Journal of Nursing Theory and Practice

[How it all started: Untold Chapters of Nursing History in Hungary as testified by foxed Documents Part 2.]

SÖVÉNYI Ferencné, PERKÓ Magdolna, FEDINECZNÉ VITTAY Katalin

FEBRUARY 28, 2018

Journal of Nursing Theory and Practice - 2018;31(01)

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Journal of Nursing Theory and Practice

[Nursing Difficulties during the Treatment of Patients from different Cultures]

ČERVENÝ Martin, KILÍKOVÁ Mária

[Introduction: Inspecting the difficulties of Hungarian nurses during the treatment of patients from different cultures. Materials and methods: Anonymous online questionnaire for the subjective examination of nursing difficulties. Results: The research model consists of 122 responder. Specific questions were answered by applicable 111 responders only. It was discovered that communication is a significant difficulty for 56.76% of the respondents (63 people). Furthermore the patients from different cultures show significant distrust towards the nursing staff. Conclusion: The numbers of lessons in foreign languages need to be increased for Hungarian nurses, researches and presentations are needed in the area of multicultural patient care, communicational instructions and further trainings are required for nurses working in practice.]

Journal of Nursing Theory and Practice

[Sleep Disorders among ICU Patients]

PUSZTAI Dorina Erzsébet, FULLÉR Noémi

[Aim: To examine the changes of sleep quality and quantity among patinets in the intensive care unit, to determine the factors which have influence on sleeping and to bare the methods that can help to optimize sleeping. Theme and method: During a quantitative, longitudinal research 82 patients datas and questionnaire answers were analysed. In Microsoft Excel and SPSS 22.0 program we used c2-probe, T-probe, linear regression, Mann-Whitney U probe, descriptive statistics (p<0.05) Results: In comparison of the sleep quality and quantity, both variables changed in negative direction in ICU. The most common factors that influence sleep are: thirst/feeling of mouth dought, uncomfortable posture, therapeutic tools. Correlation is detected between the quality of sleep in ICU and the severity of the existing disease (p=0.004) and therapeutic tools (p=0.002) and noises (p=0.003). Conclusion: In changed environment, mainly in the ICU, the sleep quality and quantity are poor compared to home’s and standard department’s. ]

Journal of Nursing Theory and Practice

[Factors influencing Lifestyle Changes following Myocardial Infarction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ]

HALÁSZ Henrietta, MEIXNER Istvánné

[The aim of the study: In addition, it seeks those methods which might help in keeping the patients motivated so that they participate in regular health education programs, and in calling their attention to the importance of their own responsibility for their health. Material and Methods: Out of the patients who took part in early rehabilitation after a heart attack, a simple random sample of 127 patients was involved (n=127). The survey was conducted by questionnaire and retrospective data analysis. For the analysis, khi2 test, correlation analysis was performed, where p was considered significant if <0.05. Results: 71% of the patients were over the age of 60, 87% were overweight or obese, 39% were smokers at the beginning of the rehabilitation, 85% suffered from hypertension and 39% had diabetes mellitus. As opposed to male patients, females tend to recognise the impact of lifestyle on health (p=0.004). Patients under the age of 60 were more knowledgeable with regards to medicine than patients above the age of 60 (p=0.000). Positive family anamnesis impacts views on lifestyle changes (p=0.01). Conclusion: In order to increase the effectiveness of health education, different methods are needed when teaching patients above the age of 60. Written materials need to supplement verbal information sharing. Patients with positive family anamnesis have already gained some knowledge, which needs to be corrected or extended as required. Nutrition consulting should be made more practical for better feasibility.]

Journal of Nursing Theory and Practice

[The Importance of Teamwork and Patient Education in the Rehabilitation of Stroke Patients]

HORVÁTH Orsolya, STERLIK Krisztina

[The aim of the study: Stroke is an increasing problem in public health. Every year in Hungary tens of thousands of people survive stroke and continue their life bearing all the negative consequences of this disease. Well organized and early rehabilitation treatment, based on the patients’ clinical condition, improves not only their life expectancy, but also quality of life and helps to restore the self- sufficient living as well. The majority of the stroke patients live with numerous of cerebrovascular risk factors, highlighting the special importance of personalized education to prevent the recurrent stroke. Material and Methods: The aim of our investigation was to examine the efficiency of the neuro-rehabilitation teamwork and personalized patient-education among stroke patients took part inpatient rehabilitation of the Teaching Hospital and Rehabilitation Center of Sopron (2016-2017). We measured the change in ability of self- sufficient living with the FIM scale and the Bartel index, while we analyzed the presence of the modifiable cerebrovascular risk-factors with the assistance of a questionnaire was completed by the patient or the relatives (2016-2017). Results: During our research we also evaluated the knowledge of patients about their condition. According to our results the modifiable risk-factors occured cumulatively among our patients and despite the education that stroke patients received during the acute period in the hospital, there still occured a general lack of knowledge regarding their disease. Conclusions: Based on our results the complex rehabilitation therapy started at its earliest possible following the acute period was the most successful method of treatment. During the acute period, the dissemination of written educational materials and information sheets help the recovery phase until the start of the complex rehabilitation therapy. ]

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[What happens to vertiginous population after emission from the Emergency Department?]

MAIHOUB Stefani, MOLNÁR András, CSIKÓS András, KANIZSAI Péter, TAMÁS László, SZIRMAI Ágnes

[Background – Dizziness is one of the most frequent complaints when a patient is searching for medical care and resolution. This can be a problematic presentation in the emergency department, both from a diagnostic and a management standpoint. Purpose – The aim of our study is to clarify what happens to patients after leaving the emergency department. Methods – 879 patients were examined at the Semmel­weis University Emergency Department with vertigo and dizziness. We sent a questionnaire to these patients and we had 308 completed papers back (110 male, 198 female patients, mean age 61.8 ± 12.31 SD), which we further analyzed. Results – Based on the emergency department diagnosis we had the following results: central vestibular lesion (n = 71), dizziness or giddiness (n = 64) and BPPV (n = 51) were among the most frequent diagnosis. Clarification of the final post-examination diagnosis took several days (28.8%), and weeks (24.2%). It was also noticed that 24.02% of this population never received a proper diagnosis. Among the population only 80 patients (25.8%) got proper diagnosis of their complaints, which was supported by qualitative statistical analysis (Cohen Kappa test) result (κ = 0.560). Discussion – The correlation between our emergency department diagnosis and final diagnosis given to patients is low, a phenomenon that is also observable in other countries. Therefore, patient follow-up is an important issue, including the importance of neurotology and possibly neurological examination. Conclusion – Emergency diagnosis of vertigo is a great challenge, but despite of difficulties the targeted and quick case history and exact examination can evaluate the central or peripheral cause of the balance disorder. Therefore, to prevent declination of the quality of life the importance of further investigation is high.]

Clinical Neuroscience

Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease: A single center experience and systemic analysis of cases in Turkey

USLU Ilgen Ferda, ELIF Gökçal, GÜRSOY Esra Azize, KOLUKISA Mehmet, YILDIZ Babacan Gulsen

We aimed to analyze the clinical, laboratory and neuroimaging findings in patients with sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) in a single center as well as to review other published cases in Turkey. Between January 1st, 2014 and June 31st, 2017, all CJD cases were evaluated based on clinical findings, differential diagnosis, the previous misdiagnosis, electroencephalography (EEG), cerebrospinal fluid and cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in our center. All published cases in Turkey between 2005-2018 were also reviewed. In a total of 13 patients, progressive cognitive decline was the most common presenting symptom. Two patients had a diagnosis of Heidenhain variant, 1 patient had a diagnosis of Oppenheimer-Brownell variant. Seven patients (53.3%) had been misdiagnosed with depression, vascular dementia, normal pressure hydrocephalus or encephalitis. Eleven patients (87%) had typical MRI findings but only 5 of these were present at baseline. Asymmetrical high signal abnormalities on MRI were observed in 4 patients. Five patients (45.4%) had periodic spike wave complexes on EEG, all appeared during the follow-up. There were 74 published cases in Turkey bet­ween 2005 and 2018, with various clinical presentations. CJD has a variety of clinical features in our patient series as well as in cases reported in Turkey. Although progressive cognitive decline is the most common presenting symptom, unusual manifestations in early stages of the disease might cause misdiagnosis. Variant forms should be kept in mind in patients with isolated visual or cerebellar symptoms. MRI and EEG should be repeated during follow-up period if the clinical suspicion still exists.

Clinical Neuroscience

Neuroscience highlights: Main cell types underlying memory and spatial navigation

KRABOTH Zoltán, KÁLMÁN Bernadette

Interest in the hippocampal formation and its role in navigation and memory arose in the second part of the 20th century, at least in part due to the curious case of Henry G. Molaison, who underwent brain surgery for intractable epilepsy. The temporal association observed between the removal of his entorhinal cortex along with a significant part of hippocampus and the developing severe memory deficit inspired scientists to focus on these regions. The subsequent discovery of the so-called place cells in the hippocampus launched the description of many other functional cell types and neuronal networks throughout the Papez-circuit that has a key role in memory processes and spatial information coding (speed, head direction, border, grid, object-vector etc). Each of these cell types has its own unique characteristics, and together they form the so-called “Brain GPS”. The aim of this short survey is to highlight for practicing neurologists the types of cells and neuronal networks that represent the anatomical substrates and physiological correlates of pathological entities affecting the limbic system, especially in the temporal lobe. For that purpose, we survey early discoveries along with the most relevant neuroscience observations from the recent literature. By this brief survey, we highlight main cell types in the hippocampal formation, and describe their roles in spatial navigation and memory processes. In recent decades, an array of new and functionally unique neuron types has been recognized in the hippocampal formation, but likely more remain to be discovered. For a better understanding of the heterogeneous presentations of neurological disorders affecting this anatomical region, insights into the constantly evolving neuroscience behind may be helpful. The public health consequences of diseases that affect memory and spatial navigation are high, and grow as the population ages, prompting scientist to focus on further exploring this brain region.

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Delirium is a syndrome frequently encountered in intensive care and associated with a poor prognosis. Intensive care delirium is mostly based on general and palliative intensive care data in the literature. In this study, we aimed to investigate the incidence of delirium in coronary intensive care unit (CICU), related factors, its relationship with inhospital and follow up prognosis, incidence of age-related delirium and its effect on outcomes. This study was conducted with patients hospitalized in CICU of a tertiary university hospital between 01 August 2017 and 01 August 2018. Files of all patients were examined in details, and demographic, clinic and laboratory parameters were recorded. Patients confirmed with psychiatry consultation were included in the groups of patients who developed delirium. Patients were divided into groups with and without delirium developed, and baseline features, inhospital and follow up prognoses were investigated. In addition, patients were divided into four groups as <65 years old, 65-75 yo, 75-84 yo and> 85 yo, and the incidence of delirium, related factors and prognoses were compared among these groups. A total of 1108 patients (mean age: 64.4 ± 13.9 years; 66% men) who were followed in the intensive care unit with variable indications were included in the study. Of all patients 11.1% developed delirium in the CICU. Patients who developed delirium were older, comorbidities were more frequent, and these patients showed increased inflammation findings, and significant increase in inhospital mortality compared to those who did not develop delirium (p<0.05). At median 9-month follow up period, rehospitalization, reinfarction, cognitive dysfunction, initiation of psychiatric therapy and mortality were significantly higher in the delirium group (p<0.05). When patients who developed delirium were divided into four groups by age and analyzed, incidence of delirium and mortality rate in delirium group were significantly increased by age (p<0.05). Development of delirium in coronary intensive care unit is associated with increased inhospital and follow up morbidity and mortality. Delirium is more commonly seen in geriatric patients and those with comorbidity, and is associated with a poorer prognosis. High-risk patients should be more carefully monitored for the risk of delirium.

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After carpal tunnel surgery, some patients report complaints such as edema, pain, and numbness. Purpose – The aim of this study was to evaluate autonomic nervous system function in patients with a history of carpal tunnel surgery using sympathetic skin response (SSR). Thirty three patients (55 ±10 years old) with a history of unilateral operation for carpal tunnel syndrome were included in the study. The SSR test was performed for both hands. Both upper extremities median and ulnar nerve conduction results were recorded. A reduced amplitude (p=0.006) and delayed latency (p<0.0001) were detected in the SSR test on the operated side compared to contralateral side. There was no correlation between SSR and carpal tunnel syndrome severity. Although complex regional pain syndrome does not develop in patients after carpal tunnel surgery, some of the complaints may be caused by effects on the autonomic nervous system.