LAM KID

[Quality of life of patients with osteoporosis in Hungary]

VOKÓ Zoltán, INOTAI András, HORVÁTH CSABA, BORS Katalin, SPEER Gábor, KALÓ Zoltán

DECEMBER 20, 2013

LAM KID - 2013;3(04)

[AIM - The aim of our study was to estimate the loss of quality of life due to osteoporotic fractures. We performed a cross-sectional study including 840 patients in 21 centers that specialise in the care of patients with osteoporosis and in acute care of fractures. METHODS - Patients were selected randomly and stratified for the location of and time elapsed since the fracture. Quality of life (QoL) was assessed by the Qualeffo-41 and the EuroQol-5D questionnaires. RESULTS - Patients with morphometric fractures of more than one vertebra had the lowest median EQ-5D index value (0.59). Symptomatic vertebral, hip and arm fractures also considerably decreased QoL. Patients with morphometric fractures of more than one vertebra had the lowest total Qualeffo-41 score. When controlled for age and gender, patients with hip fracture or morphometric vertebral fracture had at least 0.2 less mean utility values than had osteoporotic patients without history of fracture. Patients with more than a oneyear history of hip fracture had QoL scores as low as had patients with an acute fracture. In case of wrist and arm fractures, the acute loss of QoL somewhat decreased with time. CONCLUSION - In conclusion, osteoporotic fractures, especially hip and vertebral fractures result in a significant loss of patients’ quality of life. Our results show that physicians need to pay a close attention to morphometric vertebral fractures, which contribute to a great loss of human capital.]

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LAM KID

[About vitamin D - let’s combine!]

HONTVÁRI Lívia

[Vitamin D deficiency is a worldwide health problem. On the basis of the recommendations of the latest vitamin D consensus conference, we would like to draw attention to the significance of prevention as well as the recognition and treatment of vitamin D deficiency. We mention that some antiporotics designated “prefix” or “combi” are available that may ensure adequate calcium and vitamin D intake, thus improving patient’s adherence.]

LAM KID

[Once again on adherence - Is it just fashionable or indeed a timely issue?]

VALKUSZ Zsuzsanna

[Nonadherence to pharmacological treat-ment in osteoporosis is a well-recognised problem not only in Hungary but all over the world. As in other chronic diseases, adherence to osteoporosis treatment is poor, which results in serious problems affecting patients as well as health care resources. Low adherence rates consistent-ly result in increased rates of fractures. Some approaches aimed to improve com-plience and persistence, such as extension of dosing intervals, might improve patients’ adherence to therapy. International clinical studies have demonstrated that the number of fractures cannot be reduced without suf-ficient adherence. Improving patient edu-cation, enhancing interactions between health care providers and patients, taking into account patients’ preferences and involving them in treatment decisions may all improve adherence.]

LAM KID

[Our predecessors were right - Closing remarks on the solubility of urate crystals in microscopic specimens]

BÉLY Miklós, KRUTSAY Miklós

[The authors studied the solubility of urate crystals in alcohol, in an 8% aqueous solution of formaldehyde and in acetone, respectively. The urate crystals were least soluble in alcohol. In comparison, the amount of urate crystals decreased in the aqueous solution of formaldehyde, which confirmed the suggestion of our predecessors that tissues suspected to contain urate crystals should be fixed in alcohol. Urate crystals dissolved in greatest amounts in acetone. Acetone is widely used by histological laboratories for dehydration of tissue blocks before embedding them in paraffin, which, in case of fixation in aqueous formaldehyde, contributes to the dissolution of urate crystals. In our earlier studies, we found that dissolution of urate crystals from haematoxylineosin stained sections is caused by the staining of nuclei in haematoxylin, therefore urate crystals are preferably demonstrated in unstained tissue sections.]

LAM KID

[Femoral neck fractures treated with DHLS screws - early results]

KOCSIS András, KÁDAS István, KÁDAS Dániel, HANGODY László

[In Hungary, the treatment approach for medial femoral neck fractures depends on the type of fracture and the overall condition of the patient. An obvious goal is to minimise the most common complications of the applied method, namely avascular necrosis of the head and redisplacement, while maintaining a low-risk and minimally invasive technique. Following the surgical method most commonly used in our country, we combined the double cannullated screws technique with the compressing HeadLess Screw System. This way we succeeded to achieve intraoperative compression, which provides intensified stability while retaining the principles of minimally invasive techniques.]

LAM KID

[MicroRNAs as a new family of hormones]

BOJCSUK Dóra, SIPOS Lilla, BÁLINT Bálint László

[MicroRNA molecules regulate the translation of mRNAs to proteins. In a study published by Maria A. Cortez and her colleagues in Nature in 2011, the authors suggest that miRNAs, known as biomarkers and translation regulators, could be considered as nucleic acid hormones. In this paper we introduce the characteristics of microRNAs that support their function as hormones.]

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Clinical Neuroscience

[Disease burden of Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients and their caregivers]

PÉNTEK Márta, HERCZEGFALVI Ágnes, MOLNÁR Mária Judit, SZŐNYI László Pál, KOSZTOLÁNYI György, PFLIEGLER György, MELEGH Béla, BONCZ Imre, BRODSZKY Valentin, BAJI Petra, SZEGEDI Márta, POGÁNY Gábor, GULÁCSI László

[Background and purpose - Data on the disease burden of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy are scarce in Hungary. The aim of this study was to assess patients’ and their caregivers’ health related quality of life and healthcare utilisations. Methods - A cross sectional survey was performed as part of the European BURQOL-RD project. The EQ-5D-5L and Barthel Index questionnaires were applied, health care utilisations and patients’ informal carers were surveyed. Results - One symptomatic female carer, 50 children (boys 94%) and six adult patients (five males) participated in the study, the latter two subgroups were included in the analysis. The average age was 9.7 (SD=4.6) and 24.3 (SD=9.8) years, respectively. Median age at time of diagnosis was three years. The average EQ-5D score among children and adults was 0.198 (SD=0.417) and 0.244 (SD=0.322), respectively, the Barthel Index was 57.6 (SD=29.9) and 53.0 (SD=36.5). Score of satisfaction with healthcare (10-point Likert-scale) was mean 5.3 (SD=2.1) and 5.3 (SD=2.9). 15 children were hospitalised in the past 12 months for mean 12.9 (SD=24.5) days. Two patients received help from professional carer. 25 children (mean age 11.1, SD=4.4 years) were helped/supervisied by principal informal carer (parent) for mean 90.1 (SD=44.4) hours/week and further family members helped in 21 cases. Correlation between EQ-5D and Barthel Index was strong and significant (0.731; p<0.01) as well as with informal care time (-0.770; p<0.01), but correlation with satisfaction with health care was not significant (EQ-5D: 0.241; Barthel Index: 0.219; informal care: -0.142). Conclusion - Duchenne muscular dystrophy leads to a significant deterioration in the quality of life of patients. Parents play outstanding role in the care of affected children. This study is the first in the Central and Eastern European region that provides quality of life data in this rare disease for further health economic studies.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Examining the psychometric properties of a new quality of life questionnaire in migraineurs]

MANHALTER Nóra, PALÁSTI Ágnes, BOZSIK György, ÁFRA Judit, ERTSEY Csaba

[Background - The deleterious effect of primary headaches on the sufferers’ quality of life (QOL) has been abundantly documented using both generic and headache-specific instruments. The currently used questionnaires focus on a limited number of factors and therefore may not be sensitive enough to detect the effect of headache type and headache characteristics on QOL, despite the obvious clinical differences. We have devised a comprehensive questionnaire that may be more sensitive to the burden of headache. Objective - To assess the psychometric properties of the new questionnaire on a group of migraineurs. Patients and method - We studied 117 migraineurs who completed the validated Hungarian version of the SF-36 generic QOL measure and our new, 25-item questionnaire. Reliability was assessed by internal consistency, measured by Cronbach’s a of all items. Content validity was exam- ined by calculating the correlation of the items with subscales of the SF-36 measure. The correlation of the patients’ migraine characteristics with the questionnaire’s items was used to assess criterion validity. Results - The questionnaire was quick and easy to administer. The questionnaire demonstrated good reliability, with Cronbach’s alpha being 0.893. Content validity was adequate; most “physical” items of the new questionnaire showed significant correlations with the bodily pain and role physical SF-36 subscales and most “psychical” and “social” items were correlated with mental health and social functioning SF-36 subscales. Criterion validity was adequate, with headache severity being correlated with most of the items. Discussion - In this study the new headache-specific quality of life instrument showed adequate psychometric properties.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Earlier and more efficiently: the role of deep brain stimulation for parkinson’s disease preserving the working capabilities]

DELI Gabriella, BALÁS István, KOMOLY Sámuel, DÓCZI Tamás, JANSZKY József, ASCHERMANN Zsuzsanna, NAGY Ferenc, BOSNYÁK Edit, KOVÁCS Norbert

[Background – The recently published “EarlyStim” study demonstrated that deep brain stimulation (DBS) for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease (PD) with early fluctuations is superior to the optimal pharmacological treatment in improving the quality of life and motor symptoms, and preserving sociocultural position. Our retrospective investigation aimed to evaluate if DBS therapy was able to preserve the working capabilities of our patients. Methods – We reviewed the data of 39 young (<60 years-old) PD patients who underwent subthalamic DBS implantation at University of Pécs and had at least two years follow-up. Patients were categorized into two groups based on their working capabilities: Patients with active job (“Job+” group, n=15) and retired patients (without active job, “Job-” group, n=24). Severity of motor symptoms (UPDRS part 3), quality of life (EQ-5D) and presence of active job were evaluated one and two years after the operation. Results – As far as the severity of motor symptoms were concerned, similar (approximately 50%) improvement was achieved in both groups. However, the postoperative quality of life was significantly better in the Job+ group. Majority (12/15, 80%) of Job+ group members were able to preserve their job two years after the operation. However, only a minimal portion (1/24, 4.2%) of the Job- group members was able to return to the world of active employees (p<0.01, McNemar test). Conclusion – Although our retrospective study has several limitations, our results fit well with the conclusions of “EarlyStim” study. Both of them suggest that with optimal timing of DBS implantation we may preserve the working capabilities of our patients.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

[End of the line? Addenda to the health and social care career of psychiatric patients living in Hungary’s asylums]

KAPÓCS Gábor, BACSÁK Dániel

[The authors are focusing on a special type of long term psychiatric care taking place in Hungary outside of the conventional mental health care system, by introducing some institutional aspects of the not well known world of so called social homes for psychiatric patients (asylums). After reviewing several caracteristics of institutional development of psychiatric care in Hun­gary based on selected Hungarian and in­ternational historical sources, the main struc­tural data of present Hungarian institutional capacities of psychiatric health and social care services are shown. Finally, the authors based on own personal experiences describe several functional ascpects of the largest existing asylum in EU, a so­cial home for long term care of psychiatric pa­tients. By the beginning of the 20th century, Hungarian psychiatric institutions were operating on an infrastructure of three large mental hospitals standing alone and several psychiatric wards incorporated into hospitals. Nevertheless, at the very first session of the Psychiatrists’ Conference held in 1900 many professionals gave warning: mental institutions were overcrowded and the quality of care provided in psychiatric hospital wards, many of which located in the countryside of Hungary, in most cases was far from what would have been professionally acceptable. The solution was seen in the building of new independent mental hospitals and the introduction of a family nursing institution already established in Western Europe; only the latter measure was implemented in the first half of the 20th century but with great success. However, as a result of the socio-political-economic-ideological turn following the Second World War, the institution of family nursing was dismantled while different types of psychiatric care facilities were developed, such as institutionalised hospital and outpatient care. In the meantime, a new type of institution emerged in the 1950s: the social home for psychiatric pa­tients, which provided care for approximately the same number of chronic psychiatric patients nationwide as the number of functioning hospital beds for acute psychiatric patients. This have not changed significantly since, while so­cial homes for psychiatric patients are perhaps less visible to the professional and lay public nowadays, altough their operational conditions are deteriorating of late years. Data show, that for historical reasons the current sys­tem of inpatient psychiatric care is proportionately arranged between health care and social care institutions; each covering one third. Further research is needed to fully explore and understand the current challenges that the system of psychiatric care social- and health care institu­tions are facing. An in-depth analysis would significantly contribute to the comprehensive improvement of the quality of services and the quality of lives of patients, their relatives and the health- and social care professionals who support them. ]

Clinical Neuroscience

[The quality of life of the cluster headache patients during the active phase of the headache]

DIÓSSY Mária, BALOGH Eszter, MAGYAR Máté, GYÜRE Tamás, CSÉPÁNY Éva, BOZSIK György, ERTSEY Csaba

[Introduction - Cluster headache (CH), which affects 0.1% of the population, is one of the most painful human conditions: despite adequate treatment, the frequent and severe headaches cause a significant burden to the patients. According to a small number of previous studies, CH has a serious negative effect on the sufferers’ quality of life (QOL). In the current study, we set out to examine the quality of life of the CH patients attending our outpatient service between 2013 and 2016, using generic and headache-specific QOL instruments. Methods - A total of 42 CH patients (16 females and 26 males; mean age: 39.1±13.5 years) completed the SF-36 generic QOL questionnaire and the headache- specific CHQQ questionnaire (Comprehensive Headache- related Quality of life Questionnaire), during the active phase of their headache. Their data were compared to those of patients suffering from chronic tension type headache (CTH) and to data obtained from controls not suffering from significant forms of headache, using Kruskal-Wallis tests. Results - During the active phase of the CH, the patients’ generic QOL was significantly worse than that of normal controls in four of the 8 domains of the SF-36 instrument. Apart from a significantly worse result in the ‘Bodily pain’ SF-36 domain, there were no significant differences between the CH patients’ and the CTH patients’ results. All the dimensions and the total score of the headache-specific CHQQ instrument showed significantly worse QOL in the CH group than in the CTH group or in the control group. Conclusion - Cluster headache has a significant negative effect on the quality of life. The decrease of QOL experienced by the patients was better reflected by the headache-specific CHQQ instrument than by the generic SF-36 instrument. ]