Hypertension and nephrology

[The Classics of Hypertonology 4. – Professor John H. Laragh, 1924-2015]

KÉKES Ede

DECEMBER 10, 2015

Hypertension and nephrology - 2015;19(06)

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Hypertension and nephrology

[Diagnostic of genetic factors affecting blood pressure and the genetic risk factorsof hypertension]

LACZIKÓ Dorottya, RÉPÁSI Eszter, RZEPIEL Andrea, KEREKES Éva, SHENKER-HORVÁTH Kinga, KOLLER Ákos, ELBERT Gábor, NAGY Zsolt B.

[Hypertension is a risk factor of cardiovascular and renal diseases. Although high blood pressure usually does not show symptoms, it can lead to serious health problems such as stroke or cardio and renal insufficiency. Globally 40% of adults over the age of 24 suffer from hypertension, and the risk increases with age. The incidence is more than 70% over 65 years of age. Environmental and genetic effects are jointly responsible for the onset of hypertension, thereby determining predisposing genes is extremely difficult. Genetic variations of several genes have been identified to increase the risk of hypertension. The most common hypertension susceptibility polymorphisms occur in AGT, AGTR1, ACE, NOS3 and CYP4A11 genes. Learning about polymorphisms has clinical importance both in prevention and therapeutic processes. Therapeutic and lifestyle recommendations can be individualized by using molecular genetic tests such us PCR, microarrays, real-time PCR.]

Hypertension and nephrology

[The Worldwide and Hungarian Prevalence of Hypertension According to the 2014 WHO Database]

KÉKES Ede

Hypertension and nephrology

[Carvedilol in Association with Comorbidities in Antihypertensive Therapy]

SIMONYI Gábor

Hypertension and nephrology

[Beetroot May Provide Sustained Blood Pressure Lowering]

VÁLYI Péter

Hypertension and nephrology

[Role of nephroclinicopathology in the nephrological diagnosis]

NAGY Judit, KEMÉNY Éva, IVÁNYI Béla

[In cases where a definitive diagnosis of a renal disease cannot be established on the basis of the clinical and laboratory data as well as imaging techniques the histological examination of the renal biopsy can be useful for establishing a pathological diagnosis, assessing the prognosis and can give etiopathogenetic information to guide the further management. The description and the degree of the active and chronic changes may influence the rationale treatment and the likelihood of the response. However, discussion between the nephrologist and the nephropathologist is indispensable at the decision to take the biopsy and at the evaluation of the result of the histological examination.]

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[In Part I, I summarised the beginnings, the theoretical background and the international experiences of peritoneal dialysis. Hungarian publications related to peritoneal dialysis in the 1950s were focusing on the role of the method in the treatment of chronic renal disorders. The first dialysis centres were established in the medical universities of Hungary (Szeged in 1955, Budapest in 1960, Pécs in 1964, Debrecen in 1970) and in Miskolc in 1968. Despite the restricted hemodialysis capacities the intermittent technique of peritoneal dialysis did not spread in accordance with the demand. A survey conducted at the beginning of the 1970’s in the territory of the five counties with 1.5 million inhabitants revealed that considering the numbers of patients with renal diseases requiring dialysis, developing of a network of care and increasing the dialysis capacities is necessary and so is the development of a system of szatellite peritoneal dialysis, which was implemented with our support in 10 units of the county hospitals. A devoted and enthusiastic organiser of the nation-wide system of peritoneal dialysis was professor Taraba, who, due to his untimely death, was deprived of seeing the nation-wide spread of CAPD. At the beginning of the 1980’s the first reports on the favourable effects of CAPD appeared in Hungary. Solutions prepared in pharmacies and the lack of up-to-date equipment resulted in the frequent occurrence of peritonitis. In addition, the unfavourable memories of dialysis performed with bottled solutions (long treatment times, frequently peritonitis) were still vivid among patients and colleagues supervising the treatment. As a consequence, our survey conducted in 1991 revealed that the spread of CAPD all over the world in Hungary resulted in a significant increase of those treated with the intermittent method (more than 10% of the dialysis patients), while those treated with CAPD remained under 2%. Several reports on CAPD and the consequences that followed from them as well as the further training organised in the Szent Margit Hospital, Budapest and in Gánt, and also the guidelines issued by the Society of Hungarian Nephrologists the number of those treated with dialysis has exceeded 6000 in the past decade. 10% of them received CAPD/APD treatment.]

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