Lege Artis Medicinae

[BASICS OF MRI MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING]

MARTOS János

SEPTEMBER 18, 2004

Lege Artis Medicinae - 2004;14(08-09)

[Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a young, developing technology used to create images with extraordinary detail of body tissue or the brain by applying nuclear magnetic resonance phenomena. The MRI technique uses a pulse of radio-frequency energy to excite the hydrogen nuclei, the protons. The distribution of hydrogen nuclei of water and fat in the body depends on the tissue type and whether or not the tissue is healthy or diseased. The image brightness is a complex function of properties in the region of interest, which include parameters of protons density and the relaxation times of the protons. Manipulating these properties is accomplished by varying the experiment (pulse sequence) used at the time of examination to yield images that contains different contrast. Although MRI is normally a noninvasive technique, contrast agents can be administered to a subject to enhance a region of interest. There are now more than 22,000 MR systems in use worldwide. MR is one of the best diagnostic exams for imaging many types of soft-tissue including: the brain, the spine, the heart, aorta and coronary arteries, the organs of the upper abdomen and the pelvis as well as the joints.]

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Lege Artis Medicinae

[THE PUBLIC OPINION ON ORGAN DONATION IN HUNGARY]

SZÁNTÓ Zsuzsa, SUSÁNSZKY Éva, TÜTTŐ Gabriella

[INTRODUCTION - The aim of this study was to explore the common knowledge and the opinion of the Hungarian population on organ transplants as part of a larger international study about the reception of new achievements in biotechnology and medical science. METHODS - The basis of the study was a representative national survey conducted in 2003 on a sample of 1000 people. We analysed the significant differences in the attitudes towards organ donation using the background variables of gender, age, education, family situation, place of residence, self-rated health and religious beliefs. To explain the differences in the willingness to donate we applied the method of binomial regression. Logistic regression was used to analyse the strength and direction of the linear relationship between dependent and predictor variables. The probability of willingness in a given group was represented by odds ratios. RESULTS - The respondents’ knowledge level differed by gender, age and education. The greater part of the population was not knowledgeable about the legal regulations concerning the transplantation of cadaver organs but after they were properly informed they agreed with the regulations. The odds of the motivation to donate organs after death differed significantly by age, education, family situation and self-rated health. The motivation to be living donors was influenced by age, place of residence and the level of altruism. CONCLUSION - The concerns expressed on the decrease of donation willingness due to the increase of the knowledge level of the population seem to be unfounded.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Abdominal compartment syndrome: the cause of postinjury multiple organ failure. Summary of the article]

BALOGH Zsolt, MCKINLEY BA, COX CS Jr, ALLENS SJ, COCANOUR CS, KOZAR RA, MOORE EE, MILLER CC, WEISBRODT NW, MOORE FA

Lege Artis Medicinae

[RARE UTERINE MALIGNANCY: THE ENDOMETRIAL ADENOSARCOMA]

TARJÁN Miklós, SÁPI Zoltán, BENTZIK András, CSERNI Gábor

[INTRODUCTION - Müllerian adenosarcoma is typically composed of benign glandular epithelial elements admixed with malignant sarcomatous stroma. This rare tumour usually originates in the endometrium and grows as a polypoid mass into the endometrial cavity. CASE REPORT - We report the case of a woman aged 32, who presented with abnormal vaginal bleeding and was diagnosed with an adenosarcoma after a curettage and subsequent hysterectomy. CONCLUSION - This tumour has a relatively good prognosis among the mixed mesenchymal sarcomas of the uterus and the majority of patients with this neoplasm survive. The gynecologists and pathologists should be aware of this entity and discuss the risks and benefits of radiation and chemotherapy, which is usually indicated for malignant diseases.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

[The diagnosis and therapy of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease - Recommendation of the 2003 consensus conference]

BÖSZÖRMÉNYI Nagy György

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Adult Basic Life Support Resuscitation Guidelines of the Hungarian Resuscitation Society]

TÓTH Zoltán, DIÓSZEGHY Csaba, GŐBL Gábor, HORNYÁK István, HAUSER Balázs

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Intracranial localization of Ewing’s sarcoma is considerably very rare. Herein, we present clinical and neuroimaging findings regarding a 4-year-old boy with intracranial Ewing’s sarcoma. He was born prematurely, suffered intraventricular haemorrhage, posthaemorrhagic hydrocephalus developed, and a ventriculoperitoneal shunt was inserted in the newborn period. The patient endured re­gular follow ups, no signs of shunt malfunction nor increased intracranial pressure were observed. The last neuroima­ging examination was performed at 8 months of age. Upon reaching the age of 4 years, repeated vomiting and focal seizures began, and symptoms of increased intracranial pressure were detected. A brain MRI depicted a left frontoparietal space-occupying lesion infiltrating the superior sagittal sinus. The patient underwent a craniotomy resulting in the total excision of the tumour. The histological examination of the tissue revealed a small round blue cell tumour. The diagnosis was confirmed by the detection of EWSR1 gene translocation with FISH (fluorescent in situ hybridization). No additional metastases were detected during the staging examinations. The patient was treated in accordance to the EuroEwing 99 protocol. Today, ten years onward, the patient is tumour and seizure free and has a reasonably high quality of life.

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