Clinical Neuroscience

[Occlusive hydrocephalus caused by a fourth ventricle arachnoid cyst (in English language)]

SZŰCS Anna, VÁRADY Péter, PESTALITY Péter, FABÓ Dániel, LALIT Narula, KENÉZ József

JANUARY 22, 2008

Clinical Neuroscience - 2008;61(01-02)

[The case history of a woman with occlusive hydrocephalus caused by a fourth ventricle cyst is presented. She had slowly progressive complaints and symptoms - concentration and memory disturbances, low-tempered mood, then slight dizziness, loss of appetite and progressive headache - transitorily misinterpreted for signs of depression. She had been treated by psychotherapy and antidepressants for months. Since she did not improve she was referred to a psychiatric hospital. The rapidly progressing neurological syndrome with worsening headache, gait disturbance and vomiting was finally identified and it turned out to be caused by a fourth ventricle CSF blockage of unknown aetiology. An acute neurosurgical intervention was indicated. It revealed a huge fourth ventricle cyst, undetectable on MRI, occupying the whole ventricle. The resection of its walls resulted in complete recovery. We conclude that since unspecific mental complaints and symptoms suggesting depression may be misleading, their organic origin has to be excluded.]

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[Academic Emil Pásztor is 80 years old]

VÉCSEI László

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[Functional magnetic resonance imaging in neurology (in English language)]

AUER Tibor, SCHWARCZ Attila, HORVÁTH Réka A., BARSI Péter, JANSZKY József

[The present contribution discusses the clinical use of functional MRI (fMRI) and its role in the most common neurological diseases. FMRI was found a reliable and reproducible examination tool resulting in a wide distribution of fMRI methods in presurgical evaluation of epilepsy in determining the relationship of eloquent areas and the epileptic focus. Preliminary data suggest that fMRI using memory paradigms can predict the postoperative memory decline in epilepsy surgery by determining whether a reorganization of memory functions took place. Speech-activated fMRI became the most used tool in determining hemispheric dominance. Visual and senso-motor cortex can also be routinely investigated by fMRI which helps in decision on epilepsy surgery. FMRI combined with EEG is a new diagnostic tool in epilepsy and sleep disorders. FMRI can identify the penumbra after stroke and can provide an additional information on metabolic state of the threatened brain tissue. FMRI has a predictive role in poststroke recovery. In relapsing-remitting MS an adaptive reorganization can be demonstrated by fMRI affecting the visual, motor, and memory systems, despite preserved functional performance. Much more extensive reorganization can be demonstrated in secondary progressive MS. These findings suggest that the different stages of MS are related to different stages of the reorganization and MS becomes progressive when there is no more reserve capacity in the brain for reorganization. FMRI offers the capability of detecting early functional hemodynamic alterations in Alzheimer’s disease before morphological changes. FMRI can be a valuable tool to test and monitor treatment efficacy in AD. FMRI can also provide information about the mechanisms of different therapeutic approaches in Parkinson disorder including drug treatment and deep brain stimulation.]

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[Complex regional pain syndrome]

EMBEY-ISZTIN Dezső

[Complex regional pain syndrome is one of the frequently topics to be discussed during International Congresses. Three books have been published recently by the IASP Press (1994., 2001., 2005.) The aim of my publications is to draw the attention to this syndrome frequently unrecognized, and to summarize an interesting case report.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[FREQUENCY OF DIFFERENT FORMS OF DEMENTIA IN THE DEPARTMENT OF NEUROPATHOLOGY OF THE HUNGARIAN NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF PSYCHIATRY AND NEUROLOGY DURING A 3-YEAR PERIOD]

KOVÁCS Gábor Géza, KŐVÁRI Viktor, NAGY Zoltán

[Background - Dementia is an increasing problem of the society. The underlying cause of dementia may be difficult to diagnose during life. Only neuropathological examination gives definite diagnosis. Differences in the reported frequency may be related to factors such as the age or gender of subjects with dementia. Materials and methods - In our neuropathology-based study we examined 156 consecutive subjects clinically diagnosed with dementia during a 3-year period. Using histopathological criteria we calculated the frequencies of various disorders causing dementia. We studied the effect of age and gender on these frequencies. Results - Alzheimer’s disease was the most frequent pathologic finding (57.7%) followed by vascular dementia (43%); diffuse Lewy body disease (15.4%); argyrophilic grain dementia (12.1%), various forms of frontotemporal dementia (5.7%); and other (4.5%). The latter comprise prion disease, alcoholic encephalopathy, and hippocampal sclerosis. Mixed pathology was common: concomitant Alzheimer’s disease was present in 41.6% of diffuse Lewy body disease cases and in 49.2% of vascular dementia patients. Pure disease forms are rare: Alzheimer’s disease: 26.3%, vascular dementia: 17.3%, diffuse Lewy body disease: 5.1%, argyrophilic grain dementia: 2.5%. Females were overrepresented among those with Alzheimer’s disease with age at death above 75 years (p <0.02), while males were overrepresented in patients below 75 years with vascular dementia (p <0.05). Conclusions - Our study indicates that the frequency of neurodegenerative dementias is high in the examined patients, but vascular pathology frequently influences the clinical course.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[THE LANDMARKS OF THE MEASUREMENT OF CEREBRAL BLOOD FLOW]

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[History of the measurement of local cerebral blood flow may cover a period of one and a half centuries. Parallel forthcoming of both theoretical and technical development were the key elements of ensuing progress resulting in the present state, when by the aid of in vivo blood flow and metabolic maps, we can visualize locales of brain functioning and their interconnections. Two theoretical landmarks should be mentioned in this historic process. First, the work of Adolf Fick, as the starter of quantitative measurements in this field, and Seymour Kety’s model of a single, homogenously perfused tissue element. The solution of this model, in the form of Kety’s equation is still fundamental to present day blood flow mapping techniques. Among the numerous investigators over the past years, two Hungarian scientist can be named as major contributors. Kálmán Sántha made substantial studies with continuous registration of local cerebral blood flow by the aid of thermocouples, while Emil Pásztor invented the hydrogen clearance method for the measurement of local cerebral blod flow both in human and in animal studies.]

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Clinical Neuroscience

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Clinical Neuroscience

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