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Clinical Oncology

DECEMBER 30, 2019

[Chemicals and tumors]

MARCSEK Zoltán

[Tumorigenesis is driven usually by non-lethal genetic alterations such as malfunctioning regulatory systems; mainly by inactivating suppressor genes or activating proto-oncogenes or malfunctioning of apoptatic system or decresed activity of the DNA repair system. Several chemicals induces mutations in the regulatory genes forces the cell for continous divisions increasing the chance of accumulation of further mutations. Chemicals, inducing mutations (mutagens) increase the rate of tumor occurrence, are carcinogens.]

Clinical Neuroscience

NOVEMBER 30, 2020

[New results of neuroscience research – the background of symptomatological and etiological diversity of mental disorders]

OSVÁTH Péter

[Nowadays, the focus of genetic, neurobiological, neuropsychological and psychosocial research is on a more accurate discovery of the etiology of mental illnesses, especially with regard to the role and complex interactions of certain risk factors. It is increasingly challenging to interpret the results of different aspects and methodologies in a coherent theoretical framework, as this can only lead to a more accurate understanding of the complexity and mechanism of the psychiatric disorders. The main aim of this paper to overview recent studies on etiological background of mental disorders and to present the most important aspects of the Research Domain Criteria (RDoC) system. Review of reports from comprehensive studies published in the most important psychiatric journals over the past five years summarizing new findings on the etio­logy of mental disorders. Although current classifications indicate that mental disorders are strictly distinct diagnostic categories, new findings suggest that these marked differences in symptomatic, genetic, and neurobiological backgrounds are not detectable, as many mental disorders have been identified as having common molecular genetic risk factors, which may indicate common neurobiological pathomechanisms. Research results support the need for a rethinking of psychiatric nosology on an etiological basis and represent an important step forward in the more accurate exploration of the neurobiological background factors of mental disorders and thus in the development of more targeted therapeutic approaches. The development of the RDoC system can be a great help in this, as this dimensional approach offers the possibility of integrating the - often diffuse or even contradictory - neuroscientific research findings into a unified theoretical framework for the etiology, nosology and treatment of mental disorders. ]

Journal of Nursing Theory and Practice

DECEMBER 30, 2019

[Nutritional changes in the elderly]

NAGY-LŐRINCZ Zsuzsanna, ZÁMBÓ Leonóra, MARGARITOVITS Tijana, VARGA-NAGY Veronika, VARGA Anita, ZENTAI Andrea

[Since population ageing is one of the greatest problem of our time, we should aim not only to increase life expectancy but also healthy life years. Ageing is considered to be a normal biological process that can be characterized by the decline of body functions contributing to the age-related changes in nutrition as well. Although the process is not necessarily accompanied by pathological conditions (such as malnutrition, dehydration, obstipation, cognitive deterioration, fragility, polypharmacy), the evolving physiological changes undoubtedly increase the susceptibility to diseases and accidents. Elderly care should be adapted to the evolving changes, and should meet the person’s specific needs. ]

Lege Artis Medicinae

JULY 01, 2020

[Sarcopenia – muscle loss – pathomechanism, clinical presentation and metabolic comorbidities]

VERECKEI Edit, HODINKA László

[Sarcopenia, or the age-related involution of muscle strength and muscle mass, is a serious public health concern, due to the growing number of elderly population caused by nowadays demographic changes i.e. prolonged life expectancy. By ageing, the muscle tissue is shrinking gradually, leading to the loss of muscle strength and masses. This condition is called sarcopenia. Sar­co­penia is the simultaneous decrease of muscle mass, muscle strength and functional independence. In parallel the physical performance deteriorates (weakness, slowness and poor physical balancing). Fatigue, el­derly behaviour and weight loss are the consequences of these accumulating deficits, which associate with cognitive decline and result in increasing social isolation. The primary form of sarcopenia is the decrease of the energy production of muscle cells and then the death of muscle cells. Se­con­dary, endocrine dysfunctions, diseases of the nervous system, decreased physical activity, malnutrition or malabsorption, chronic infection accelerate the process and aggravate the patient’s condition. Complex genetic, biochemical and endocrine mechanisms take part in the development of sarcopenia. This involution is due to the impaired balance of restoring and depleting processes of muscles. A questionnaire and algorithm have been developed to recognize, screen and diagnose the risks of sarcopenic condition; these separate the sarcopenic and non-sarcopenic patients with specific cut-off values. Sar­co­penia can be diagnosed based on walking speed, decreased handgrip strength and measured or calculated muscle mass in persons over 65. Sarcopenia can be considered as a phenomenon of “physiological” aging, however, it becomes a disease when diagnostic cut-offs are exceeded and the patient experiences functional disability and declining quality of life. Prevention and treatment of sarcopenia and reducing the risk of falling are based on regular active resistance and coordination exercises. Options for pharmaceutical treatments are limited since despite of identified molecular targets there are no convincingly effective innovative therapy on the horizon. Nevertheless, there are some weak evidence for efficacy of the application of amino acids stimulating muscle cell differentiation, such as leucine or the analogue of beta-hydoxy-methylbutyrate beside exercise therapy.]

Clinical Neuroscience

JULY 30, 2020

[Decisional collisions between evidence and experience based medicine in care of people with epilepsy]

RAJNA Péter

[Background – Based on the literature and his long-term clinical practice the author stresses the main collisions of evidence and experience based medicine in the care of people with epilepsy. Purpose – To see, what are the professional decisions of high responsibility in the epilepsy-care, in whose the relevant clinical research is still lacking or does not give a satisfactory basis. Methods – Following the structure of the Hungarian Guideline the author points the critical situations and decisions. He explains also the causes of the dilemmas: the lack or uncertainty of evidences or the difficulty of scientific investigation of the situation. Results – There are some priorities of experience based medicine in the following areas: definition of epilepsy, classification of seizures, etiology – including genetic background –, role of precipitating and provoking factors. These are able to influence the complex diagnosis. In the pharmacotherapy the choice of the first drug and the optimal algorithm as well as the tasks during the care are also depends on personal experiences sometimes contradictory to the official recommendations. Same can occur in the choice of the non-pharmacological treatments and rehabilitation. Discussion and conclusion – Personal professional experiences (and interests of patients) must be obligatory accessories of evidence based attitude, but for achieving the optimal results, in some situations they replace the official recommendations. Therefore it is very important that the problematic patients do meet experts having necessary experiences and also professional responsibility to help in these decisions. ]

Clinical Neuroscience

MARCH 30, 2016

Cerebral amyloid angiopathy related inflammation: is susceptibility weighted imaging the clue for diagnosis?

CSÉCSEI Péter, KOMOLY Sámuel, SZAPÁRY László, BARSI Péter

Background - Cerebral amyloid angiopathy-related inflammation (CAA-ri) is characterized by various neurological symptoms such as gradually developing confusion, progressive cognitive decline, seizure or headaches; T2 hyperintensities on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI); and neuropathological evidence of cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) and associated vascular or perivascular inflammation. Although histological confirmation is necessary for accurate diagnosis, in case of typical clinical features and neuroimaging, the diagnosis can be established without biopsy. Case summary - We present the case of a 57-year-old man with a history of hypertension who presented to the emer¬gency department 3-week history of progressive headache and a gradually developing altered mental status. On examination, he was found to have left sided weakness and decreased pscyhomotility. Routine clinical work-up (lab investigations, CT, cerebrospinal fluid analysis) did not show obvious diagnosis, so we performed an MRI. It raised the suspicion of CAA-ri which diagnosis was verified by neuroradiological evaluation. High dose steroid treatment was initiated. The patient rapidly responded to treatment, his focal neurological signs resolved. Control MRI after 1.5 months showed multiple haemorrhagic laesions in the field of previous inflammation which posteriorly supported the previous supposed work-diagnosis. Conclusions - Although histopathology is the gold standard for the diagnosis of cerebral amyloid angiopathy, the typical clinical presentation, good response to steroids and accurate neuroradiological criteria make biopsy unnecessary to diagnose CAA-ri.

Clinical Neuroscience

JANUARY 30, 2016

To treat or not to treat, cheyne-stokes respiration in a young adult with vascular encephalopathy

HUBATSCH Mihaela, ENGLERT Harald, WAGNER Ulrich

Cheyne-Stokes respiration (CSR) is a form of sleep-disordered breathing characterised by recurrent central sleep apnoea alternating with a crescendo-decrescendo pattern of tidal volume, relatively rare observation in sleep labs. It is mainly seen in severe heart failure and stroke. We report the case of a young man with CSR after sudden onset of seizure in the context of hypertensive exacerbation leading to the diagnosis of a leukoencephalopathy, and comment on differential diagnoses, prognostic and therapeutic outcomes. The very uniqueness of this case consists in the extremely young age for developing a vascular encephalopathy in the absence of genetic diseases and without previous diagnose of hypertension. There is no adequate explanation for the origin of vascular encephalopathy; also there is lack of evidence regarding the benefits and modality of treatment for CSR in neurologic diseases. Thus, we were forced to find the best compromise in a nocturnal oxygen therapy and follow-up.

Clinical Neuroscience

JANUARY 30, 2020

[Correction of the physiological artefacts at pre-surgical clinical functional MR]

KISS Máté, GÁL Andor Viktor, KOZÁK Lajos Rudolf, MARTOS János, NAGY Zoltán

[Introduction/aim of the study - Pre-surgical functional MRI (fMRI) is an important modality of examinations before brain surgery. There are several artefacts (e.g. motion, susceptibility) which may hinder the evaluation of fMRI data. Physiological artefacts (breathing, pulsation) also affect the sensitivity and specificity of anatomical localization. The aim of this study is to demonstrate the efficiency of physiological artefact identification and removal methods for presurgical evaluation. Materials and methods - Siemens Magnetom Verio 3T MRI scanner was used to collect data. The physiological parameters (breathing, pulse) were recorded with the MRI system’s built-in devices. Data from fourteen patients - with primary brain tumour - were evaluated with SPM12 utilizing the RETROICOR/RVHR tool to detect and decrease the effect of physiological artefacts. We compared the statistical maps obtained with and without the physiological correction using the Jaccard similarity coefficient, and ROI analyses. Results - Significant differences were found in the mean ROI values (p<0.0016) and the extensions of eloquent activations (p<0.0013), when using the physiological correction (RETORICOR/RVHR) based on convolution method. On the other hand, no significant differences were found between the ROIs’ standard deviations (F=0.28). The RETROICOR/ RVHR method helps to define the precise localisation of eloquent areas (p<0.009). The number of irrelevant (non-significant) voxels were increased (p<0.001). Conclusions - Minimising of physiological artefacts in fMRI data calculations, the (RETROICOR/RVHR) method based on convolution has been successfully adapted. This algorithm could be helpful before neurosurgical intervention. The activity pattern became more reliable. ]

Clinical Oncology

APRIL 10, 2019

[Current views on the male breast cancer]

BAKI Márta

[Breast cancer in men is a rare disease, and accounts for only 1% of all diagnosed breast cancers. Hungarian incidence by available data much higher. The greatest risk factor of male breast cancer the elevated estrogen concentration in the body. Genetic disorders, as a Klinefelter syndrome and estrogen exposures and other metabolic changes might cause the male breast cancer. Symptom duration is longer than female population and the male breast cancers diagnosed in older ages and advanced stages. Frequency of BRCA2 mutation is probably 10% among male patients. The most common type is invasive ductal carcinoma with estrogen and progesterone receptor positivity. Diagnostic, surgical, radiation procedures and chemotherapy probably same as female breast cancer. The guidelines recommend as in adjuvant and curative setting the tamoxifen and other selective estrogen receptor modulators treatment. By large nation based registry the survival rate is different from male and female breast cancers. New biomarkers, genetic changes are under investigation to understand munch better the male breast cancer.]

Clinical Oncology

FEBRUARY 20, 2019

[Practical use of meta-analyses in predicting disease risk, outcome, and therapy response in breast cancer]

KAHÁN Zsuzsanna, TARI Gergely, ENYEDI Márton, HARACSKA Lajos

[Germinal BRCA status infl uences patient care both in early and advanced/metastatic breast cancer. Ideally, the patient should make the decision on the type of surgery or the avoidance of radiotherapy being aware of the BRCA status; based on the most recent clinical studies, this knowledge may infl uence the type of chemotherapy in the neoadjuvant, adjuvant, or metastatic setting or may raise the use of emerging targeted therapies. DNA-targeting cytostatic agents, mostly platinum agents and PARP inhibitors that act by inducing synthetic lethality, provide specifi c therapies in BRCA-mutant cases. The optimum place and sequence of these specifi c agents in treatment, however, are not known yet. International guidelines promote BRCA testing for the specifi cation of treatment strategy in all HER2-negative advanced/metastatic breast cancer cases (NCCN) or at least in all cases when, based on certain predictors, the presence of mutations is likely (ESMO). Recently, the methods employed for BRCA testing have improved immensely and are widely available through the services of various providers. For the identifi cation of the mutation, sequencing of the whole genes is needed, which can be achieved faster and more cost-effi ciently using next-generation sequencing (NGS) platforms compared to previous methods. It is the responsibility of the physician to consider the possibility of BRCA mutations and to raise the issue of BRCA testing to the patient if the family history, the age, previous malignant disease(s) of the patient, or the cancer features are suggestive of genetic risk.]