Ca&Bone

[Epidemiologic features of nephrolithiasis in Hungary, based on morbidity data on hospitalized patients]

SILLER György és munkatársai

APRIL 20, 2002

Ca&Bone - 2002;5(01-02)

[AIM - To examine geographic, gender and age differences in the morbidity of nephrolithiasis (NL) in Hungary based on data from hospitalised NL cases. PATIENTS AND METHODS:The descriptive epidemiologic study involved settlements with 2,000 or more inhabitants and applied a spatial accumulation analysis to reveal any significant differences from the national average. Standardized morbidity ratios (SMRs) were calculated by indirect standardization and differences were tested by the c2 test. RESULTS - In the period between 1997 and 1999, a significant spatial accumulation of NL morbidity in the 0-100 year age group without stratification by gender was observed in Zala,Vas, Nógrád and Bács-Kiskun counties. The male:female ratio was 1:0.98.The highest morbidity surplus was found in the 35-64 age group, which in females extended into the over 65 year age group.There were 158.33 NL cases per 10,000 hospital discharges. CONCLUSION - Morbidity data of hospitalised NL patients show significant geographic differences. In contrast to literature data, no gender differences were found.The causes of the observed geographic, age and gender differences require further investigations.]

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[Vitamin D receptor gene BsmI polymorphism in rheumatoid arthritis and associated osteoporosis]

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[Rheumatoid arthritis is frequently associated with secondary osteopenia or osteoporosis. Gene polymorphisms, such as the BsmI polymorphism of the vitamin D receptor gene are likely to be be involved in the pathogenesis of osteoporosis. However, very little information is available on the role of the BsmI polymorphism in rheumatoid arthritis or in arthritisassociated metabolic bone disorders. Here the authors review international data on vitamin D receptor gene polymorphisms and their relationship with bone metabolism.The authors emphasize that more detailed research is needed to clarify the relationship between these polymorphisms and rheumatoid arthritis.]

Ca&Bone

[Bibliography of Hungarian literature on calcium and bone metabolism, 2001]

TÓTH EDIT

Ca&Bone

[Dear Colleagues and Readers!]

HORVÁTH CSABA

Ca&Bone

[In memoriam - Bossányi Ada]

VÍZKELETY Tibor

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