Ca&Bone

[Epidemiologic features of nephrolithiasis in Hungary, based on morbidity data on hospitalized patients]

SILLER György1, PÁLDY Anna2, NÁDOR Gizella2, VINCZE István2, ZSÁMBIKINÉ Bakacs Márta2, PINTÉR Alán2, HORVÁTH CSABA3

APRIL 20, 2002

Ca&Bone - 2002;5(01-02)

[AIM - To examine geographic, gender and age differences in the morbidity of nephrolithiasis (NL) in Hungary based on data from hospitalised NL cases. PATIENTS AND METHODS:The descriptive epidemiologic study involved settlements with 2,000 or more inhabitants and applied a spatial accumulation analysis to reveal any significant differences from the national average. Standardized morbidity ratios (SMRs) were calculated by indirect standardization and differences were tested by the c2 test. RESULTS - In the period between 1997 and 1999, a significant spatial accumulation of NL morbidity in the 0-100 year age group without stratification by gender was observed in Zala,Vas, Nógrád and Bács-Kiskun counties. The male:female ratio was 1:0.98.The highest morbidity surplus was found in the 35-64 age group, which in females extended into the over 65 year age group.There were 158.33 NL cases per 10,000 hospital discharges. CONCLUSION - Morbidity data of hospitalised NL patients show significant geographic differences. In contrast to literature data, no gender differences were found.The causes of the observed geographic, age and gender differences require further investigations.]

AFFILIATIONS

  1. Fõvárosi Önkormányzat Károlyi Sándor Kórház és Rendelõintézet
  2. Fodor József Országos Közegészségügyi Központ Országos Környezet-egészségügyi Intézete
  3. Semmelweis Egyetem, ÁOK, I. Belgyógyászati Klinika

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Ca&Bone

[Bibliography of Hungarian literature on calcium and bone metabolism, 2001]

TÓTH EDIT

Ca&Bone

[Evaluation of bone mineralization in cow’s milk sensitive children]

HIDVÉGI Edit, ARATÓ András, CSERHÁTI Endre, SZABÓ Antal, SZABÓ András, HORVÁTH CSABA

[BACKGROUND - Patients with cow's milk allergy (CMA) form a potential risk group for osteopenia, because their milk-free diet usually has a low calcium content.The study analyses various parameters of bone mineralization in CMA children. PATIENTS AND METHODS - Twenty-seven CMA patients (mean age: 4.3 years, range: 3-8 years) were enrolled in the study.Transient sensitivity to cow's milk was observed in 20 of 27 patients. During the milk-free diet period (mean duration 11.8 months) children were fed by extensively hydrolysed or soy-based formulas. Seven patients still required a cow's milk free diet at the time of the study. Serum levels of Na, K, Cl, Ca, P and Mg ions, as well as of alkaline phosphatase (AP), parathyroid hormone (PTH), osteocalcin and beta-crosslaps were determined for all 27 patients.The values were compared to those of 20 healthy age-matched controls. Bone mineral densities (BMDs) of CMA patients were also measured. RESULTS - The AP and PTH levels were higher in CMA patients than in the control group (AP: 610.2 U/l vs 499.7 U/l, p<0.01; PTH: 1.56 pmol/l vs 0.83 pmol/l, p<0.03), but all values fell in the normal range.The osteocalcin level was similar in the two groups, and the beta-crosslaps was lower in CMA patients than in the controls (0.92 vs 1.47 ng/ml, p<0.001).There was a positive correlation between both AP and osteocalcin and AP and beta-crosslaps levels.The mean Z score of bone mineral density in patients with CMA was -0.6. In 10 cases the Z score was below -1, which was associated with a significantly elevated PTH level compared to the group of patients with a Z score above - 1 (2.24 pmol/l vs 1.16 pmol/l, p<0.03). CONCLUSION - In children with CMA on a cow's milk free diet, slight disturbances of bone mineralization were observed, therefore, osteodensitometric check-up of these children is recommended.]

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[In memoriam - Bossányi Ada]

VÍZKELETY Tibor

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