Hypertension and nephrology

[Scientific Program]

SEPTEMBER 20, 2012

Hypertension and nephrology - 2012;16(02 klsz)

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Hypertension and nephrology

[Prevalence and care of prediabetic patients in the Hungarian hypertensive population]

KÉKES Ede, KISS István

[Authors studies the incidence of hypertensive patients with prediabetes - according to the IFG criteria - based on the 2005 Hungarian Hypertension registry (38849 subject) and on the „Live under 140/90” sub-program („Prevent it”) (23670 subject) database. The presences of diabetes patients were excluded. IFG incidence (from 5,6 to 7,1 mmol/l) was found between 13-18% of the adult population over 40 years. In men, the incidence was significantly higher. In individuals with IFG the BMI, waist circumference values were significantly higher than the average normal values and exceeded the danger zone. For women significantly higher values were found. These patients had higher total cholesterol and blood pressure values. After three months of intensive supervision, counseling, care over every 40 years age group - without medication - significantly decrease the fasting blood glucose values. They presented the international experiences of prediabetes.]

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[The prevention of eating disorders]

SZUMSKA Irena, TÚRY Ferenc, JAKABFI Péter

[Eating disorders (obesity, anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa) present an increasing public health problem. Research relating to the prevention of these disorders show controversial results. On the basis of some observations prevention programs performed in young populations are effective, other studies present paradoxical effect. The present overview summarises the prevention strategies and discusses a complex program developed in Norway as well as the recommendations of the British Medical Association. In primary prevention reactive and proactive strategies can be distinguished. It is essential that prevention strategies should be realised at a macrosocial level. The real and effective prevention must involve the change in the attitude of the sociocultural environment and the influence of the cultural values mediated by mass media.]