Hypertension and nephrology

[Accredited Postgraduate Training]

OCTOBER 23, 2019

Hypertension and nephrology - 2019;23(05)

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Hypertension and nephrology

[Blood pressure management for stroke prevention and in the acute stroke. The new guideline of European Society of Hypertension (ESH, 2018), European Society of Cardiology and Hungarian Society of Hypertension (HSH, 2018)]

JENEI Zoltán

[Hypertension is the leading modifiable risk factor for stroke. Its prevalence amongst stroke patient is about 60-70% and the benefit of blood pressure (BP) lowering therapy on stroke risk reduction is well established. However the optimal BP targets for preventing stroke and reducing stroke consequences have been controversial. The new European (ESC/ESH) and Hungarian (HSH) hypertension guideline published in 2018 highlighted the primary and secondary prevention of stroke and the BP management in the acute stroke care as well. According results from ACCORD, SPRINT, HOPE-3, and other metaanalysis the systolic blood pressure (SBP) lowering < 120 mmHg has not favourable effect, thus in hypertensive patients < 65 years the SBP should be lowered to a BP range of 120-129 mmHg. In older patients ≥ 65 years the SBP should be targeted to a BP range of 130-139 mmHg (IA). In patients with acute intracerebral haemorrhage careful acute BP lowering with iv. therapy, to <180 mmHg should be considered only in case of SBP ≥ 220 mmHg (IIaB). In patients with acute ischaemic stroke who are eligible for iv. thrombolysis, BP should be carefully lowered and maintained to < 180/105 mmHg for at least the first 24 h after thrombolysis (IIaB). If the patient is not eli gible for lysis and BP ≤ 220/110 mmHg, routine BP lowering drug therapy is not recommended inside 48-72 h (IA). In patients with markedly elevated BP > 220/110 mmHg who do not receive fibrinolysis, drug therapy may be considered, based on clinical judgement, to reduce BP by 15% during the first 24 h after the stroke onset (IIbC). After 72 h of acute stroke in case of hypertensive patients < 65 years the SBP should be lowered to a BP range of 120-129 mmHg (IIaB). In older patients ≥ 65 years the SBP should be targeted to a BP range of 130-139 mmHg (IA). If BP < 140/90 mmHg after stroke, the BP lowering should be considered (IIbA). It is recommended to initiate an antihypertensive treatment with combination, preferably single pill combination of renin-angiotensin system blockers plus a calcium channel blocker and/or a thiazide like diuretics (IA). Lowering SBP < 120 mmHg is not recommended due to advers events regardless of age and type of stroke either in primary or secondary stroke prevention.]

Hypertension and nephrology

[The importance of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in psychopathology and cardiovascular conditions: psychosomatic connections]

LÁSZLÓ Andrea, LÉNÁRT Lilla, ILLÉSY Lilla, FEKETE Andrea, NEMCSIK János

[Cardiovascular diseases and mood disorders are common public health problems worldwide. Their connections are widely studied, and the role of neurotrophins, especially brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is already supposed in both conditions. However, no reviews are available describing possible associations between cardiovascular risk and mood disorders based on BDNF. Decreased level of BDNF is observed in depression and its connection to hypertension has also been demonstrated with affecting the arterial baroreceptors, reninangiotensin system and endothelial nitric oxide synthase activity. BDNF was also found to be the predictor of cardiovascular outcome in different patient populations. Our aim was to overview the present knowledge in this area demonstrating a new aspect of the associations between mood disorders and cardiovascular diseases through the mediation of BDNF. These findings might enlighten a new psychosomatic connection and suggest a new therapeutic target that is beneficial both in respect of mood disorders and cardiovascular pathology.]

Hypertension and nephrology

[Congress Report of the 27th Congress of the Hungarian Society of Hypertension ]

CSEPREKÁL Orsolya

Hypertension and nephrology

[Report on the 56th Congress of the European Renal Association-European Dialysis and Transplant Association (ERA-EDTA) ]

HARIS Ágnes

Hypertension and nephrology

[Hyperuricemia as a cardiovascular risk factor: novelties in therapeutic guidelines]

ALFÖLDI Sándor

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Clinical Neuroscience

How to minimize the risk for headache? A lumbar puncture practice questionnaire study

JONATAN Salzer, RAJDA Cecilia, SUNDSTRÖM Peter, MATTIAS Vågberg, VÉCSEI László, ANDERS Svenningsson

Background - To lower the risk for post lumbar puncture (LP) headache the American Academy of Neurology (AAN) recommended using small bore atraumatic needles together with stylet reinsertion in a report from 2005. It is unclear whether these recommendations are followed or not. Objectives - To investigate the diagnostic LP preferences with respect to the AAN guidelines among neurologists by use of a short online questionnaire, and to review previously published literature on the subject. Results - A total of 284 respondents who performed diagnostic LPs completed the questionnaire. Almost half (41%) answered that they always use atraumatic needles. The most common reason (73%) for not using atraumatic needles was that these were not available. Less than half of the respondents who performed LPs had knowledge about the AAN guidelines for diagnostic LPs, and 48-76% agreed with the different recommendations therein. Five previously (1998-2015) published studies investigating LP practice among neurologists were identified. The reported frequency of atraumatic needle use (always/routinely) varied between 2 and 16%. Discussion - Atraumatic needle use was more common in this study compared with previous publications. There is still skepticism regarding some of the AAN recommendations, and needle availability appears to be the most important factor preventing atraumatic needle use. To increase the use of atraumatic needles we may perform additional studies investigating their potential benefits, and arrange training sessions for neurologists to increase their awareness and level of comfort with the atraumatic LP technique.

Clinical Neuroscience

[The Expanded Disability Status Scale scoring in patients with multiple sclerosis]

FÜVESI Judit

[Gait disturbance is a major symptom in patients with multiple sclerosis. The Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) was first used in clinical trials of multiple sclerosis for the assessment of disability, however it has become more and more widely used in clinical practice as well. Nowadays its use is essential in application of the new diagnostic criteria, the new clinical form classification and in monitoring the efficacy of therapies. EDSS is based on a standardised neurological examination, but focuses on those symptoms that are frequent in multiple sclerosis. Based on the examination it assesses seven functional systems: visual, brainstem, pyramidal, cerebellar, sensory, bowel-bladder and cerebral functions. EDSS scores can be determined based on the scores given in the functional systems and on testing the walking distance. In newer versions the “Ambulation score” has been added. This chapter clarifies the scores based on the maximal walking distance and the need for a walking aid to walk this distance. The Neurostatus/EDSS training method improves the reproducibility of the standardised neurological examination that forms the basis of the EDSS scoring. Of the tests assessing walking, the Timed-25 Foot Walk Test and the self-administered 12-Item Multiple Sclerosis Walking Scale are suitable for routine evaluation of walking performance. An increase of more than 20% in the Timed-25 Foot Walk may be considered a significant change in gait. ]

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Education and psychological support of parents in cases of postnatally detected Down syndrome]

MÁTÉ Orsolya, KÍVÉS Zsuzsanna, OLÁH András, FULLÉR Noémi, PAKAI Annamária

[OBJECTIVE - Since the 60’s several publications dealt with the phenomenon how physicians inform parents of newborns about postnatal recognition of Down’s syndrome and the support they receive right after breaking the bad news. Howe - ver, the rest of these studies concentrated on surveying parental satisfaction, while relatively few international studies deal with the other side of the communicational situation, the opinion of the informer. Our study focused on the circumstances of parental information in Hungarian institutions of obstetrics in order to evaluate the possibilities for interventions. METHODS - The Down’s team operating at the University of Pécs Faculty of Health Sciences carried out a national survey in 2005 - an interview-based questionnaire filled by physicians of institutions of obstetrics - with the help of the National Register for Congenital Diseases of the National Centre for Epidemiology and Down’s Foun dation. RESULTS - The coverage of the survey reached 74%. Rest of the surveyed institutions did not have information protocol, however, 70% of them believes it would be necessary. Only 44% of the physicians received communication training and 81% of them believe they can manage communication, 33% have felt that the mother of a newborn with Down’s syndrome would expect special help that the institutions are unable to provide. CONCLUSION - There are serious problems with the circumstances of parental informing in Hungarian institutions of obstetrics. This situation would obviously require intervention. An aimed communicational training based on international experience and exploiting the openness of physicians, as well as the establishment of information protocol could be elements of such intervention.]

Clinical Neuroscience

Relationship between Status Epilepticus Severity Score and etiology in adult NCSE patients

GENC Fatma, ERDAL Abidin, AKCA Gizem, KARACAY Ertan, GÖKSU Özaydın Eylem, KUTLU Gülnihal, GÖMCELI Bicer Yasemin

Purpose - Nonconvulsive status epilepticus (NCSE) is a heterogeneous, severe neurological disorder of different etiologies. In this study, the outcomes of NCSE episodes was assessed in a large series of adult patients. Our objective was to evaluate relationship between Status Epilepticus Severity Score (STESS) and etiology and the role of etiological factors on predicting the outcomes. Method - In this retrospective study, the medical records of 95 patients over 18 years of age who were diagnosed with NCSE between June 2011 and December 2015 were reviewed. Their treatment and follow-up for NCSE was performed at the Epilepsy Unit in Department of Neurology, Antalya Research and Training Hospital. Etiological factors thought to be responsible for NCSE episodes as well as the prognostic data were retrieved. The etiological factors were classified into three groups as those with a known history of epilepsy (Group 1), primary neurological disorder (Group 2), or systemic/unknown etiology (Group 3). STESS was retrospectively applied to patients. Results - There were 95 participants, 59 of whom were female. Group 1, Group 2, and Group 3 consisted of 11 (7 female), 54 (33 female), and 30 (19 female) patients, respectively. Of the 18 total deaths, 12 occurred in Group 2, and 6 in Group 3. The negative predictive value for a STESS score of ≤ 2 was 93.88% (+LR 2.05 95% CI: 1.44-2.9 and -LR 0.3 95% CI 0.10-0.84 ) in the overall study group. While the corresponding values for Group 1 (patients with epilepsy), Group 2 (patients with primary neurological disorder), and group 3 (patients with systemic or unknown etiology) were 100%, 92.59% (+LR 2.06 95%CI: 1.32-3.21 and -LR 0.28 95% CI 0.08-1.02 ) 83.33% (+LR 1.14 95%CI: 0.59-2.9 and -LR 0.80 95% CI 0.23-2.73). Conclusions - This study included the one of the largest patients series ever reported in whom STESS, a clinical scoring system proposed for use in patients with status epilepticus, has been implemented. Although STESS appeared to be quite useful for predicting a favorable outcome in NCSE patients with epilepsy and primary neurological disorders, its predictive value in patients with systemic or unknown etiology was lower. Further prospective studies including larger NCSE samples are warranted.

Clinical Neuroscience

Role of positioning between trunk and pelvis in locomotor function of ambulant children with and without cerebral palsy

SANZ-MENGIBAR Manuel Jose, SANTONJA-MEDINA Fernando

Purpose - To understand if children with and without cerebral palsy share the same lumbar postural control threshold on the sagittal plane for the transition between each walking locomotor stage. Method - Observational analysis of sagittal trunk-pelvis kinematics of 97 children with cerebral palsy and 73 with typical development, according to their locomotor stage. Results - Among children with typical development, all average and minimum measurements of the sagittal lumbar curve during the gait events were correlated with age and the locomotor stages of development. Among children with cerebral palsy, there were significant correlations between all average and minimum values of the sagittal lumbar curve and locomotor stages of development but not age. Conclusions - We conclude that, for the same locomotor level, there are no common postural patterns between children with typical development and those with spastic bilateral cerebral palsy for the position between trunk and pelvis in the sagittal plane. Maximal lordosis reduction between trunk and pelvis may change with age or even training, but does not make a positive effect on the locomotor level, while basal and maintenance capacities could explain locomotor function. Trials that failed to assess quality of movement may now have a better understanding of how different interventions improve posture towards the next functional level.