Clinical Neuroscience

[Occlusive hydrocephalus caused by a fourth ventricle arachnoid cyst (in English language)]

SZŰCS Anna, VÁRADY Péter, PESTALITY Péter, FABÓ Dániel, LALIT Narula, KENÉZ József

JANUARY 22, 2008

Clinical Neuroscience - 2008;61(01-02)

[The case history of a woman with occlusive hydrocephalus caused by a fourth ventricle cyst is presented. She had slowly progressive complaints and symptoms - concentration and memory disturbances, low-tempered mood, then slight dizziness, loss of appetite and progressive headache - transitorily misinterpreted for signs of depression. She had been treated by psychotherapy and antidepressants for months. Since she did not improve she was referred to a psychiatric hospital. The rapidly progressing neurological syndrome with worsening headache, gait disturbance and vomiting was finally identified and it turned out to be caused by a fourth ventricle CSF blockage of unknown aetiology. An acute neurosurgical intervention was indicated. It revealed a huge fourth ventricle cyst, undetectable on MRI, occupying the whole ventricle. The resection of its walls resulted in complete recovery. We conclude that since unspecific mental complaints and symptoms suggesting depression may be misleading, their organic origin has to be excluded.]

COMMENTS

0 comments

Further articles in this publication

Clinical Neuroscience

[Péter Rajna : Aging brain - aging mind - ageless (?) soul]

KOPP Mária

Clinical Neuroscience

[COMBINED USE OF PATTERN ELECTRORETINOGRAPHY AND PATTERN VISUAL EVOKED POTENTIALS IN THE NEUROOPHTHALMOLOGICAL DIAGNOSIS]

BENEDEK Krisztina, PÁLFFY Andrea, BENCSIK Krisztina, FEJES Imre, RAJDA Cecília, TUBOLY Gábor, LISZLI Péter

[Objective - To survey the role of pattern electroretinography (PERG) and pattern visual evoked potentials (VEPs) in the process of clinical evaluation of neuro-ophthalmological cases. The study is illustrated with the electrophysiological findings of 231 patients sent to our laboratory in 2005 because of the suspicion of damage in the optic pathway. Methods - The RETIport program of the ROLAND equipment (Wiesbaden - Germany) was used to record PERGs and VEPs. The recordings were done according to the recommendations of the International Society for Clinical Electrophysiology of Vision. Results - The combined application of PERG and VEP provided useful data on the retino-cortical conduction time and hence demyelinisation. The comparison of the N35/P50 and P50/N90 amplitudes of the PERG recordings greatly promoted the diagnostic procedure. Conclusions - The combined application of PERG and VEP methods is recommended in the assessment of optic nerve function of neuro-ophthalmological patients.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[THE USE OF STALEVO IN HUNGARY. AN OBSERVATIONAL STUDY]

KLIVÉNYI Péter, VÉCSEI László

[The triple combination of levodopa, DDCI and entacapone (Stalevo) is used to treat motor complication in Parkinsonian patients with fluctuation. An observational investigation has been conducted in Hungary to study the effects of Stalevo on the “wearing off” phenomenon and on the quality of life in patients, who are to be treated with. The introduction of Stalevo to the treatment resulted in no changes in the number of patients taking selegiline, amantadine and dopamin agonists, while the number of patients taking anticholinergic drugs were slightly increased. This treatment significantly decreased the average Hoehn-Yahr stadium, as well as the non-motor symptoms, without any remarkable side effect. Stalevo also improved the quality of life, detected by the EQ-5D questionare and the visual analoge scale.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[MANAGEMENT AFTER DBS IMPLANTATION]

KOVÁCS Norbert, BALÁS István, JANSZKY József, ASCHERMANN Zsuzsanna, NAGY Ferenc, DÓCZI Tamás, KOMOLY Sámuel

[Deep brain stimulation is a widely used technique for the treatment of movement disorders. This method is a breakthrough in treatment of drug-resistant idiopathic Parkinson’s disease, essential tremor and dystonia. The aim of the present paper is to give an inside overview of the postoperative management like fine tuning of the stimulation and balancing the antiparkinsonian medication. We also discuss the advantage of the use of the (Access Therapy) patient controller. After reviewing the stimulation-related side-effects and their management, the contraindicated medical procedures are discussed.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Academic Emil Pásztor is 80 years old]

VÉCSEI László

All articles in the issue

Related contents

Clinical Neuroscience

Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease: A single center experience and systemic analysis of cases in Turkey

USLU Ilgen Ferda, ELIF Gökçal, GÜRSOY Esra Azize, KOLUKISA Mehmet, YILDIZ Babacan Gulsen

We aimed to analyze the clinical, laboratory and neuroimaging findings in patients with sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) in a single center as well as to review other published cases in Turkey. Between January 1st, 2014 and June 31st, 2017, all CJD cases were evaluated based on clinical findings, differential diagnosis, the previous misdiagnosis, electroencephalography (EEG), cerebrospinal fluid and cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in our center. All published cases in Turkey between 2005-2018 were also reviewed. In a total of 13 patients, progressive cognitive decline was the most common presenting symptom. Two patients had a diagnosis of Heidenhain variant, 1 patient had a diagnosis of Oppenheimer-Brownell variant. Seven patients (53.3%) had been misdiagnosed with depression, vascular dementia, normal pressure hydrocephalus or encephalitis. Eleven patients (87%) had typical MRI findings but only 5 of these were present at baseline. Asymmetrical high signal abnormalities on MRI were observed in 4 patients. Five patients (45.4%) had periodic spike wave complexes on EEG, all appeared during the follow-up. There were 74 published cases in Turkey bet­ween 2005 and 2018, with various clinical presentations. CJD has a variety of clinical features in our patient series as well as in cases reported in Turkey. Although progressive cognitive decline is the most common presenting symptom, unusual manifestations in early stages of the disease might cause misdiagnosis. Variant forms should be kept in mind in patients with isolated visual or cerebellar symptoms. MRI and EEG should be repeated during follow-up period if the clinical suspicion still exists.

Clinical Neuroscience

Autonomic nervous system may be affected after carpal tunnel syndrome surgery: A possible mechanism for persistence of symptoms after surgery

ONDER Burcu, KELES Yavuz Betul

After carpal tunnel surgery, some patients report complaints such as edema, pain, and numbness. Purpose – The aim of this study was to evaluate autonomic nervous system function in patients with a history of carpal tunnel surgery using sympathetic skin response (SSR). Thirty three patients (55 ±10 years old) with a history of unilateral operation for carpal tunnel syndrome were included in the study. The SSR test was performed for both hands. Both upper extremities median and ulnar nerve conduction results were recorded. A reduced amplitude (p=0.006) and delayed latency (p<0.0001) were detected in the SSR test on the operated side compared to contralateral side. There was no correlation between SSR and carpal tunnel syndrome severity. Although complex regional pain syndrome does not develop in patients after carpal tunnel surgery, some of the complaints may be caused by effects on the autonomic nervous system.

Clinical Neuroscience

Simultaneous subdural, subarachnoideal and intracerebral hAemorrhage after rupture of a peripheral middle cerebral artery aneurysm

BÉRES-MOLNÁR Anna Katalin, FOLYOVICH András, SZLOBODA Péter, SZENDREY-KISS Zsolt, BERECZKI Dániel, BAKOS Mária, VÁRALLYAY György, SZABÓ Huba, NYÁRI István

The cause of intracerebral, subarachnoid and subdural haemorrhage is different, and the simultaneous appearance in the same case is extremely rare. We describe the case of a patient with a ruptured aneurysm on the distal segment of the middle cerebral artery, with a concomitant subdural and intracerebral haemorrhage, and a subsequent secondary brainstem (Duret) haemorrhage. The 59-year-old woman had hypertension and diabetes in her medical history. She experienced anomic aphasia and left-sided headache starting one day before admission. She had no trauma. A few minutes after admission she suddenly became comatose, her breathing became superficial. Non-contrast CT revealed left sided fronto-parietal subdural and subarachnoid and intracerebral haemorrhage, and bleeding was also observed in the right pontine region. The patient had leucocytosis and hyperglycemia but normal hemostasis. After the subdural haemorrhage had been evacuated, the patient was transferred to intensive care unit. Sepsis developed. Echocardiography did not detect endocarditis. Neurological status, vigilance gradually improved. The rehabilitation process was interrupted by epileptic status. Control CT and CT angiography proved an aneurysm in the peripheral part of the left middle cerebral artery, which was later clipped. Histolo­gical examination excluded mycotic etiology of the aneu­rysm and “normal aneurysm wall” was described. The brain stem haemorrhage – Duret bleeding – was presumably caused by a sudden increase in intracranial pressure due to the supratentorial space occupying process and consequential trans-tentorial herniation. This case is a rarity, as the patient not only survived, but lives an active life with some residual symptoms.

Clinical Neuroscience

[UNCOMMON MANIFESTATION OF CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM SARCOIDOSIS]

RÓZSA Anikó, SZTANKANINECZ Yvette, GÁCS Gyula, MAGYAR Tamás

[Two cases of uncommon manifestation of central nervous system sarcoidosis are reported. A 42 year-old man had a spinal cord sarcoidosis. MRI of the spinal cord showed myelopathy in the cervico-thoracic region, and the T2-weighted image showed increasing signal intensity. Neurological symptoms did not correllate with radiological abnormalities. Neurological manifestation was paucisymptomatic. Half a year later steroid and azatioprin therapy led to almost complet radiological and clinical regression. In the second case we present a 49 year-old woman who had left side internuclear ophthalmoplegia and the brainstem lesion. The patient was proven to have sarcoidosis. In this case no abnormalities were found in brain MRI. Neurological symptoms could not be detected by MRI, probably caused by brainstem parenchymal lesions consisting of microgranulomatosis that is sarcoid "brainstem encephalitis". Neurological symptoms improved after steroid treatment in this case too. In both of the cases pulmonary lymphadenopathy helped to diagnose sarcoidosis. In our cases there were interesting correllations between neurological symptoms and MRI abnormalities. At the spinal cord sarcoidosis the radiological abnormalities were more striking than the clinical manifestation. In the other case we found distinct brainstem symptoms but could not detect MRI abnormalities.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Diagnosis of epilepsy]

JANSZKY József

[0.5-1% of the population suffers from epilepsy, while another 5% undergoes diagnostic evaluations due to the possibility of epilepsy. In the case of suspected epileptic seizures we face the following questions: Is it an epileptic seizure? The main and most frequent differential- diagnostic problems are the psychogenic non-epileptic seizures ("pseudo-seizures") and the convulsive syncope, which is often caused by heart disorders. Is it epilepsy? After an unprovoked seizure, the information on recurrence risk is an important question. The reoccurrence is more possible if a known etiological factor is present or the EEG shows epileptiform discharges. After an isolated epileptic seizure, the EEG is specific to epilepsy in 30-50% of cases. The EEG should take place within 24 hours postictally. If the EEG shows no epileptiform potentials, a sleep-EEG is required. What is the cause of seizures? Hippocampal sclerosis, benign tumors, and malformations of the cortical development are the most frequent causes of the focal epilepsy. Three potentially life-threatening conditions may cause chronic epilepsy: vascular malformations, tumors, and neuroinfections. The diagnosis in theses cases can usually be achieved by MRI, therefore, MRI is obligatory in all epilepsies starting in adulthood. The presence of epileptogenic lesion has a prognostic significance in treatment. If the MRI shows a circumscribed lesion then the pharmacological treatment will likely to be unsuccessful, while surgery may result in seizure freedom. The new and quantitative MRI techniques, such as volumetry, T2-relaxometry, MR-spectroscopy, and functional MRI play a growing role in the epilepsy diagnosis.]