Ca&Bone

[The increase of fracture risk in type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus]

HULLÓ DANIELLA1

FEBRUARY 14, 2007

Ca&Bone - 2007;10(01)

[Studies in the last couple of years found more and more convincing evidence about the fact that impaired glucose metabolism leads to structural changes in the skeletal system leading toward osteoporosis. While patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus have decreased bone density, measurement showed increased bone mineral density in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Despite these differences, risk of vertebral and nonvertebral fractures is increased in both groups of diabetic patients. Decreased pancreatic beta cell function is accompanied by several hormonal disturbances leading to decreased bone formation even in the early stage of diabetes. Peak bone mass of diabetic children is lower than found in nondiabetic children. Late complications of diabetes, vascular and neuronal impairments, impaired renal function, and secondary hormonal disturbances are added to this process. IGF-1 may have a crucial role in the pathogenesis of osteoporosis in diabetes. The structure of the molecule is similar to insulin. IGF-1 has effect on normal bone formation, inhibits the apoptosis and interferes with several other metabolic pathways. IGF-1 mediates the effect of growth hormone to the muscular and skeletal system. IGF-1 level decreases with age, and lower level of IGF-1 is found in diabetic patients. Long term complications of diabetes can also occur, which may enhance the process of bone resorption. Although the evidence is growing that fracture risk is higher in diabetic patiens, there are still scientists who question the association between the two disorders.]

AFFILIATIONS

  1. Szegedi Tudományegyetem, Szent-Györgyi Albert Orvos- és Gyógyszerésztudományi Centrum, Általános Orvostudományi Kar, Szak- és Továbbképzési Központ, Szeged

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[Higher bone fracture prevalence in postmenopausal pollen allergic women]

FERENCZ VIKTÓRIA, MÉSZÁROS SZILVIA, CSUPOR EMŐKE, TÓTH EDIT, BORS Katalin, FALUS ANDRÁS, HORVÁTH CSABA

[Our aim was to investigate whether pollen allergy can affect bone mass and fractures in postmenopausal women. A total of 125 postmenopausal pollen allergic women (mean age 61.26 years) were split into four groups: treated neither with H1 histamine receptor (H1R) antagonist nor with inhaled corticosteroid (n=43), treated only with H1R antagonist (n=53), treated both with H1R antagonist and inhaled corticosteroid (n=17), treated only with inhaled corticosteroid (n=12) for at least five years, seasonally. One-hundred non-allergic postmenopausal subjects matched for age, body mass index (BMI) and age at menopause served as controls. Overweight and obesity (25 kg/m2 ≤ BMI) were common among allergic women (76%). Allergic patients without treatment had a slightly lower bone density than their non-allergic mates. Untreated allergic had almost triple the rate of prevalent low-energy fractures (distal forearm, hip and clinical vertebral fractures: 34.9%) compared to non-allergic women (13%, χ2 p=0.003). Bone fracture occurred more often in H1R-only treated patients (30.19%) than in controls (χ2 p=0.01), however, clinical vertebral or hip fractures developed neither in those treated only with H1R antagonist nor in those who received both H1R antagonist and inhaled corticosteroid. Bone fractures were more frequent among patients with inhaled steroid treatment than among patients with a combined treatment of inhaled steroid and antihistamine (50% vs. 29.4%). BMI predicted prevalent fractures at 1.278 (95% CI, 1.047 to 1.559, p=0.016) for 1 kg/m2 increase among untreated allergic patients. In conclusion we found a high prevalence of low-energy fractures among pollen-allergic postmenopausal women, which was associated with obesity. It is possible that the H1R antagonists compensate for the negative effect of pollen-allergy and the adverse effect of inhaled corticosteroid treatment on bone fracture risk.]

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[István Holló, MD, professor 1926-2007]

SZŰCS János

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[INTRODUCTION - Osteoporosis is defined as a loss of bone tissue and bone mass that leads to a compromised trength and quality of bones and thus to an increased risk of fractures. In many women, menopausal hormonal changes are associated with an increased bone loss. This population has postmenopausal osteoporosis. The essence of osteporosis treatment is the adequate calcium and vitamin D supplementation, which, if needed, might be combined with drug therapy to inhibit the process of bone loss. METHODS - We assessed the adherence to therapy of Hungarian patients and its effect on the risk of bone fractures, using data recorded by the National Health Insurance Fund Administration between 2004 and 2010 (n=223068, mean age: 69.9 years). We performed a statistical analyses of the available data. Medication possession ratio (MPR) for each treatment and the ratio of patients receiving continuous treatment in the study period (for 12, 18 and 24 months) were estimated. Medication persistence was investigated using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. A multivariate Cox proportional hazard model was used to determine the factors influencing the risk of fracture. RESULTS, CONCLUSION - The results of our study show that medication adherence to treatment is low among Hungarian patients [mean MPR: 57.9%; 95% CI (57.7%- 58.0%) and persistence rate: 32.4%; 95% CI (32.2%-32.6%) in the first year]. These parameters are substantially influenced by the administration route and the frequency of treatments [mean MPR ranged 41.5%- 100% and persistence rates ranged 18.8%- 100% in the first year, differences between subgroups were significant (p<0,05)]. Our compliance as well as persistance studies showed that parenteral administration had more beneficial effects. Confirming our preliminary hypotheses, the improvement of patient compliance significantly reduced fracture risk (good compliance was defined as MPR>80%, which was associated with RR: 0.57, p<0.05 for fracture risk). Further improvement might be achieved by parenteral administration [RR for fracture risk 0.60 compared with non-compliant patients and 0.44 compared with compliant subgroups treated with oral and parenteral medications (p<0.05)].]

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[Sulfonylureas, used as base therapy in type 2 diabetes, specifically block ATP-dependent potassium channels (K+ ATP). While in pancreatic beta cells these channels have an essential role in insulin release, they are also involved in cardiovascular adaptive mechanisms. Ion channels with similar morphology may have different pathophysiological effects in the human body. This raises the question, is it necessary to count with some damage to the cardiovascular protective mechanism when using sulfonylurea to induce insulin secretion. Is this indeed a relevant clinical problem today? The answer may lay in the different organ-specific effects of sulfonylureas.]

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[The role of physiotherapy/therapeutic exercise in the treatment of osteoporotic hip fractures]

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[The authors briefly present the role of the physiotherapist in the treatment of osteoporosis. Primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention of locomotion system problems is analyzed. The authors’ specific focus is the complex physiotherapeutic treatment of osteoporotic hip fractures. They propose a prevention program involving locomotion exercises for the prevention of falls. Analyzing the physiotherapists’ activities, the authors describe the most important aspects of patient education and patient information.]

Ca&Bone

[Higher bone fracture prevalence in postmenopausal pollen allergic women]

FERENCZ VIKTÓRIA, MÉSZÁROS SZILVIA, CSUPOR EMŐKE, TÓTH EDIT, BORS Katalin, FALUS ANDRÁS, HORVÁTH CSABA

[Our aim was to investigate whether pollen allergy can affect bone mass and fractures in postmenopausal women. A total of 125 postmenopausal pollen allergic women (mean age 61.26 years) were split into four groups: treated neither with H1 histamine receptor (H1R) antagonist nor with inhaled corticosteroid (n=43), treated only with H1R antagonist (n=53), treated both with H1R antagonist and inhaled corticosteroid (n=17), treated only with inhaled corticosteroid (n=12) for at least five years, seasonally. One-hundred non-allergic postmenopausal subjects matched for age, body mass index (BMI) and age at menopause served as controls. Overweight and obesity (25 kg/m2 ≤ BMI) were common among allergic women (76%). Allergic patients without treatment had a slightly lower bone density than their non-allergic mates. Untreated allergic had almost triple the rate of prevalent low-energy fractures (distal forearm, hip and clinical vertebral fractures: 34.9%) compared to non-allergic women (13%, χ2 p=0.003). Bone fracture occurred more often in H1R-only treated patients (30.19%) than in controls (χ2 p=0.01), however, clinical vertebral or hip fractures developed neither in those treated only with H1R antagonist nor in those who received both H1R antagonist and inhaled corticosteroid. Bone fractures were more frequent among patients with inhaled steroid treatment than among patients with a combined treatment of inhaled steroid and antihistamine (50% vs. 29.4%). BMI predicted prevalent fractures at 1.278 (95% CI, 1.047 to 1.559, p=0.016) for 1 kg/m2 increase among untreated allergic patients. In conclusion we found a high prevalence of low-energy fractures among pollen-allergic postmenopausal women, which was associated with obesity. It is possible that the H1R antagonists compensate for the negative effect of pollen-allergy and the adverse effect of inhaled corticosteroid treatment on bone fracture risk.]