Hypertension and nephrology

[The apparatus which controls our kidney too. - Part 1]

ROSIVALL László

SEPTEMBER 21, 2012

Hypertension and nephrology - 2012;16(03-04)

[The series gives a brief overview on the discovery of the juxtaglomerular apparatus (JGA), an interesting story, as well as on details of its structure and function down to the molecular level. The discovery of JGA, i.e., a phylogenetically ancient organ, is a fine example of the close morphological and functional correlations characteristic of living organisms. Presented are the JGA related misconcepts and the underlying theoretical and practical difficulties. Utilization of the most modern methods, such as atomic force microscopy, as well as the in vivo multiphoton laser microscopy revealed previously unrecognized phenomen highlighting the ambiguities of textbook information, accepted paradigms. The author is looking for relationship between the new and provocative theoretical research and clinical consequences of pharmacological interventions. He shows that JGA is not only a participant of the salt-water balance and blood pressure regulation, but it can also play a significant role in the pathogenesis of the major public diseases. Finally, he makes an attempt to analyze the current research directions that predict some potential scientific discoveries and describe some general lessons from his own research career.]

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