Hypertension and nephrology

[Managing medical quality and patient safety in an international dialysis network]

TÖRÖK Marietta, OROSZ Attila, CHARLOTTA Wollheim, JÖRGEN Hegbrant

DECEMBER 10, 2013

Hypertension and nephrology - 2013;17(05-06)

[A dialysis provider’s core activities include providing dialysis care with excellent quality, ensuring a low variability across the clinic network and ensuring strong focus on patient safety. In this article, we summarize the pertinent components of the quality assurance and safety program of the Diaverum Renal Services Group. Concerning medical performance, the key components of a successful quality program are setting treatment targets; implementing evidence- based guidelines and clinical protocols and revising targets, guidelines and clinical protocols based on sound scientific data. Consistently, regularly, prospectively and accurately collecting data from all clinics in the network; processing collected data to provide feedback to clinics in a timely manner. The key activities for ensuring patient safety include a standardized approach to education, i.e. a uniform education program including control of theoretical knowledge and clinical competencies; implementation of clinical policies and procedures in the organization in order to reduce variability and potential defects in clinic practice. We point out the importance of auditing clinical practice on a regular basis. By applying a standardized and systematic continuous quality improvement approach throughout the entire organization, it has been possible for Diaverum to progressively improve medical performance and ensure patient safety]

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Hypertension and nephrology

[Monitoring of effectiveness of ramipril-amlodipine fixed combination, a non-interventional trial (Ramona study). Subgroup analysis of patients with chronic kidney disease]

SIMONYI Gábor

[Hypertension and chronic kidney disease are independent cardiovascular risk factors. The 5th Cardiovascular Consensus Conference has recommended chronic kidney disease in high-risk category. In chronic kidney disease hypertension is observed in most cases. In patients with chronic kidney disease blood pressure targets are as 140/90 mmHg blood pressure below must be achieved without overt proteinuria. In chronic kidney disease combined antihypertensive therapy treatment should be initiated according the Hungarian Society of Hypertension recommendations. Aims: Monitoring the effectiveness and safety of the fix combination of ramipril/amlodipine Egiramlon® therapy in chronic kidney disease suffering from mild or moderate hypertension despite antihypertensive treatment. Patients and methods: Open, prospective, phase IV clinical observational study, which involved known chronic kidney disease (age over 18 years) with mild or moderate hypertension. Ramipril/amlodipine fixed combination (5/5, 5/10, 10/5 or, 10/10 mg) were administered or titrated in three visits, during the 4 months of trial period. The doses of the fixed combination drugs were determined individually during the visits by the 923 physicians involved in the study. The target blood pressure value was <140/90 mmHg according the new guidelines of ESH/ESC. Results: 70.1% of total patient (9169) was fulfilled the protocol during the four month of trial (6423 patients). In this population 194 patients suffered from chronic kidney disease. The age of patients was 68.52±1.84 (mean±SD) years, 85 (43.8) women and 109 (56.2%) men. 74.74% of total patients with chronic kidney disease has reached target blood pressure at the end of 4th month (primary endpoint). The blood pressure has decreased significantly (all p<0.0001) from 158.04/90.46±9.97/8.30 mmHg (1. visit) to 138.77/82.12±10.68/7.21 mmHg 2. visit and to 130.40/78.59±7.56/5.75 at the and of trial (3. visit), it means -27.64/- 11.87 mmHg decrease from the beginning of the 4th Month (3. visit). eGFR level increased significantly from 46.3±16.49 ml/min/1,73m2 to 49.0±19.58 ml/min/1,73m2. Patients suffered from chronic kidney disease have tolerated well the various doses of fixed combination of ramipril/amlodipine, and adverse events have no occurred correlation of treatment.]

Hypertension and nephrology

[Training With and Against Hypertension ]

APOR Péter

Hypertension and nephrology

[Non-Medicinal, Non-Lifestyle Treatments in Hypertension ]

LÉGRÁDY Péter, BAJCSI Dóra, FEJES Imola, ÁBRAHÁM György

Hypertension and nephrology

[Relationship of Adipokins with Diurnal Changes in Blood Pressure ]

KOVÁCS Imre, TARJÁN Jenő, HEGEDŰS Zoltán, VÉGH Tibor, HORVÁTH Judit, KERN András, KOVÁCS Nóra, KOLLER Ákos

Hypertension and nephrology

[Early histopathological changes in new onset diabetes mellitus after renal transplantation]

IBRAHIM Munir Yasmin, BORDA Bernadett, LENGYEL Csaba, VÁRKONYI Tamás, KEMÉNY Éva, SZABÓ Viktor, KUBIK András, LÁZÁR György

[Introduction: New-onset diabetes after transplantation (NODAT) is one of the most common complications following kidney transplantation. The diagnosis of NODAT is often late or missed, therefore it impairs the implanted renal allograft. Patients and methods: Patients were randomized to receive cyclosporine A- or tacrolimusbased immunosuppression. One year after the transplantation, fasting and oral glucose tolerance tests were performed, and the patients were assigned to one of the following three groups based on the results: normal, impaired fasting glucose/impaired glucose tolerance (IFG/IGT), NODAT. Age, laboratory results, renal function, morphological abnormalities, and changes in the Banff score were evaluated. Results: NODAT developed in 14% of patients receiving cyclosporine A-based immunosuppression and in 26% of patients taking tacrolimus (p=0.0002). Albumin levels were similar, but uric acid level (p=0.002) and the age of the recipient (p=0.003) were significantly different between the diabetic and the normal group. The evaluation of renal function showed no significant differences in case of serum creatinine level, eGFR, and urea level. Evaluation of tissue samples revealed that acute cellular rejection (ACR) and interstitial fibrosis/ tubular atrophy (IF/TA) were significantly different in the NODAT group. Changes in the Banff score provided significant difference regarding tubulitis (“t”) and interstitial inflammation (“i”) (p=0.05). Discussion: The pathological effect of new-onset diabetes after kidney transplantation can be detected in the morphology of the renal allograft earlier, before any signs of functional impairment.]

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[Risk estimates of advanced chronic kidney disease and predicting mortality in dialyzed patients]

KULCSÁR Imre, KULCSÁR Dalma

[In mostly the second part of the last decade lots of epidemiological study have been released about the progression of the chronic kidney disease (CKD) and theirs connection with the risk of death. The fact that lots of nephrologist from all over the world (from Canada to New-Zealand) are pretty much interested in this topic is absolutely proved by national (REIN Study – French Registry) and international (KDIGO Controversies Conference, DOPPS 1-5, or the European AROII Study) researchers with these epidemiological questions in their focus. The risk estimation facts that are able to show the life expectancy of patients with CKD 3-5 (expected time to dialysis or mortality risk before renal replacement therapy – RRT) and the early or hopefully longer survival odds of the dialyzed ones could be very useful not only for the medical stuff but also for the patients. In case of the predialyzed patients the focus has to be on the Bansal score and also on the Kidney Failure Risk Equation (KFRE) scores (with 4 and 8 variable); on the other hand in dialyzed patients the REIN score that prognose a short-term survival and the Cohen model (both are easy calculated with webcalculators) are in the highlight of importance. There is not a big difference (2- 7%) in validated researches between the prognosed and the real survival dates. Despite of this prediction has to always be evaluated individually in favour of the best decision we can make for the patients and in order to choose the right treatment: conservative therapy, dialysis or transplantation.]

Hypertension and nephrology

[The significance of depressive disorders in patients with chronic kidney diseases]

ZALAI Dóra Márta, SZEIFERT Lilla, NOVÁK Márta

[In this article a practice-oriented narrative review of the depressive disorders in chronic kidney disease is provided. Depressive disorders affect approximately one fourth of the chronic kidney disease population. These mental disorders interfere with physical, cognitive and social functioning and are associated with poor prognosis of patients with chronic kidney disease. Bio-psycho-social factors, including immuno-inflammatory processes, disturbance in glucose- insulin homeostasis, sleep disorders, chronic pain, sexual difficulties, changes in social roles, losses in multiple areas of life and low social support increase the risk for the development of depression. Routine, regular screening of depression in the chronic kidney disease population seems to be warranted. Only limited published evidence is available on the therapeutic possibilities of depression in chronic kidney disease. Preliminary evidence indicates that short, structured psychotherapy may be effective for acute treatment and prevention of psychological distress. Some antidepressants can be applied without the need for dose adjustments. On the other hand, some of the psychotropic medications require dose reduction or should be avoided.]

Hypertension and nephrology

[Dietary treatment of dialysis patients]

ZAKAR Gábor

[Adequate nutritional indices and intake are the corner stone of long term success of renal replecement therapies (hemo- and peritoneal dialysis, transplantation) characterized by favourable survial rates and a good quality of life. There has been no major change in basic principles of nutritional prescription (protein, energy, fluid intake, restriction of sodium, potassium and phosphorous), increasing emphasis has been placed on the reduction of calcium load and ”native” vitamin-D therapy in these patients. Less avareness has been put however in the past ten years (according to recent metaanalyses) on the role and replacement of the full scale of vitamins, in spite of their occasionally altered metabolism and replacement-requirements in ESRD patients. Usually there is a need for their replacement, but some of them are represented in abundant, sometimes toxic amounts in commercially available multivitamin preparates. With in the scope of general aspects of nutrition in ESRD patients, the article gives a detalied overview of their multivitamin recommendations and alternatives of a specified substition.]

Hypertension and nephrology

[Prominents in Hungarian nephrology Professor Gyula Petrányi (1912-2000). Part II]

SZALAY László

[A nation can only survive and keep its identity through its traditions. This is why the initiative to launch this series coming from professor János Radó is worthy of attention. Gyula Petrányi is an outstanding personality in 20th century internal medicine, to be more precise in nephrology and immunology, his activity being wide-ranging. The first part of the current summary of his work deals with a tribute to his personality, and his role in immunomodularity treatment in glomerulonephritis. The second part shall cover his role in spreading renal biopsy, screening and caring kidney patients, dialysis, in developing kidney patients’ care, furthermore in clinicopharmacology and renal transplantation.]

Hypertension and nephrology

[Covid-19 and the kidney]

PATÓ Éva, DEÁK György

[Covid-19 pandemy has emerged from Wuhan, China in December 2019. The infection affects not only the lung but other organs such as the kidney, as well. The relation between Covid-19 infection and the kidney is bidirectional. On one hand, Covid-19 infection may cause kidney damage in 50-75% of the cases resulting in proteinuria, haematuria and acute kidney injury (AKI). The etiology of AKI is multifactorial. Main pathogenic mechanisms are direct proximal tubular cell damage, sepsis-related haemodinamic derangement, citokine storm and hypercoagulability. The virus enters proximal tubular cells and podocytes via the ACE2 receptor followed by multiplication in the lysomes and consequential cell lesion. Histopathology shows acute tubular necrosis and acute tubulointerstitial nephritis. AKI is a strong predictor of mortality in critically ill patients. On the other hand, the risk of Covid-19 infection and mortality is substantially increased in patients with chronic kidney disease – especially in those with a kidney transplant or on dialysis – due to their immunocompromised status. Among haemodialysis patients, infection may spread very easily due to the possibility of getting contacted in the ambulance car or at the dialysis unit. The mortality rate of patients on renal replacement therapy with Covid-19 infection is 20-35%. In order to avoid mass infection it is obligatory to employ preventive measures and implement restricions along with (cohors) isolation of infected patients. In Hungary, every dialysis or kidney transplant patient with Covid-19 infection should be admitted to dedicated Covid-19 wards.]