Clinical Neuroscience

Pathology of the vestibular system

GOSZTONYI György1, ZILL Edith1

JULY 20, 1993

Clinical Neuroscience - 1993;46(07-08)

The vestibular end organ, in spite of its small size, has extremely rich interconnections with other parts of the nervous system. The vestibular system can be damaged at the end organ, along the vestibular nerve, in its brain stem representations and in its cerebellar projections. The nature of the pathological process damaging the vestibular system is manifold: neoplastic, inflammatory, vascular, nutritional and degenerative. Neural complications of AIDS may also involve the vestibular system. The lesions may be focal, multifocal and diffuse. While in the past the results of neurootological examinations could only be correlated with post mortem findings, NMI opens new horizons for neurootological and topoanatomical correlative studies.

AFFILIATIONS

  1. Institute of Neuropathology, Freie Universität Berlin

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