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Lege Artis Medicinae

OCTOBER 20, 2019

[Thiazide- or thiazide-like diuretics should be used in the treatment of patients with hypertension? Particularities of the situation in Hungary]

VÁLYI Péter

[Diuretics have remained the cornerstone of the antihypertensive treatment since their widespreading in the 1960s. According to the 2018 ESC/ESH Guidelines for the management of arterial hypertension, in the absence of evidence from direct comparator trials and recognizing that many of the approved single-pill combinations are based on hydrochlorothiazide, this drug and thiazide-like indapamide can be considered suitable antihypertensive agents. In the 2018 Hungarian guidelines indapamide is named as the most efficacious diuretic in the treatment of patients with hypertension. The aim of the publication is redefining thiazide- and thiazide-like diuretic use in the treatment of hypertensive patients, with particular attention to presently available hydrochlorothia­zide and indapamide, and their combination drugs in Hungary.]

Hypertension and nephrology

FEBRUARY 24, 2021

[Prevention of polyuria during lithium treatment. Recent research and history]

[Renal toxicity of lithium is a highly important subject which may jeopardize the use of an agent needed by millions suffering from recurrent episodes of bipolar disorder. Lithium induced severe renal damage leading to end stage renal disease can be almost prevented today using lowered plasma lithium levels. But administration of medicines are necessary for the prevention of the lithium induced disturbance in renal concentrating operation and development of nephrogenic diabetes insipidus. Use of thiazides, non-steroid anti-inflammatory compounds (indomethacine) amiloride, high doses of desmopressin and their combinations are our present armamentarium. The present therapy for lithiuminduced nephrogenic diabetes insipidus in man is to counter anti-vasopressin action of lithium. The “future” treatment seems to be (on the basis of recent animal experiments) to enhance the sensitivity of the kidney to vasopressin action by administering pharmacologic blockade of the renal P2Y12 receptor by using clopidrogel or prasugrel.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

NOVEMBER 15, 2019

[Hypertension in the elderly ]

BARNA István

[Elevated isolated systolic pressure is the most common and greatest cardiovascular risk factor with age. The prevalence of hypertension increases with age and ex­ceeds 60% over 70 years. Proper treatment of hypertension in the elderly, even in very old age (> 80 years), increases life expectancy and reduces the risk of cardiovascular events. For patients over 65 years of age, the target blood pressure range is between 130-139 / 70-80 mmHg if the patient tolerates the treatment. In elderly patients with poorer conditions, systolic blood pressure may be <150 mmHg. White-coat hypertension is common, nondipper ratio is increased, autonomic nervous system dysregulation is more common, and orthostatic decrease of blood pressure. The renal function is decreased or already impaired, often resulting in poorer therapeutic cooperation due to impaired cognitive function. The blood pressure lowering effect of targeted lifestyle changes may be the same as medication monotherapy, with the main disadvantage of decreasing adherence over time, for which a proper physician-patient relationship is essential. First-line agents for the treatment of elderly hypertension include angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACE inhibitors), angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs), long-acting calcium channel blockers, and thiazide, thiazide-like diuretics. Beta-blockers should be used in the treatment of elderly hypertension if they have other indications (coronary heart disease, heart failure, arrhythmias). More than 70% of hypertensive patients should use combination therapy to achieve target blood pressure. Take advantage of fixed dose combination to improve compliance to optimize treatment. ]

Lege Artis Medicinae

OCTOBER 21, 2020

[Epidemiology of diabetes mellitus and diabetes-related eye complications in Hungary]

TÓTH Gábor, NÉMETH János

[Diabetes mellitus is a disease of civilization and a leading cause of blindness among people of working age in developed countries. It’s prevalence is estimated to be 9.9% in the adult population in Hungary, based on this, the estimated number of people with diabetes mellitus was 807 000 in 2015 in our country. Almost every fifth people with diabetes mellitus has some form of diabetic retinopathy in Hungary. Among diabetic persons 0.3% is blind and 0.3% has serious visual impairment due to not adequately treated diabetes mellitus. The total prevalence-based diabetes retinopathy-associated economic burden was 43.66 billion HUF in 2018 in our country. The two major cost drivers were anti-VEGF injections and vitrectomies; they covered almost the four-fifths of the total cost among people with diabetes mellitus. We have to emphasize the importance of prevention, healthy nutrition and frequent sport activity in the fight against diabetes mellitus and overweight. With at least annually performed eye examinations in people with diabetes mellitus and timely treatment of diabetic retinopathy, visual impairment and blindness due to complications of diabetes mellitus can be prevented. ]

Hypertension and nephrology

OCTOBER 23, 2019

[Blood pressure management for stroke prevention and in the acute stroke. The new guideline of European Society of Hypertension (ESH, 2018), European Society of Cardiology and Hungarian Society of Hypertension (HSH, 2018)]

JENEI Zoltán

[Hypertension is the leading modifiable risk factor for stroke. Its prevalence amongst stroke patient is about 60-70% and the benefit of blood pressure (BP) lowering therapy on stroke risk reduction is well established. However the optimal BP targets for preventing stroke and reducing stroke consequences have been controversial. The new European (ESC/ESH) and Hungarian (HSH) hypertension guideline published in 2018 highlighted the primary and secondary prevention of stroke and the BP management in the acute stroke care as well. According results from ACCORD, SPRINT, HOPE-3, and other metaanalysis the systolic blood pressure (SBP) lowering < 120 mmHg has not favourable effect, thus in hypertensive patients < 65 years the SBP should be lowered to a BP range of 120-129 mmHg. In older patients ≥ 65 years the SBP should be targeted to a BP range of 130-139 mmHg (IA). In patients with acute intracerebral haemorrhage careful acute BP lowering with iv. therapy, to <180 mmHg should be considered only in case of SBP ≥ 220 mmHg (IIaB). In patients with acute ischaemic stroke who are eligible for iv. thrombolysis, BP should be carefully lowered and maintained to < 180/105 mmHg for at least the first 24 h after thrombolysis (IIaB). If the patient is not eli gible for lysis and BP ≤ 220/110 mmHg, routine BP lowering drug therapy is not recommended inside 48-72 h (IA). In patients with markedly elevated BP > 220/110 mmHg who do not receive fibrinolysis, drug therapy may be considered, based on clinical judgement, to reduce BP by 15% during the first 24 h after the stroke onset (IIbC). After 72 h of acute stroke in case of hypertensive patients < 65 years the SBP should be lowered to a BP range of 120-129 mmHg (IIaB). In older patients ≥ 65 years the SBP should be targeted to a BP range of 130-139 mmHg (IA). If BP < 140/90 mmHg after stroke, the BP lowering should be considered (IIbA). It is recommended to initiate an antihypertensive treatment with combination, preferably single pill combination of renin-angiotensin system blockers plus a calcium channel blocker and/or a thiazide like diuretics (IA). Lowering SBP < 120 mmHg is not recommended due to advers events regardless of age and type of stroke either in primary or secondary stroke prevention.]

Hypertension and nephrology

DECEMBER 12, 2019

[Predictive factors for ischemic heart disease, diabetes mellitus and chronic kidney disease among hypertensive patients based on the data of the Hungarian Hypertension Registry 2011-2013-2015. Part I. Hypertensive population aged 35 to 64 years]

KÉKES Ede, PAKSY András, SZEGEDI János, JÁRAI Zoltán

[The association of hypertension with ischemic heart disease, diabetes and chronic kidney disease is the greatest therapeutic challenge because these associations significantly increase mortality and deteriorate life expectancy. It is important for the clinician to clarify the predictive factors of each association for successful prevention or slowing the progression of diseases. According to the database of the Hungarian Hypertension Registry 2011-2013-2015, 11,137 men and 11,112 women with hypertension and comorbidities (CHD, diabetes, CKD) aged between 35 and 64 were analyzed for the purpose of assessing the predictive value of the traditional risk factors in co-morbidity. We analyzed the predictive weight of each variable with single- and multi-variable stepwise logistic regression, and reported Odds ratio (OR, odds ratio). In patients with hypertension aged 35-64 (male / female), the prevalence of CHD was 41.6% / 35.8%, diabetes 27.1% / 23% and KVB 16.2% / 33.8%, respectively. The chance of developing CHD is highest in hypertensive individuals (male/female) who have diabetes (OR 1.30/1.48), who are obese (OR 1.22/1.21), who smoke (OR 1.50/1.51), and whose blood pressure >140/90 mmHg (OR 1.23/1.29). The dominant predictive factors of type 2 diabetes are obesity (visceral obesity) (OR 1.46/1.49), low HDL cholesterol (OR 1.32/1.35), and high triglyceride levels (OR 1.20/1.42); in women the uric acid level also showed high odds ratio (OR 1.39). There is a significant chance of developing chronic kidney disease in hypertension in both sexes, if abnormal uric acid levels (OR 1.73/1.46) and inadequate treatment of high blood pressure (>140Hgmm SBP) (OR 1.43/1.19) are present. In women, the abnormal triglyceride level) also showed a high odd (OR 1.81).]

Hypertension and nephrology

MAY 10, 2019

[Diabetology in dialysis]

MÁCSAI Emília, HALMAI Richárd, NEMERE Éva, BRASNYÓ Pál, KISS István

[According to epidemiological data, the number of diabetic patients requiring dialysis is increasing. Burnt-out diabetes, new onset diabetes during chronic dialysis treatment and new onset diabetes after transplantation diabetes are new types of diabetes compared to the traditional division forms. It is utmost important to evaluate education ability and acceptance the core values of lifestyle changes. Clear guidelines for oral anti-diabetic and insulin therapy have not yet been developed since this group of patients did not participate in previous major surveys. In order to formulate individualized therapeutic recommendations, it is imperative to perform regular glucose self-monitoring, which is also the cornerstone of solving unexpected situations. Both in hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis, special considerations should be applied to the diabetic patient group, this review focuses on the current understanding of available relevant knowledge and summarizes presumably extrarenal diabetic complications as well.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

MARCH 20, 2019

[How can we reach more effective antihypertensive treatment in diabetic patients with hypertension?]

BENCZÚR Béla, TORZSA Péter

[Hypertension is the leading “silent killer” accounting for 10 million deaths worldwide. It frequently occures together with other metabolic risk factors, including type-2 diabetes mellitus and dyslipidemia augmenting the global cardiovascular risk of patients. Their treatment and reaching target blood pressure means a real challenge for practising physicians. According to the recent hypertension guidelines RAAS-inhibitors are the first choice agents which can be excellently combined with diuretics. RAAS-inhibitor based therapy frequently needs to be completed with Ca-antagonist to which statin should be added in the presence of metabolic risk factors. The benefits of amlodipin/atorvastatin fixed combination are multiple: both agents are capable to inhibit the progression of atherosclerosis and to reach blood pressure and LDL target values. In addition the well-known poor statin-adherence can be improved with fixed combination which can contribute to the reduction of risk of these high-risk subjects. ]

Lege Artis Medicinae

DECEMBER 10, 2018

[Type 2 diabetes: what is the role of a General Practitioner in the treatment of diabetes?]

TORZSA Péter, OLÁH Ilona, HARGITTAY Csenge, KALABAY László

[The 2017 National Guidelines of the Hun­garian Diabetes Association emphasize the individual treatment of diabetic patients and the strong, goal-oriented regulation of carbohydrate metabolism from recogni­tion on. Beside monotherapy, primary dual or triple combination therapy may be applied in the treatment of patients. In primary care it’s the treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes where there is a lot to be done. We hope that the everyday use of the Professional Guidelines will contribute to a more successful diabetic care by General Practitioners (GPs). The holistic care of the GP’s team plays an important role in the primary, secondary and tertiary prevention of Type 2 diabetes, which accounts for more than 90% of all diabetic cases. ]

Lege Artis Medicinae

APRIL 18, 2020

[Interrelations between antidepressants and diabetes]

HARGITTAY Csenge, GONDA Xénia, MÁRKUS Bernadett, VÖRÖS Krisztián, TABÁK Gy. Ádám, KALABAY László, RIHMER Zoltán, TORZSA Péter

[Diabetes and depression are frequent comorbidities. They are a heavy burden by themselves, however, as comorbidities increase additionally the number of diabetes-related complications, morbidity, and mortality. In the background of interrelations, there are both well-known and hypothetical mechanisms. The aim of the present review is to outline these interrelations between antidepressants and diabetes and to discuss the effect of medications on carbohydrate metabolism respectively. Anti­depressant treatment on the one hand may improve mood, cognitive function and medication adherence leading to an improved glucose metabolism, on the other hand through their metabolic side effects, they may worsen carbohydrate metabolism. Concerning metabolic side effects, selec­tive serotonin reuptake inhibitors are the sa­fest, while tricyclic antidepressants and mo­noamine oxidase inhibitors should be administered under close monitoring. Se­rotonin and noradrenaline reuptake inhibitors may deteriorate gly­cae­mic control via increased noradre­nergic activation. Novel antidepressants, how­ever, have a neutral or positive impact on gly­caemic measures. Screening for and temporally adjusted treatment of depres­sion may decrease the risk of comorbidities ge­nerated complications. While caring for diabetic patients with depression, one should consider metabolic side effects of antidepressants and close monitoring of carbohydrate metabolism.]