LAM KID

[Stop at one - Make your first break your last!]

NÉMETH Éva

DECEMBER 10, 2012

LAM KID - 2012;2(04)

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LAM KID

[Adherence of Hungarian postmenopausal women with osteoporosis]

LAKATOS Péter, TÓTH Emese, LANG Zsolt, NAGY Bence, SZEKERES László, TAKÁCS István

[INTRODUCTION - Osteoporosis is defined as a loss of bone tissue and bone mass that leads to a compromised trength and quality of bones and thus to an increased risk of fractures. In many women, menopausal hormonal changes are associated with an increased bone loss. This population has postmenopausal osteoporosis. The essence of osteporosis treatment is the adequate calcium and vitamin D supplementation, which, if needed, might be combined with drug therapy to inhibit the process of bone loss. METHODS - We assessed the adherence to therapy of Hungarian patients and its effect on the risk of bone fractures, using data recorded by the National Health Insurance Fund Administration between 2004 and 2010 (n=223068, mean age: 69.9 years). We performed a statistical analyses of the available data. Medication possession ratio (MPR) for each treatment and the ratio of patients receiving continuous treatment in the study period (for 12, 18 and 24 months) were estimated. Medication persistence was investigated using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. A multivariate Cox proportional hazard model was used to determine the factors influencing the risk of fracture. RESULTS, CONCLUSION - The results of our study show that medication adherence to treatment is low among Hungarian patients [mean MPR: 57.9%; 95% CI (57.7%- 58.0%) and persistence rate: 32.4%; 95% CI (32.2%-32.6%) in the first year]. These parameters are substantially influenced by the administration route and the frequency of treatments [mean MPR ranged 41.5%- 100% and persistence rates ranged 18.8%- 100% in the first year, differences between subgroups were significant (p<0,05)]. Our compliance as well as persistance studies showed that parenteral administration had more beneficial effects. Confirming our preliminary hypotheses, the improvement of patient compliance significantly reduced fracture risk (good compliance was defined as MPR>80%, which was associated with RR: 0.57, p<0.05 for fracture risk). Further improvement might be achieved by parenteral administration [RR for fracture risk 0.60 compared with non-compliant patients and 0.44 compared with compliant subgroups treated with oral and parenteral medications (p<0.05)].]

LAM KID

[The effects of targeted therapies on bones]

SZEKANECZ Zoltán

[Arthritis is associated with local as well as generalised bone loss. It is likely that similar inflammatory/immunological factors contribute to both types of bone loss. Today, the main targets of arthritis therapy are proinflammatory citokines (TNF-alpha, IL-1, IL-6, in the future IL-17) and the inhibition of B and T cells. All biological therapies have been proved to slow down the development of focal joint destruction. TNF-inhibitors in particular have been demonstrated to have a beneficial effect on generalised osteoporosis. In ankylosing spondylitis, generalised osteoporosis and locally increased bone formation occur at the same time, creating a controversial situation. Further studies are needed for a better understanding of the effects of targeted therapy on bones.]

LAM KID

[The importance of balneotherapy in osteology]

BENDER Tamás, KULISCH Ágota, KOVÁCS Csaba, HORVÁTH Katalin, GYARMATI Noémi, TEFNER Ildikó

[The authors overview the role of hydro-and balneotherapy in osteology. AsHungary is very rich in thermal-mineralwater, this kind of therapy has a greatimportance in the rehabilitation of locomo-tor diseases. In the past years, an increasingnumber of data have been published aboutthe immunomodulatory, metabolic andanalgesic role of hydro- and balneothera-py. Although balneotherapy’s mechanismof action has not been clarified yet, a num-ber of reviews and metaanalyses havefound that hydro- and balneotherapy havea beneficial effect on locomotor diseases.The majority of these articles - many ofthem written by Hungarian authors - dis-cusses the treatment of arthrosis. Further-more, an increasing amount of data isavailable on calcium supplementation withmineral water. In this paper, we discuss therole of hydro- and balneotherapy in thetherapy of osteological diseases, on thebasis of the available evidence. ]

LAM KID

[Diffusely increasing neck fat mass]

LAM KID

[Effect of zoledronic acid treatment on pain and quality of life in patients with metastatic bone disease suffering from breast and prostate cancer - Multicenter, prospective, observational study]

PÁPAI Zsuzsanna, LANDHERR László, SPEER Gábor

[INTRODUCTION - Metastatic bone disease is frequently associated with breast and prostate cancer. Bisphosphonate treatment of bone metastases is palliative: its primary goal is to relieve pain, while it's also important to decrease the risk of bone fractures, prolong survival and maintain physical activity of the patients. Pain is the most common symptom of bone metastases. PATIENTS AND METHODS - In total 845 patients were enrolled in our open, multicenter, prospective, observational study, the first of its kind in Hungary. The agent tested was zoledronic acid (Zometa®). Duration of the study was 20 months and its primary goal was to assess the correlation between pain and quality of life during the treatment of patients with bone metastases from breast or prostate carcinoma. RESULTS - During the 18 months of the study, the average intensity of pain, measured on the visual analog scale showed a 42% reduction (p<0.0001). By the end of the 18. month, the ratio of patients free of symptoms has increased by 15% and the number of patients with substantial complaints has decreased by 73%. CONCLUSION - Our study supports the observation published in the international literature that in patients with bone metastases from breast and prostate cancer, zoledronic acid treatment is beneficial for reducing pain and thus for improving quality of life.]

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Clinical Neuroscience

[Zonisamide: one of the first-line antiepileptic drugs in focal epilepsy ]

JANSZKY József, HORVÁTH Réka, KOMOLY Sámuel

[Chronic administration of antiepileptic drugs without history of unprovoked epileptic seizures are not recommended for epilepsy prophylaxis. Conversely, if the patient suffered the first unprovoked seizure, then the presence of epileptiform discharges on the EEG, focal neurological signs, and the presence of epileptogenic lesion on the MRI are risk factors for a second seizure (such as for the development of epilepsy). Without these risk factors, the chance of a second seizure is about 25-30%, while the presence of these risk factors (for example signs of previous stroke, neurotrauma, or encephalitis on the MRI) can predict >70% seizure recurrence. Thus the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) re-defined the term ’epilepsy’ which can be diagnosed even after the first seizure, if the risk of seizure recurrence is high. According to this definition, we can start antiepileptic drug therapy after a single unprovoked seizure. There are four antiepileptic drugs which has the highest evidence (level „A”) as first-line initial monotherapy for treating newly diagnosed epilepsy. These are: carbamazepine, phenytoin, levetiracetam, and zonisamide (ZNS). The present review focuses on the ZNS. Beacuse ZNS can be administrated once a day, it is an optimal drug for maintaining patient’s compliance and for those patients who have a high risk for developing a non-compliance (for example teenagers and young adults). Due to the low interaction potential, ZNS treatment is safe and effective in treating epilepsy of elderly people. ZNS is an ideal drug in epilepsy accompanied by obesity, because ZNS has a weight loss effect, especially in obese patients.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Interdisciplinary approach of vestibular system impairment]

PONGRÁCZ Endre

[In the first part of this review the definition of vertigo/dizziness was discussed. The major difference between the two signs is the exsistence of the direction, which is specific for vertigo. Dizziness is a frequent complaint in the clinical practice. Its frequency is increasing with advance of age, to intimate the play of declining cognitive process in the pathogenesis of its. The popular health significance of vertigo is in the rowing number of the patients. The onset of the most cases with acute vertigo appears between secundums and minutes so the patients will be provided in circumstances of emergency department. First of all three form schould be take into account: neuronitis vestibularis, benign paroxysmal positional vertigo and Meniere syndrome. Without tipical periferal signs of vertigo, central cause should be searched, principally stroke (lysis possibility). The differential diagnose of the different dizzeness/vertigo forms according to the elapsed time of the onset or congenital and acquired nystagmus was created in tables. The recommendations of the therapy of acute and chronic dizziness/ vertigo syndroms are, lack of results of evidence based trials doubtful. The more often used drugs based on clinical trials are discussed as vinpocetine, betahistine and piracetam. The in vitro and in vivo data suggest that the last molecule is eligible to use both in periferal and central type of vertigo syndroms.]

Clinical Neuroscience

Simultaneous subdural, subarachnoideal and intracerebral hAemorrhage after rupture of a peripheral middle cerebral artery aneurysm

BÉRES-MOLNÁR Anna Katalin, FOLYOVICH András, SZLOBODA Péter, SZENDREY-KISS Zsolt, BERECZKI Dániel, BAKOS Mária, VÁRALLYAY György, SZABÓ Huba, NYÁRI István

The cause of intracerebral, subarachnoid and subdural haemorrhage is different, and the simultaneous appearance in the same case is extremely rare. We describe the case of a patient with a ruptured aneurysm on the distal segment of the middle cerebral artery, with a concomitant subdural and intracerebral haemorrhage, and a subsequent secondary brainstem (Duret) haemorrhage. The 59-year-old woman had hypertension and diabetes in her medical history. She experienced anomic aphasia and left-sided headache starting one day before admission. She had no trauma. A few minutes after admission she suddenly became comatose, her breathing became superficial. Non-contrast CT revealed left sided fronto-parietal subdural and subarachnoid and intracerebral haemorrhage, and bleeding was also observed in the right pontine region. The patient had leucocytosis and hyperglycemia but normal hemostasis. After the subdural haemorrhage had been evacuated, the patient was transferred to intensive care unit. Sepsis developed. Echocardiography did not detect endocarditis. Neurological status, vigilance gradually improved. The rehabilitation process was interrupted by epileptic status. Control CT and CT angiography proved an aneurysm in the peripheral part of the left middle cerebral artery, which was later clipped. Histolo­gical examination excluded mycotic etiology of the aneu­rysm and “normal aneurysm wall” was described. The brain stem haemorrhage – Duret bleeding – was presumably caused by a sudden increase in intracranial pressure due to the supratentorial space occupying process and consequential trans-tentorial herniation. This case is a rarity, as the patient not only survived, but lives an active life with some residual symptoms.

Clinical Neuroscience

[Earlier and more efficiently: the role of deep brain stimulation for parkinson’s disease preserving the working capabilities]

GABRIELLA BALÁS, ISTVÁN KOMOLY, SÁMUEL DÓCZI, TAMÁS JANSZKY, JÓZSEF ASCHERMANN, ZSUZSANNA NAGY, FERENC BOSNYÁK, EDIT KOVÁCS

[Background – The recently published “EarlyStim” study demonstrated that deep brain stimulation (DBS) for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease (PD) with early fluctuations is superior to the optimal pharmacological treatment in improving the quality of life and motor symptoms, and preserving sociocultural position. Our retrospective investigation aimed to evaluate if DBS therapy was able to preserve the working capabilities of our patients. Methods – We reviewed the data of 39 young (<60 years-old) PD patients who underwent subthalamic DBS implantation at University of Pécs and had at least two years follow-up. Patients were categorized into two groups based on their working capabilities: Patients with active job (“Job+” group, n=15) and retired patients (without active job, “Job-” group, n=24). Severity of motor symptoms (UPDRS part 3), quality of life (EQ-5D) and presence of active job were evaluated one and two years after the operation. Results – As far as the severity of motor symptoms were concerned, similar (approximately 50%) improvement was achieved in both groups. However, the postoperative quality of life was significantly better in the Job+ group. Majority (12/15, 80%) of Job+ group members were able to preserve their job two years after the operation. However, only a minimal portion (1/24, 4.2%) of the Job- group members was able to return to the world of active employees (p<0.01, McNemar test). Conclusion – Although our retrospective study has several limitations, our results fit well with the conclusions of “EarlyStim” study. Both of them suggest that with optimal timing of DBS implantation we may preserve the working capabilities of our patients.]

Clinical Neuroscience

The effects of the level of spinal cord injury on life satisfaction and disability

GULSAH Karatas, NESLIHAN Metli, ELIF Yalcin, RAMAZAN Gündüz, FATIH Karatas, MÜFIT Akyuz

Introduction - Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) may often lead to significant disability in affected individuals and reduce life satisfaction. Herein we aimed to investigate the effects of the level of injury on disability and life satisfaction as well as the relation between life satisfaction and disability. Methods - Patients with at least one-year history of SCI were included. Demographic-clinical data of patients were recorded. The Craig Handicap Assessment and Reporting Technique-Short Form (CHART-SF) was used for quantifying the degree of patients’ disability. Life satisfaction was assessed by the Satisfaction with Life Scale (SWLS). Results - Of the 76 patients, 21 (27.6%) were tetraplegic and 55 (72.4%) were paraplegic. SWLS was found to be similar in tetraplegic vs. paraplegic patients (P=0.59), whereas CHART parameters such as physical independence, mobility, occupation, and total CHART value were significantly higher in paraplegic patients (P=0.04, P=0.04, P=0.001 and P=0.01, respectively). Social integration was found similarly high in both groups. There was a positive correlation between elapsed time after the injury and CHART physical independence, occupation and the level of economic sufficiency (P<0.01, P<0.01, P=0.01). Excluding the economic sufficiency (P=0.02), there was not any other association between the rest of CHART parameters and SWLS. Conclusions - According to our findings, although the level of injury seems to be influential on disability, it seems to have no significant effect on life satisfaction. Since the only thing that positively affects life satisfaction is economic sufficiency, more emphasis should be placed on regulations that increase the return to work in patients.