Clinical Neuroscience

Marchiafava-Bignami disease: Report of three cases

GUNAY Gul, MESUDE Özerden, ZEYNEP Ozdemir, CAHIT Keskinkiliç, HAKAN Selçuk, BATUHAN Kara, AYSUN Soysal

JANUARY 30, 2020

Clinical Neuroscience - 2020;73(01-02)

DOI: https://doi.org/10.18071/isz.73.0065

Marchiafava-Bignami disease (MBD) is a rare alcohol-associated disorder characterized by demyelination and necrosis of the corpus callosum. We report three patients who had history of chronic alcoholism, different clinical presentation and MRI findings consistent with the diagnosis of Marchiafava-Bignami disease.

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Myasthenia gravis, Guillain-Barré syndrome, or both?

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