Clinical Neuroscience

[Is there a relationship between CT morphology and the MMS scale achievements in patients with dementia?]

PÉK Márta1, BARSI Péter2, NAGY Zoltán1

MARCH 20, 1994

Clinical Neuroscience - 1994;47(03-04)

[An attempt is made to establish relationships between CT parameters and the achievements on the Mini Mental State (MMS) scale of patients suffering from various types of dementia. The results suggest that the Mini Mental State scores change together in Alzheimer's type of dementias, referring to the global deterioration of functions in contrast to the vascular type of dementias, where the scores on each item change independently of each other. In the combined examination of the two groups the parietal lobe and the volume of the ventricles showed mainly connection with the neuropsychological functions. ]

AFFILIATIONS

  1. Semmelweis OTE Pszichiátriai és Pszichoterápiás Klinika, Budapest
  2. Országos Pszichiátriai és Neurológiai Intézet, Budapest

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