Clinical Neuroscience

[Posterior ischaemic optic neuropathy]

BOÓR Krisztina1, KOVÁCS Krisztina1, RÓZSA Anikó1, PÁNCZÉL Gyula1, SZILVÁSSY Ildikó2, GÁCS Gyula3

JUNE 02, 2009

Clinical Neuroscience - 2009;62(05-06)

[Here one case report of the posterior ischaemic optic neuropathy, a rare and underdiagnosed form of the non arteritic ischaemic optic neuropathy is presented, to underline the value of the MRI in the diagnosis. The ischaemic optic neuropathy is the infarction of the optic nerve. Depending on the affected segment of optic nerve (optic nerve head or retrobulbar segment) two subclasses exist: the anterior (AION) and the posterior (PION) ischaemic optic neuropathy. Ischaemic optic neuropathy characterized by sudden, painless, mononuclear loss of vision, and/or visual field defect, that is accompanied by a diagnostic picture of the optic disc fundus only in the case of the AION. The diagnosis of the PION is based on a diagnosis of exclusion described by Hayreh in 1981. The macular and retinal laesions, the etiological role of toxic agent, the compression and the inflammation of the optic nerve all have to be excluded. The differential diagnosis between the PION and the retrobulbar neuritis is more difficult. Nowadays, in addition to the case history and the clinical data the diagnosis of the PION could be confirmed with help of VEP (visual evoked potential) and MRI. In the case of an old woman who had a sudden, painless visual loss of left eye we confirmed the diagnosis of PION with MRI which was presumed after had excluding other etiological factors.]

AFFILIATIONS

  1. Péterfy Sándor Utcai Kórház-Rendelôintézet és Baleseti Központ, Neurológiai Osztály, Budapest
  2. XVI. Kerület Kertvárosi Egészségügyi Szolgálata, Szemészet, Budapest
  3. Péterfy Sándor Utcai Kórház-Rendelôintézet és Baleseti Központ, Neurológiai Nappali Kórház és Speciális Neurológiai Ambulancia, Budapest

COMMENTS

0 comments

Further articles in this publication

Clinical Neuroscience

[Genetics and present therapy options in Parkinson’s disease: a review]

BEREZNAI Benjámin, MOLNÁR Mária Judit

[In the past years, six monogenic forms of Parkinson disease have clearly been associated with this movement disorder. The most frequent forms are LRRK2- and Parkin-associated Parkinson disease. Currently, a genetic diagnosis does not change the therapy, the genes involved in genetic Parkinson disease help to understand the underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms of Parkinson disease. Beside the overview of the molecular-genetic basis, we give a review about genetic testing, pharmacological and other multidisciplinary treatment options.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Presidential report about the activity of the Hungarian Society of Neurology and Psychiatry 2004-2009]

VÉCSEI László

Clinical Neuroscience

[99-mTc-HMPAO single photon emission computed tomography examinations in genetically determined neurometabolic disorders]

ARANKA László, AMBRUS Edit, VÖRÖS Erika, SVEKUS András, KÓBOR Jenõ, BEREG Edit, PALATKA János, PÁVICS László

[The aim of our study was to determine regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) abnormalities in different types of enzymopathies. Patients and methods - Among the patients with genetically determined enzymopathies 3 patients had aminoacidopathies, and 11 had different types of encephalopathies, from which 10 had mitochondrial encephalomyopathy (MEMP), and 1 patient had hyperuricaemic encephalopathy. Besides the mentioned 14 patients, 1 had ceroid lipofuscinosis and another patient had tuberous sclerosis. The further distribution of the MEMP patients’ group was the following - 5 patients had MEMP with lactic acidosis, 5 had Leigh’s disease (subacute necrotizing encephalopathy), from which 1 had cytochrome-c-oxidase deficiency (COX). Additionally in all patients were performed cerebral MRI and SPECT examination 10 min. after intravenous administration of 20 Mbq/kg 99 mTc-HMPAO. Results - Fourteen out of 16 SPECT findings were pathologic, showing decreased focal frontal/temporal/temporoparietal cerebral blood perfusion. Aminoacidopathic group - all the 3 patients revealed pathologic signs from the aminoacidopathic patients’ group. Among them the ornithine transcarbamylase (OTC) heterozygous female patient with left-sided hemiparesis caused by hyperammonemic stroke at 10 month-age, showed right sided temporoparietal, occipital and left frontal hypoperfusion, nearly 6 years after the cerebral vascular attack. This finding might be resulted because of diaschisis. Mitochondrial encephalo-myopathic (MEMP) group - all the four patients with MEMP and lactic acidosis showed focal hypoperfusion in the temporal region, while the perfusion was normal in the COX deficient patient and in 2 Leigh’s disease (subacute necrotizing encephalopathy) patients. In the remaining 1 Leigh’s patient frontotemporal hypoperfusion was found. In all patients there were non specific structural abnormalities detected by MRI - cortical and subcortical atrophy, and scattered demyelination foci. In the case of ceroid lipofuscinosis the MRI showed cerebral atrophy and cerebellar hypoplasia, and the SPECT showed right frontal and occipital hypoperfusion, bilateral parietal physiological riping process. The patient with tuberous sclerosis showed bilateral temporo-occipital hypoperfusion. Conclusion - 1. SPECT images demonstrated hypoperfusion rCBF changes in 14 out of all 16 patients. 2. Regional cerebral/cerebellar hypoperfusion was detected by SPECT in mitochondrial encephalomyopathies, with lactate acidosis and aminoacidopathies giving high informative value about the cerebral perfusion.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Meetings of the administrative board of the Hungarian Epilepsy League]

SZUPERA Zoltán

Clinical Neuroscience

[Severe intracranial hypotension in an adolescent with Marfan syndrome. Case report]

ROSDY Beáta, KOLLÁR Katalin, MÓSER Judit, VÁRALLYAY György, KORDÁS Mariann

[Spontaneous intracranial hypotension is a rare complication of connective tissue disorders. One of them is Marfan syndrome. It predisposes the patient to meningeal diverticula. Possibly after minor unrecognised head trauma or secondary to Valsalva manoeuvre cerebrospinal fluid leak from meningeal diverticula can happen. It causes postural headache. We describe a 15 year old adolescent female newly diagnosed with Marfan syndrome, who presented with intractable postural headache. Our patient's brain MRI showed bilateral frontal subdural effusion, narrow ventricles, downward displacement of the brainstem, enlarged cervical venous plexi, dural ectasias and wide nerve root sleeves. Radionuclide cisternography demonstrated CSF leaks at multiple sites. She could not be treated conservatively, but was successfully treated by epidural saline injections. Control brain and cervical MRI confirmed her healing, too. At the two and half year follow up visit, she was completely well. So we recommend this easiest technic to use before epidural autolog blood patches.]

All articles in the issue

Related contents

Hungarian Radiology

[High resolution sonography for the examination of peripheral nerves]

JOSEF Böhm

[High-frequency sonography is an important method for the imaging of the peripheral nerves, even though it is rarely used. For the examination of superficially located nerves, currently available transducers with frequencies between 12-17 MHz offer a better axial resolution than even MRI. Sonography is superior to MRI especially for the examination of nerves of the upper extremity. Main indications for the sonography of the nerves are entrapment syndromes, traumatic injuries of the nerves, tumors, polyneuropathies and sonographically-guided interventions. The sensitivity of sonography and electrophysiology in the diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome and cubital tunnel syndrome are comparable. The combination of ultrasonography with electrophysiological studies increases the diagnostic yield in carpal and cubital tunnel syndromes. Sonography provides information for planning of peripheral nerve surgery and is helpful in evaluating postoperative complications. In selected cases, sonography can detect nerve lesions that require operative therapy earlier than electrophysiology. With technical enhancements, highfrequency ultrasonography is gaining increasing importance in the routine diagnostics of peripheral nerves lesions.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Regulation of water transport in brain oedema]

DÓCZI Tamás, SCHWARCZ Attila, GALLYAS Ferenc, BOGNER Péter, PÁL József, SULYOK Endre, GÖMÖRI Éva, VAJDA Zsolt

[The study gives an overview on the regulation of cerebral water content and of brain volume. The molecular mechanisms of the development and resolution of various oedema forms are discussed in detail. The physiological and pathophysiological role of the recently discovered molecular water channel proteins aquaporin-1 (AQP1) and aquaporin-4 (AQP4) as well as the importance of central neuroendocrine regulation by vasopressin and atriopeptin are reviewed based on the relevant literature and personal studies. Quantitative water maps based on the combination of multicompartment- T2, diffusion weighted MRI and T1 studies have proven to be powerful tools for studying new drugs against brain oedema brought about by various neuropathological conditions and for testing their efficacy both in animal experimental and clinical conditions. Non-peptide vasopressin antagonists, atriopeptin agonists and drugs targeting AQP4 are potential new families of oedema-decreasing drugs.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[MANAGEMENT AFTER DBS IMPLANTATION]

KOVÁCS Norbert, BALÁS István, JANSZKY József, ASCHERMANN Zsuzsanna, NAGY Ferenc, DÓCZI Tamás, KOMOLY Sámuel

[Deep brain stimulation is a widely used technique for the treatment of movement disorders. This method is a breakthrough in treatment of drug-resistant idiopathic Parkinson’s disease, essential tremor and dystonia. The aim of the present paper is to give an inside overview of the postoperative management like fine tuning of the stimulation and balancing the antiparkinsonian medication. We also discuss the advantage of the use of the (Access Therapy) patient controller. After reviewing the stimulation-related side-effects and their management, the contraindicated medical procedures are discussed.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Magnetic resonance imaging in the course of alemtuzumab and teriflunomide therapy]

MIKE Andrea, KINCSES Zsigmond Tamás, VÉCSEI László

[Our work aimed to review the published results of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) obtained in the course of alemtuzumab and teriflunomide therapy in multiplex sclerosis. In multiplex sclerosis MRI sensitively detects subclinical pathological processes, which do not manifest clinically in the early course of the disease, however have substantial significance from the viewpoint of the long-term disease prognosis. MRI has an increasingly important role in the early monitoring of the therapeutic efficacy. In the last 15 years several clinical trials have been conducted with alemtuzumab and teriflunomide in multiple sclerosis providing evidence about the favourable clinical effect of these drugs. MRI images were acquired in these trials as well, and the results published recently in the scientific literature. These MRI results denote the suppression of the disease activity and the neurodegenerative processes, which may imply a favourable effect on the long-term prognosis of the disease. ]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Severe intracranial hypotension in an adolescent with Marfan syndrome. Case report]

ROSDY Beáta, KOLLÁR Katalin, MÓSER Judit, VÁRALLYAY György, KORDÁS Mariann

[Spontaneous intracranial hypotension is a rare complication of connective tissue disorders. One of them is Marfan syndrome. It predisposes the patient to meningeal diverticula. Possibly after minor unrecognised head trauma or secondary to Valsalva manoeuvre cerebrospinal fluid leak from meningeal diverticula can happen. It causes postural headache. We describe a 15 year old adolescent female newly diagnosed with Marfan syndrome, who presented with intractable postural headache. Our patient's brain MRI showed bilateral frontal subdural effusion, narrow ventricles, downward displacement of the brainstem, enlarged cervical venous plexi, dural ectasias and wide nerve root sleeves. Radionuclide cisternography demonstrated CSF leaks at multiple sites. She could not be treated conservatively, but was successfully treated by epidural saline injections. Control brain and cervical MRI confirmed her healing, too. At the two and half year follow up visit, she was completely well. So we recommend this easiest technic to use before epidural autolog blood patches.]