Clinical Neuroscience

Anesthesia for medulla oblongata surgery

KORENCHY Mária1, MOLNÁR Mária1, KOVÁCS Klára1, FUTÓ Judit1

MAY 20, 1994

Clinical Neuroscience - 1994;47(05-06)

Hazards to patients undergoing brainstem operati­ons include venous air embolisation, hypoten­sion, vital sign changes and specific cranial nerve injury. Except for vital sign changes, these hazards are widely discussed in various handbooks and ar­ticles. Vital sign changes may result either from massive venous air embolism or bramstem compres­sion caused by surgical manipulation. If the opera­ted area is very close to the vasomotor center, even the most careful manipulation can cause extreme bradycardia with hypotension. These perilous chan­ges frequently keep the surgeon from continuing the operation. Transitional pacemaker therapy can be used du­ring these types of operations to prevent critical cardiac arrests.

AFFILIATIONS

  1. National Institute of Neurosurgery, Budapest, Hungary

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