Lege Artis Medicinae

[THE ROLE OF HYDROMORPHONE IN PAIN KILLING]

TELEKES András

OCTOBER 19, 2008

Lege Artis Medicinae - 2008;18(10)

[The hydromorphone is a potent semisynthetic opioid agonist which is available in several forms including injection immediately release or retard tablets. Its analgesic efficacy surpasses morphine. The absorption of oral osmotic retard tablet is independent from food- or alcoholconsumption providing steady plasma concentration by once daily application. The clinical pharmacology of hydromorphone is summarized.]

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