LAM KID

[About the culture of the alcohol]

DÁNIEL Zsolt

MARCH 30, 2014

LAM KID - 2014;4(01)

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Further articles in this publication

LAM KID

[Recomendation for medical checkup and therapy of renal stone disease]

TISLÉR András, MÁTYUS János

LAM KID

[Calcium and vitamin D disparities are related to gender, age, race, household income level, and weight in the United States]

BALLA Bernadett

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[News in the therapy of gout]

BODNÁR Nóra

LAM KID

[Does the vitamin K2 play a role in the prevention or treatment of osteoporosis? - a systematic review]

SZILI Balázs, TAKÁCS István

[The physiological role of vitamin K in blood clotting and bone metabolism is well known. A number of articles have been published recently about the effects of vitamin K2 on bone. Non-professional media promotes vitamin K2 as a potent tool for the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis. Nevertheless vitamin K2 is not included in either Hungarian, or European, or Ameri­can guidelines as an anti-osteoporotic me­dication. Our aim was to review the literature and provide a systematic review on the role of vitamin K2 in the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis. We have searched articles on http://pubmed.org available on 14. February 2014. Our search terms were: („vitamin K2” OR „menaquinon” OR „MK-7” OR „menantrenon”) AND „osteoporosis”. We have only reviewed original articles that discussed the relationship of vitamin K2 and osteoporosis, and had at least the abstract available in English. Of the 155 articles found, 135 had a relevant topic, 126 had at least the abstract in English. Of these, 73 were original articles, including 44 human studies (8 double-blind, controlled, 26 open-label, controlled, 5 observational and 5 cross-sectional studies) and 29 animal or in vitro models. In the non-Asian population there is no evidence for fracture-preventing or BMD-increasing effect of vitamin K2 treatment. The currently recommended anti-osteoporotic medications are significantly more efficient compared with the BMD increase observed in some Asian studies. ]

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[Pre and perinatal diagnostics in the mirror of molecular genetics]

HORVÁTH Örs Péter, KÓSA János Pál

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Acute bilateral drop foot as a complication of prolonged squatting due to haemorrhoid

KOKSAL Ayhan, DOGAN Burcu Vasfiye

Drop foot is defined as difficulty of dorsiflexion of the foot and ankle due to weak anterior tibial, extensor hallucis longus and extensor digitorum longus muscles. Cauda equina syndrome, local peroneal nerve damage due to trauma, nerve entrapment, compartment syndrome and tumors are common etiologies. A 32-year-old male patient was applied with difficulty in dorsiflexion of both of his toes, feet and ankles after he had squatted in toilette for 6-7 hours (because of his haemorrhoid) after intense alcohol intake 2 weeks before. Acute, partial, demyelinating lesion in head of fibula segment of peroneal nerves was diagnosed by electromyography. This case was reported since prolonged squatting is an extremely rare cause of acute bilateral peroneal neuropathy. This type of neuropathy is mostly demyelination and has good prognosis with physical therapy and mechanical devices, but surgical intervention may be required due to axonal damage. People such as workers and farmers working in the squatting position for long hours should be advised to change their position as soon as the compression symptoms (numbness, tingling) appear.

Clinical Neuroscience

Marchiafava-Bignami disease: Report of three cases

GUNAY Gul, MESUDE Özerden, ZEYNEP Ozdemir, CAHIT Keskinkiliç, HAKAN Selçuk, BATUHAN Kara, AYSUN Soysal

Marchiafava-Bignami disease (MBD) is a rare alcohol-associated disorder characterized by demyelination and necrosis of the corpus callosum. We report three patients who had history of chronic alcoholism, different clinical presentation and MRI findings consistent with the diagnosis of Marchiafava-Bignami disease.

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Risk factors for ischemic stroke and stroke subtypes in patients with chronic kidney disease

GÜLER Siber, NAKUS Engin, UTKU Ufuk

Background - The aim of this study was to compare ischemic stroke subtypes with the effects of risk factors, the relationship between grades of kidney disease and the severity of stroke subtypes. Methods - The current study was designed retrospectively and performed with data of patients who were hospitalised due to ischemic stroke. We included 198 subjects who were diagnosed with ischemic stroke of Grade 3 and above with chronic kidney disease. Results - In our study were reported advanced age, coronary artery disease, moderate kidney disease as the most frequent risk factors for cardioembolic etiology. Hypertension, hyperlipidemia, smoking and alcohol consumption were the most frequent risk factors for large-artery disease. Female sex and anaemia were the most frequent risk factors for small-vessel disease. Dialysis and severe kidney disease were the most frequent risk factors in unknown etiologies, while male sex, diabetes mellitus, prior stroke and mild kidney disease were the most frequent risk factors for other etiologies. National Institute of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) scores were lower for small-vessel disease compared with other etiologies. This relation was statistically significant (p=0.002). Conclusion - In order to improve the prognosis in ischemic stroke with chronic kidney disease, the risk factors have to be recognised and the treatment options must be modified according to those risk factors.

Lege Artis Medicinae

[THE ROLE OF THE CONSUMPTION OF HOT FOOD AND DRINK IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF OESOPHAGEAL SQUAMOUS CELL CARCINOMA]

SZÁNTÓ Imre, ENDER Ferenc, BANAI János, ALTORJAY Áron, SELI Artúr, FARSANG Zoltán, VÖRÖS Attila

[INTRODUCTION - Potential risk factors leading to the development of squamous cell carcinoma in the oesophagus have been analyzed and summarized in a number of epidemiological studies. Authors disagree as to the pathogenic significance of the individual risk factors in various populations. However, it is commonly accepted that alcohol abuse and smoking play a significant role in the development of this disease. Several reports have suggested a positive relationship between oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma and the consumption of hot food and drink. A recent publication, however, claims that the consumption of hot drink is not a pathogenic factor in itself. In our study we wished either to confirm or to rule out a positive relationship between the development of oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma and the history of consuming hot food or drink. PATIENTS AND METHODS - During the study period (1 January, 1993 - 31 September, 2004) 449 patients with oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma were examined in our endoscopy laboratory. Histories were taken according to a predefined scheme. The aim was to identify patients with a history of consuming hot food or drink and to determine their percentage within the study population. A group of 738 patients examined endoscopically for indications other than oesophageal cancer served as controls. RESULTS - In the control group a significantly higher proportion of patients tended to consume hot food or drink compared to patients with cancer. Among the patients with oesophageal tumour who consumed hot food or drink a higher proportion was addicted to smoking and alcohol compared to the control group. CONCLUSIONS - In our study population we failed to identify a positive relationship between the development of squamous cell carcinoma in the oesophagus and the habit of consuming hot food or drink. We suggest that consumption of hot food or drink may play some role in the development of oesophageal cancer if it is associated with simultaneous smoking and alcohol consumption.]

LAM Extra for General Practicioners

[ORAL CARCINOMA AND ITS PREBLASTOMATOSES: THE ROLE OF PAPILLOMAVIRUS INFECTION AND THE PROSPECTS OF EARLY DIAGNOSIS]

DECSI Gábor, TARNAI Zsófia, ZSEDÉNYI Ádám, BUZÁS Krisztina, NAGY Katalin, SONKODI István, MINÁROVITS János

[The high incidence of oral carcinoma in Hungary is attributed primarily to tobacco and alcohol use. Recently, however, a series of publications suggested a role for humán papillomavirus in the development of oral carcinoma. For this reason we reviewed the literature regarding the associations of human papillomavirus with oral carcinoma and its preblastomatoses. We also overviewed research aiming to develop reliable methods for early diagnosis that are also suitable for screening. Early diagnosis and treatment may significantly improve the prospects of the patient. In addition, the addition of already available human papilloma virus vaccines into national vaccination programs and the extension of vaccination for both sexes may decrease the prevalence of oral carcinoma associated with human papillomavirus infection that primarily affects younger populations.]