Hypertension and nephrology

[Predictive factors for ischemic heart disease, diabetes mellitus and chronic kidney disease among hypertensive patients based on the data of the Hungarian Hypertension Registry 2011-2013-2015. Part I. Hypertensive population aged 35 to 64 years]

KÉKES Ede, PAKSY András, SZEGEDI János, JÁRAI Zoltán

DECEMBER 12, 2019

Hypertension and nephrology - 2019;23(06)

DOI: https://doi.org/10.33668/hn.23.029

[The association of hypertension with ischemic heart disease, diabetes and chronic kidney disease is the greatest therapeutic challenge because these associations significantly increase mortality and deteriorate life expectancy. It is important for the clinician to clarify the predictive factors of each association for successful prevention or slowing the progression of diseases. According to the database of the Hungarian Hypertension Registry 2011-2013-2015, 11,137 men and 11,112 women with hypertension and comorbidities (CHD, diabetes, CKD) aged between 35 and 64 were analyzed for the purpose of assessing the predictive value of the traditional risk factors in co-morbidity. We analyzed the predictive weight of each variable with single- and multi-variable stepwise logistic regression, and reported Odds ratio (OR, odds ratio). In patients with hypertension aged 35-64 (male / female), the prevalence of CHD was 41.6% / 35.8%, diabetes 27.1% / 23% and KVB 16.2% / 33.8%, respectively. The chance of developing CHD is highest in hypertensive individuals (male/female) who have diabetes (OR 1.30/1.48), who are obese (OR 1.22/1.21), who smoke (OR 1.50/1.51), and whose blood pressure >140/90 mmHg (OR 1.23/1.29). The dominant predictive factors of type 2 diabetes are obesity (visceral obesity) (OR 1.46/1.49), low HDL cholesterol (OR 1.32/1.35), and high triglyceride levels (OR 1.20/1.42); in women the uric acid level also showed high odds ratio (OR 1.39). There is a significant chance of developing chronic kidney disease in hypertension in both sexes, if abnormal uric acid levels (OR 1.73/1.46) and inadequate treatment of high blood pressure (>140Hgmm SBP) (OR 1.43/1.19) are present. In women, the abnormal triglyceride level) also showed a high odd (OR 1.81).]

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