Clinical Neuroscience

[Inclusion body myositis - a rarely recognized disorder]

DÉZSI Lívia, DANIELSSON Olof, GÁTI István, VARGA Edina, VÉCSEI László

MARCH 30, 2013

Clinical Neuroscience - 2013;66(03-04)

[Inclusion body myositis is the most common disabling inflammatory myopathy in the elderly. It is more frequent in men and after the age of 50 years. Inflammatory and degenerative features coexist. There is a T-cell mediated autoimmunity driven by in situ clonally expanded cytotoxic CD8-positive T-cells invading non-necrotic muscle fibres expressing MHC-I antigen. The hallmarks of degeneration are the deposition of protein aggregates and the formation of vesicles. The course of the disease is slow and the diagnosis is usually set after several years. The muscle weakness and wasting is assymetric, affecting predominantly distal muscles of the upper extremity and proximal muscles of the legs. The signs and clinical course can be characteristic, but the diagnosis is established by muscle biopsy. There is currently no evidence based effective treatment for sIBM. Prednisone, azathioprine, methotrexate, cyclosporine and IFN-β failed. Oxandrolon did not improve symptoms. Treatment with intravenous immunglobuline (IVIG) induced in some patients a transient improvement of swallowing and of muscle strenght, but the overall study results were negative. A T-cell depleting monoclonal antibody (alemtuzumab), in a small uncontrolled study slowed down disease progression for a six-month period. Repeated muscle biopsies showed the reduction of T-cells in the muscle and the suppression of some degeneration associated molecules. An effective therapeutic mean should act on both aspects of the pathomechanism, on the inflammatory and the degenerative processes as well.]

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[Effects of spinal cord stimulation on heart rate variability in patients with chronic pain]

KALMÁR Zsuzsanna, KOVÁCS Norbert, BALÁS István, PERLAKI Gábor, PLÓZER Enikõ, ORSI Gergely, ALTBACKER Anna, SCHWARCZ Attila, HEJJEL László, KOMOLY Sámuel, JANSZKY József

[Background - Spinal cord stimulation has become an established clinical option for treatment of refractory chronic pain and angina pectoris, but its precise mechanism of action is unclear. We investigated the effect of spinal cord stimulation (SCS) on heart rate variability (HRV) and evaluating its influence on the sympathetic/parasympathetic balance in chronic pain. Materials and purpose - Seven patients (three men, four women) with SCS due to chronic pain were included. The SCS was programmed in three different ways: (i) to stimulate at an amplitude known to generate paresthesias (ON-state), (ii) at a subliminal level (SUB state), or (iii) switched off (OFFstate). HRV analysis was based on 5-min segments of the consecutive normal RR intervals and was performed with custom software (Kubios HRV Analysis). Results - The mean heart rate was higher in ON state compared to SUB state (p=0.018) and the high-frequency component of the HRV was lower in ON compared to OFF period (p=0.043). Other HRV parameters values did not significantly differ during the three tested periods. Conclusion - Spinal cord stimulation in chronic pain seems to be accompanied by reduced parasympathetic tone, unlike SCS in angina pectoris where previous studies found a reduced cardiac sympathetic tone. Our study might lead to understand the mechanism of action of SCS We investigated a relatively small number of patients, which is the main limitation of our study. Thus, further studies with larger number of patients are required for validation of our results.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Efficacy of deep brain stimulation in our patients with Parkinson’s disease]

GERTRÚD Tamás, TAKÁTS Annamária, RADICS Péter, RÓZSA Ildikó, CSIBRI Éva, RUDAS Gábor, GOLOPENCZA Péter, ENTZ László, FABÓ Dániel, ERÕSS Loránd

[Background and purposes - In advanced Parkinson’s disease, medically refractory motor fluctuation or medically resistant tremor considerably affects quality of life. However, these symptoms can be mostly successfully treated by deep brain stimulation. We analyzed the efficacy of bilateral subthalamic stimulation in our patients with Parkinson’s disease. Methods - We assessed the clinical data of ten patients who have been treated in the Department of Neurology, Semmelweis University and have been operated in the National Institute of Neurosciences between 2008 and 2011. The Hoehn-Yahr scale score, the Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale score and the Parkinson’s Disease Questionnaire 39, as well as the dose of antiparkinson medication were documented prior to and one year after surgery. Results - Patient condition improved according to the Hoehn-Yahr scale, approximately by two stages. The dose of antiparkinson medication could be reduced by 63.4% (p=0.005) post operation. Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale scores decreased by 70.9% (p=0.005). 12 hours after medication withdrawal, execution of daily activity improved by 57.1% (p<0.01) and motor functions developed by 79.1% (p<0.01). Duration of dyskinesias decreased by 62.5% (p=0.018), duration of akinesia diminished by 87.5% (p=0.005). Quality of life rose by 41.6% (p<0.01). Neuropsychological tests detected improvement in verbal memory. Conclusion - With deep brain stimulation, the dosage of antiparkinson medication could be significantly reduced, with considerable improvements in motor function and quality of life. Although the number of patients is still low, good results have been established by careful patient selection, precise neurosurgical procedure and by appropriate programming and patient care.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Editorial message]

BANCZEROWSKI Péter

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[We spend four fifths of our sleep time in nonREM (NREM) sleep. The rather strange designation of this sleep state was a consequence of the fascination by rapid-eye-movement sleep (REM sleep) after its discovery in the middle of the last century.]

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