Hypertension and nephrology

[Quality of Life: How Health is Considered. A European Comparison ]

KÉKES Ede, REKETTYE Gábor

OCTOBER 20, 2016

Hypertension and nephrology - 2016;20(05)

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Hypertension and nephrology

[Letter to the Reader]

A szerkesztôség

Hypertension and nephrology

[Hemodynamic approach of the treatment of hypertension. The possible role of impedance cardiography in the tailored antihypertensive therapy]

SIMONYI Gábor, ZSUZSA Pál

[It is important to achieve the blood pressure targets in the course of antihipertensive therapy. It will be beneficial to increase the proportion of patients on blood pressure target to avoid adverse cardiovascular consequences. In hypertension the main definition the elevation of blood pressure alone, but in hypertension are several abnormalities of cardiac output, systemic vascular resistance, stroke volume and arterial compliance too. Impedance cardiography is a simple highly accurate non-invasive device to assess hemodynamic parameters in hypertension. Hemodynamic assessment may help in the treatment of hypertension. Various authors report the improving rate of blood control rate using impedance cardiography which may decrease the risk of target organ damage.]

Hypertension and nephrology

[A new perspective on the extrarenal regulation of sodium and water balance]

AGÓCS Róbert István, SUGÁR Dániel, SULYOK Endre, SZABÓ J. Attila

[The regulation of the homeostasis of sodium and water is one of the oldest fields in medical research. Our article exhibits a new aspect of sodium balance: the concept of the regulated sodium storage taking place in the interstitium of the skin. We summarize the history of the research carried out in this area, beginning with the discovery of osmotically inactive sodium reservoirs to the localization of these buffers and the elucidation of the role of a regulating cutaneous cascade, which has an effect on blood pressure. Glycosaminoglycan (GAG) macromolecules present in the skin interstitium, come into reversible contact with the excess of dietary sodium intake. Thus in addition to the known role of the kidney, the above system may contribute to the regulation of sodium- and water balance and thereby to the regulation of blood pressure.]

Hypertension and nephrology

[Dialysis treatment in Hungary: 2010–2015]

KULCSÁR Imre, ILLÉS Melinda, KOVÁCS LÁSZLÓ

[The authors show the data of Hungarian dialysis statistics from 2010 to 2015. The questionnaire - based data collection was made by Dialysis Registry Committee of the Hungarian Society of Nephrology. The number of all patients entered in the dialysis program increased by 8.4% over six years (an average of 1.4/ per year) and the number of new ones increased by 10.5% (1.75% per year). Between 2003 and 2009 the mean annual increasing of new patients was 7.5%! The incidence of new dialyzed patients was 440/1 million population in 2010 and 486/1 million) in 2015. The population point prevalence at the end of the year was 621/1 million in 2010 and 643/1 million in 2015. The penetrance of peritoneal dialysis was 13.5% in 2010, and 13.6% in 2015. The proportion of incident patients with diabetic or hypertensive nephropathies (conditions which lead to end stage renal disease) was about the same in 2010 (27 and 21%) than in 2016 (27 and 22%). The mean age of incident patients entered into dialysis program decreased from 66.9 years (2010) to 62.8 years (2015), surprisingly. The rate of patients on waiting list for renal transplantation was 10.7% in 2009 and increased to 15,8% in 2015. There is also a significant increase in the number of the annual renal transplantations (268 in 2010 and 356 in 2015). The mortality rate of chronically dialyzed patients shows little decrease (14.4-13.1%).]

Hypertension and nephrology

[Changes to the Prevalence, Diagnosis, Treatment and Effective Control Frequency of Hypertension in Turkey between 2003 and 2012: Studies PatenT and PatenT2]

VÁRALLYAY Zoltán

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[A growing body of evidence suggests that sleep plays an essential role in the consolidation of different memory systems, but less is known about the beneficial effect of sleep on relational memory processes and the recognition of emotional facial expressions, however, it is a fundamental cognitive skill in human everyday life. Thus, the study aims to investigate the effect of timing of learning and the role of sleep in relational memory processes. 84 young adults (average age: 22.36 (SD: 3.22), 21 male/63 female) participated in our study, divided into two groups: evening group and morning group indicating the time of learning. We used the face-name task to measure relational memory and facial expression recognition. There were two sessions for both groups: the immediate testing phase and the delayed retesting phase, separated by 24 hours. 84 young adults (average age: 22.36 (SD: 3.22), 21 male/63 female) participated in our study, divided into two groups: evening group and morning group indicating the time of learning. We used the face-name task to measure relational memory and facial expression recognition. There were two sessions for both groups: the immediate testing phase and the delayed retesting phase, separated by 24 hours. Our results suggest that the timing of learning and sleep plays an important role in the stabilizing process of memory representation to resist against forgetting.]

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[The well-known gap bet­ween stroke mortality of Eastern and Western Euro­pean countries may reflect the effect of socioeconomic diffe­rences. Such a gap may be present between neighborhoods of different wealth within one city. We set forth to compare age distribution, incidence, case fatality, mortality, and risk factor profile of stroke patients of the poorest (District 8) and wealthiest (District 12) districts of Budapest. We synthesize the results of our former comparative epidemiological investigations focusing on the association of socioeconomic background and features of stroke in two districts of the capital city of Hungary. The “Budapest District 8–12 project” pointed out the younger age of stroke patients of the poorer district, and established that the prevalence of smoking, alcohol-consumption, and untreated hypertension is also higher in District 8. The “Six Years in Two Districts” project involving 4779 patients with a 10-year follow-up revealed higher incidence, case fatality and mortality of stroke in the less wealthy district. The younger patients of the poorer region show higher risk-factor prevalence, die younger and their fatality grows faster during long-term follow-up. The higher prevalence of risk factors and the higher fatality of the younger age groups in the socioeconomically deprived district reflect the higher vulnerability of the population in District 8. The missing link between poverty and stroke outcome seems to be lifestyle risk-factors and lack of adherence to primary preventive efforts. Public health campaigns on stroke prevention should focus on the young generation of socioeconomi­cally deprived neighborhoods. ]

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Comparison of direct costs of percutaneous full-endoscopic interlaminar lumbar discectomy and microdiscectomy: Results from Turkey

ÜNSAL Ünlü Ülkün, ŞENTÜRK Salim

Microdiscectomy (MD) is a stan­dard technique for the surgical treatment of lumbar disc herniation (LDH). Uniportal percutaneous full-endoscopic in­terlaminar lumbar discectomy (PELD) is another surgical op­tion that has become popular owing to reports of shorter hos­pitalization and earlier functional recovery. There are very few articles analyzing the total costs of these two techniques. The purpose of this study was to compare total hospital costs among microdiscectomy (MD) and uniportal percutaneous full-endoscopic interlaminar lumbar discectomy (PELD). Forty patients aged between 22-70 years who underwent PELD or MD with different anesthesia techniques were divided into four groups: (i) PELD-local anesthesia (PELD-Local) (n=10), (ii) PELD-general anesthesia (PELD-General) (n=10), (iii) MD-spinal anesthesia (MD-Spinal) (n=10), (iv) MD-general anesthesia (MD-General) (n=10). Health care costs were defined as the sum of direct costs. Data were then analyzed based on anesthetic modality to produce a direct cost evaluation. Direct costs were compared statistically between MD and PELD groups. The sum of total costs was $1,249.50 in the PELD-Local group, $1,741.50 in the PELD-General group, $2,015.60 in the MD-Spinal group, and $2,348.70 in the MD-General group. The sum of total costs was higher in the MD-Spinal and MD-General groups than in the PELD-Local and PELD-General groups. The costs of surgical operation, surgical equipment, anesthesia (anesthetist’s costs), hospital stay, anesthetic drugs and materials, laboratory wor­kup, nur­sing care, and postoperative me­dication diffe­red significantly among the two main groups (PELD-MD) (p<0.01). This study demonstrated that PELD is less costly than MD.

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[What happens to vertiginous population after emission from the Emergency Department?]

MAIHOUB Stefani, MOLNÁR András, CSIKÓS András, KANIZSAI Péter, TAMÁS László, SZIRMAI Ágnes

[Background – Dizziness is one of the most frequent complaints when a patient is searching for medical care and resolution. This can be a problematic presentation in the emergency department, both from a diagnostic and a management standpoint. Purpose – The aim of our study is to clarify what happens to patients after leaving the emergency department. Methods – 879 patients were examined at the Semmel­weis University Emergency Department with vertigo and dizziness. We sent a questionnaire to these patients and we had 308 completed papers back (110 male, 198 female patients, mean age 61.8 ± 12.31 SD), which we further analyzed. Results – Based on the emergency department diagnosis we had the following results: central vestibular lesion (n = 71), dizziness or giddiness (n = 64) and BPPV (n = 51) were among the most frequent diagnosis. Clarification of the final post-examination diagnosis took several days (28.8%), and weeks (24.2%). It was also noticed that 24.02% of this population never received a proper diagnosis. Among the population only 80 patients (25.8%) got proper diagnosis of their complaints, which was supported by qualitative statistical analysis (Cohen Kappa test) result (κ = 0.560). Discussion – The correlation between our emergency department diagnosis and final diagnosis given to patients is low, a phenomenon that is also observable in other countries. Therefore, patient follow-up is an important issue, including the importance of neurotology and possibly neurological examination. Conclusion – Emergency diagnosis of vertigo is a great challenge, but despite of difficulties the targeted and quick case history and exact examination can evaluate the central or peripheral cause of the balance disorder. Therefore, to prevent declination of the quality of life the importance of further investigation is high.]