporosis and Osteoarthrology. MATERIAL AND METHOD - From 10 randomly selected regional osteoporosis centers, altogether 2602 women >18 years of age, referred with any osteoarthrological reason, participated. During their visit data on risk factors, blood pressure, anthropometry, and bone mineral density were collected. RESULTS - Using multiple regression we found that older age, lower diastolic blood pressure, family history of bone fracture, fall in previous year and lower T-score were independently related to fractures. Independent risk factors for femoral osteoporosis included older age, lower weight, family history of fracture, less physical activity, fall in the previous year and glucocorticoid treatment. DISCUSSION - Our study is the first large-scale epidemiological survey describing risk factors of osteoporosis and fractures in a Hungarian female population. Our data may suggest that lower diastolic blood pressure might be related to osteoporotic fractures.]

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HORVÁTH CSABA

Ca&Bone

[Vitamin D in autoimmun disorders: the immunregulatory effect of vitamin D and therapeutic opportunities]

ZÖLD Éva, SZODORAY Péter, GAÁL János, SZEGEDI Andrea, SZEGEDI Gyula, BODOLAY Edit

[There is recent evidence that genetic and environmental factors play an important role in the development of autoimmune diseases. Vitamin D deficiency is one of the environmental factors that may play a role in developing autoimmune diseases. Low vitamin D status has been implicated in the etiology of autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis, systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, inzulin dependent diabetes mellitus, and inflammatory bowel disease. Experimentally, vitamin D deficiency results in an increased incidence of autoimmune disease. The authors discuss the accumulating evidence pointing to a link between vitamin D and autoimmunity. The optimal level of vitamin D intake is necessary to normalize the immune functions and it plays an important role in the development of self-tolerance. Targets for vitamin D in the immune system have been identified and the mechanism of vitamin D mediated immunoregulation is beginning to be understood. On the basic of recent knowledge, vitamin D causes a decrease in Th1-driven autoimmune response and repairs the function of regulatory T cells. Increased vitamin D intakes might decrease the incidence and severity of autoimmune diseases.]

Ca&Bone

[Modelling of burden of femoral neck fracture from purchaser’s point of view]

SEBESTYÉN Andor, PÉNTEK Márta, GULÁCSI László, NYÁRÁDY József

[OBJECTIVE - This study provides a model of the treatment cost of femoral neck fracture and financial burden of the annual fracture cases at 2009 financial level from health insurance point of view. METHOD - The costs of the treatment of femoral neck fractures are modelled according to the actually OEP reimbursed types of care including acute inpatient care, chronic inpatient care, outpatient care, pharmaceuticals and medical devices, home care (nursing), cost of travelling or transport and the disability to work. Cases healing following primary treatment (without complications) and cases with complications are examined separately. The costs of most common complications with large surgical operation are calculated. RESULTS - The cost of patients in active age-groups cured by primary treatment can vary in a range of 1.010.110- 1.479.034 HUF depending on cost level of individual care and utilization, while the cost of patients in retired agegroups (pensioners) can vary in a range 635.350- 1.104.274 HUF. The cost of patients with complication (primary treatment and complication) in active agegroups can reach. 1 858.438-3.133.096 HUF depending on cost level of individual care and utilization, while the cost of patients in retired age-groups (pensioners) can reach 1.108.918-2.383.576 HUF. According to our model calculations, the cost of primary treatment of femoral neck fractures and essential further treatment represents an annual burden of 4.373.857.668-6.247.717.438 HUF for the health insurance system. CONCLUSION - In order to reduce the incidence of hip fractures one should emphasize the importance of current and future interventions, which projects the possibility of reducing the financial burden at societal level. The analysis of financial burden could serve as a base for health-economics studies, by elaborating a cost-effective strategy supported by professional and political decision makers.]

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[Bone metabolism and body mass index in postmenopausal women]

TÁRCZY Csaba,Toldy Erzsébet, SZERB János, VARGA László

[INTRODUCTION - In addition to several other causes constitutional factors play an important role in the development of osteoporosis.Various aspects of bone metabolism were examined to explain the differences in bone density between women with low and high body mass index (BMI). PATIENTS AND METHOD - One hundred and ninetytwo postmenopausal women were included in the study. Bone density was measured by forearm densitometry.To assess bone formation, serum osteocalcin levels were measured, while the rate of bone absorption was estimated from C-terminal telopeptide levels of collagen type I measured in urine and blood. RESULTS - The prevalence of osteoporosis was higher in women with low BMI than in those with normal or higher BMI. Bone metabolism - both formation and absorption - was increased in both groups, however, in women with low BMI this increase was more pronounced and bone metabolism tended to be shifted to absorption compared to patients with normal or higher BMI. CONCLUSION - Postmenopausal lean women have accelerated bone metabolism compared to obese women. This fact and the shift to absorption may be the main reasons for the higher frequency of osteoporosis found by densitometry in women with low BMI than in those with higher BMI.]

Ca&Bone

[The increase of fracture risk in type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus]

HULLÓ DANIELLA

[Studies in the last couple of years found more and more convincing evidence about the fact that impaired glucose metabolism leads to structural changes in the skeletal system leading toward osteoporosis. While patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus have decreased bone density, measurement showed increased bone mineral density in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Despite these differences, risk of vertebral and nonvertebral fractures is increased in both groups of diabetic patients. Decreased pancreatic beta cell function is accompanied by several hormonal disturbances leading to decreased bone formation even in the early stage of diabetes. Peak bone mass of diabetic children is lower than found in nondiabetic children. Late complications of diabetes, vascular and neuronal impairments, impaired renal function, and secondary hormonal disturbances are added to this process. IGF-1 may have a crucial role in the pathogenesis of osteoporosis in diabetes. The structure of the molecule is similar to insulin. IGF-1 has effect on normal bone formation, inhibits the apoptosis and interferes with several other metabolic pathways. IGF-1 mediates the effect of growth hormone to the muscular and skeletal system. IGF-1 level decreases with age, and lower level of IGF-1 is found in diabetic patients. Long term complications of diabetes can also occur, which may enhance the process of bone resorption. Although the evidence is growing that fracture risk is higher in diabetic patiens, there are still scientists who question the association between the two disorders.]

Ca&Bone

[The risk factors of osteoporosis and osteoporotic fractures in Hungarian women: the results of the NOKK study]

MEZŐ Tibor, TABÁK Ádám, BHATTOA Harjit Pál, LAKATOS Péter

[INTRODUCTION - It is widely accepted from Western European and the US studies that race and geography significantly affect the risk for osteoporosis. Less is known about similar associations in Eastern European subjects. Our aim was to describe the risk factors for osteoporotic fractures and osteoporosis in a selected female population in a cross-sectional, multi-center study performed under the guidance of the Hungarian Society for osteoporosis and Osteoarthrology. MATERIAL AND METHOD - From 10 randomly selected regional osteoporosis centers, altogether 2602 women >18 years of age, referred with any osteoarthrological reason, participated. During their visit data on risk factors, blood pressure, anthropometry, and bone mineral density were collected. RESULTS - Using multiple regression we found that older age, lower diastolic blood pressure, family history of bone fracture, fall in previous year and lower T-score were independently related to fractures. Independent risk factors for femoral osteoporosis included older age, lower weight, family history of fracture, less physical activity, fall in the previous year and glucocorticoid treatment. DISCUSSION - Our study is the first large-scale epidemiological survey describing risk factors of osteoporosis and fractures in a Hungarian female population. Our data may suggest that lower diastolic blood pressure might be related to osteoporotic fractures.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

[PREVALENCE OF OSTEOPOROSIS IN PATIENTS WITH COLLES’ FRACTURE]

NAGY József, BÁLINT Géza, TAKÁCS Katalin, WINKLER Valéria, RATKÓ István, BÁLINT Péter

[INTRODUCTION - Studies suggest that Colles’ fracture is the earliest of the osteoporotic fractures, and thus may be the first indication of the disease. PATIENTS AND METHODS - Fifty-seven consecutive patients with Colles’ fracture who presented between 1st of October 2003 and 1st of February 2004 at the traumatology out-patient clinic of Semmelweis Hospital, Kiskunhalas were screened for osteoporosis. RESULTS - Of the 43 postmenopausal women, 41 was found to have osteoporosis by DEXA scan, but only one was aware of her disease and received treatment. Out of these 41 patients 15 had fractures previously, 9 of whom had more than one. None of the four premenopausal women had osteoporotic DEXA measurement values. All of the 10 male patients had osteoporosis, 6 had previous fractures, 5 of them more then once. One patient required surgery, there was a prolonged fracture healing in 10 cases, and reflex sympathetic dystrophy developed in 3 patients. CONCLUSION - Since in this study more than 95% of postmenopausal women with Colles’ fracture had underlying osteoporosis, the authors conclude that DEXA scanning of these patients is recommended. Based on the results, it seems that screening for osteoporosis is indicated for both men and women after radius fracture.]

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[Association between osteoporosis and nutrition during the history of human evolution]

KISS Zoltán, KISS István, JÓZSA László

[From the Palaeolithic age to the twentieth century, nutritional habits as well as the quality and composition of nutritients changed dramatically. The protein-based calorie intake of former Homo species had been replaced by a carbohydrate-based nutrition since the Neolithic revolution (the transition to agriculture). The start of food production also changed the range of nutrients and the start of sedentary lifestyle. At the same time, approximately five thousand years ago osteoporosis appeared. In this paper, the authors give a short review of eating habits and foods of early Homo species in the Palaeolithic Age and of Homo sapiens in Neolithic Age, Antiquity, Middle Ages and Modern Age, and discuss the possible relationship of nutrition and osteoporosis.]