Journal of Nursing Theory and Practice

[Intracystic brachytherapy of cystic brain tumors by image fusion method- intracavital beta irradiation of 90-Yttrium solution]

BALLÁNÉ PERDUK Anikó1,2, JULOW Jenő2

APRIL 30, 2015

Journal of Nursing Theory and Practice - 2015;28(02)

[Aim of the research: The authors aimed to gain acceptance, effectiveness testing and the timetable of the shrinking of the cysts for the treatment procedure of patients with cystic craniopharyngeoma. The procedure utilizes intracavitary beta irradiation by 90Y colloidal solution. Image fusion was used for the first time for the guidance and control of the intra cystic irradiation of brain tumors. The authors also examined the use of the image fusion for brachytherapy of brain tumors before, during, and months or even years after surgery and to patient follow up. Research and sampling methods: 130 craniopharyngeoma cyst was irradiated with the Yttrium-90 colloidal solution in 84 patients. The internal wall of the cyst were getting a load of 180-300 Gy. The volumes of the cysts were followed almost over 30 years by the control of CT-MRI image fusion. For the planning of the irradiation the authors developed their own software and BrainLab was used for the CT-MRI-PET image fusion. For the mathematical and statistical calculation Matlab and MedCalc soft wares were utilized. Results: The results were from 130, 90Y β stereotactic intracavitary irradiation of cystic craniopharyngiomas. As per cystic CRF volume the volume reduction exceeded 80 %. The mean survival rate following 90-Y irradiation was 7.5 years. Large-scale shrinkage of craniopharyngioma cysts were observed significantly, following 6 months. Conclusions: According to long term clinical experience the intracavitary 90 Yttrium brachytherapy is a relatively non-invasive and effective mode for the recurrent cystic craniopharyngeoma therapy. Procedures where isotope get implanted, qualify in all aspects of a minimally invasive therapy.]

AFFILIATIONS

  1. Semmelweis Egyetem Egészségtudományi Kar
  2. Szent János Kórház és Észak-Budai Egyesített Kórházak, Idegsebészeti Osztály

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