Hypertension and nephrology

[Position Paper on the Prevention of the Renal Harmful Effects of Contrast Agents]

HARIS Ágnes, NAGY Judit, MÁTYUS János

SEPTEMBER 21, 2012

Hypertension and nephrology - 2012;16(03-04)

COMMENTS

0 comments

Further articles in this publication

Hypertension and nephrology

[The apparatus which controls our kidney too. - Part 1]

ROSIVALL László

[The series gives a brief overview on the discovery of the juxtaglomerular apparatus (JGA), an interesting story, as well as on details of its structure and function down to the molecular level. The discovery of JGA, i.e., a phylogenetically ancient organ, is a fine example of the close morphological and functional correlations characteristic of living organisms. Presented are the JGA related misconcepts and the underlying theoretical and practical difficulties. Utilization of the most modern methods, such as atomic force microscopy, as well as the in vivo multiphoton laser microscopy revealed previously unrecognized phenomen highlighting the ambiguities of textbook information, accepted paradigms. The author is looking for relationship between the new and provocative theoretical research and clinical consequences of pharmacological interventions. He shows that JGA is not only a participant of the salt-water balance and blood pressure regulation, but it can also play a significant role in the pathogenesis of the major public diseases. Finally, he makes an attempt to analyze the current research directions that predict some potential scientific discoveries and describe some general lessons from his own research career.]

Hypertension and nephrology

[Measuring Vessel Wall Flexibility in Healthy and in Renal Transplant Children – Determining Childhood Normal Values for the Pulse Wave Spread Velocity]

CSEPREKÁL Orsolya

Hypertension and nephrology

[Is there a role of triple combination in the therapy of hypertension? - Antihypertensive efficiency of perindopril-amlodipine-indapamide]

PÁLL Dénes, SZÁNTÓ Ildikó, PARAGH György, KATONA Éva

[Blood pressure reduction to target level decreases cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. However, in the vast majority of cases, this can be achieved only with a (multiple) combination regimen. The primary objective of the PAINT (Perindopril- Amlodipine plus Indapamide Combination for Controlled Hypertension Non-intervention Trial) study was to evaluate the efficacy of combination therapy with perindopril, amlodipine, and indapamide in patients who had not reached target blood pressure with their pre-existing therapy. Secondary objectives included the monitoring of metabolic parameters and the number of antihypertensive tablets taken by the subjects. In this subgroup-analysis we involved 126 patients (74 females and 52 males, mean age 59.8±12.5 years) who had a valid 24-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring both at baseline and at the end of the 4-months follow-up. At the beginning of the study none of the subjects reached blood pressure target despite taking on average 2.4±1.4 antihypertensive drugs. During the study, the subjects received the combination of amlodipine, perindopril, and indapamide instead of their pre-existing antihypertensive regimen. 24-hour mean systolic blood pressure decreased from 139.2±13.4 mmHg to 126.5±12.9 mmHg (p<0.01), as well as mean diastolic blood pressure from 77.3±11.3 mmHg to 71.1±8.7 mmHg (p<0.01). Heart rate remained unchanged. Blood pressure reduction was statistically significant both during the day and the night. We found significant blood pressure reduction in all hours (10.1-15.4/5.1-7.8 mmHg; p<0.001). Hyperbaric impact decreased from 366.9±251.1 mmHg × hour to 166.2±185.4 mmHg × hour (p<0.01) for systolic blood pressure, and from 112±130.6 mmHg × hour to 41.6±65.6 mmHg × hour (p<0.01) for diastolic blood pressure. We also could observe favourable changes in metabolic parameters, not only in lipids, but also in blood sugar level. The mean number of tablets taken by the subjects increased from 2.4 to 2.9, but this led to a significantly improved control of blood pressure. Triple combinations of state-of-the-art antihypertensive agents - such as of perindopril, amlodipine and indapamide - ensure effective blood pressure control in sufficiently compliant patients.]

Hypertension and nephrology

[Past, Present and Future – Message of the Macedonian Nephrology ]

ROSIVALL László

Hypertension and nephrology

[The prognostic role of serum albumin levels in survival of chronically hemodialized patients]

KULCSÁR Imre, SZAKÁCS Gyuláné, SZEGEDI János, KISS István

[The authors have investigated the survival of 238 patients on chronic haemodialysis program regarding serum albumin levels (measured at starting dialysis and at the end of observation) adjusted for age, gender, diabetes, serum haemoglobin and body weight. The mean observational period was 5.5 years. Our investigation has documented a tight positive correlation between the survival and serum albumin levels both at starting and ending of investigation independently of epidemiological parameters. It was demonstrated that serum albumin levels decrease by aging, so the authors recommend a little bit lower serum albumin target level for older dialyzed people, because the normal range is also decreasing by aging. The level of serum albumin has not shown changing in younger patients (less than 60 years) in this long observational period, but there was a significant decrease in olders (especially above 70 years).]

All articles in the issue

Related contents

Clinical Neuroscience

The etiology and age-related properties of patients with delirium in coronary intensive care unit and its effects on inhospital and follow up prognosis

ALTAY Servet, GÜRDOGAN Muhammet, KAYA Caglar, KARDAS Fatih, ZEYBEY Utku, CAKIR Burcu, EBIK Mustafa, DEMIR Melik

Delirium is a syndrome frequently encountered in intensive care and associated with a poor prognosis. Intensive care delirium is mostly based on general and palliative intensive care data in the literature. In this study, we aimed to investigate the incidence of delirium in coronary intensive care unit (CICU), related factors, its relationship with inhospital and follow up prognosis, incidence of age-related delirium and its effect on outcomes. This study was conducted with patients hospitalized in CICU of a tertiary university hospital between 01 August 2017 and 01 August 2018. Files of all patients were examined in details, and demographic, clinic and laboratory parameters were recorded. Patients confirmed with psychiatry consultation were included in the groups of patients who developed delirium. Patients were divided into groups with and without delirium developed, and baseline features, inhospital and follow up prognoses were investigated. In addition, patients were divided into four groups as <65 years old, 65-75 yo, 75-84 yo and> 85 yo, and the incidence of delirium, related factors and prognoses were compared among these groups. A total of 1108 patients (mean age: 64.4 ± 13.9 years; 66% men) who were followed in the intensive care unit with variable indications were included in the study. Of all patients 11.1% developed delirium in the CICU. Patients who developed delirium were older, comorbidities were more frequent, and these patients showed increased inflammation findings, and significant increase in inhospital mortality compared to those who did not develop delirium (p<0.05). At median 9-month follow up period, rehospitalization, reinfarction, cognitive dysfunction, initiation of psychiatric therapy and mortality were significantly higher in the delirium group (p<0.05). When patients who developed delirium were divided into four groups by age and analyzed, incidence of delirium and mortality rate in delirium group were significantly increased by age (p<0.05). Development of delirium in coronary intensive care unit is associated with increased inhospital and follow up morbidity and mortality. Delirium is more commonly seen in geriatric patients and those with comorbidity, and is associated with a poorer prognosis. High-risk patients should be more carefully monitored for the risk of delirium.

Clinical Neuroscience

Simultaneous subdural, subarachnoideal and intracerebral haemorrhage after rupture of a peripheral middle cerebral artery aneurysm

BÉRES-MOLNÁR Anna Katalin, FOLYOVICH András, SZLOBODA Péter, SZENDREY-KISS Zsolt, BERECZKI Dániel, BAKOS Mária, VÁRALLYAY György, SZABÓ Huba, NYÁRI István

The cause of intracerebral, subarachnoid and subdural haemorrhage is different, and the simultaneous appearance in the same case is extremely rare. We describe the case of a patient with a ruptured aneurysm on the distal segment of the middle cerebral artery, with a concomitant subdural and intracerebral haemorrhage, and a subsequent secondary brainstem (Duret) haemorrhage. The 59-year-old woman had hypertension and diabetes in her medical history. She experienced anomic aphasia and left-sided headache starting one day before admission. She had no trauma. A few minutes after admission she suddenly became comatose, her breathing became superficial. Non-contrast CT revealed left sided fronto-parietal subdural and subarachnoid and intracerebral haemorrhage, and bleeding was also observed in the right pontine region. The patient had leucocytosis and hyperglycemia but normal hemostasis. After the subdural haemorrhage had been evacuated, the patient was transferred to intensive care unit. Sepsis developed. Echocardiography did not detect endocarditis. Neurological status, vigilance gradually improved. The rehabilitation process was interrupted by epileptic status. Control CT and CT angiography proved an aneurysm in the peripheral part of the left middle cerebral artery, which was later clipped. Histolo­gical examination excluded mycotic etiology of the aneu­rysm and “normal aneurysm wall” was described. The brain stem haemorrhage – Duret bleeding – was presumably caused by a sudden increase in intracranial pressure due to the supratentorial space occupying process and consequential trans-tentorial herniation. This case is a rarity, as the patient not only survived, but lives an active life with some residual symptoms.

Clinical Neuroscience

Autonomic nervous system may be affected after carpal tunnel syndrome surgery: A possible mechanism for persistence of symptoms after surgery

ONDER Burcu, KELES Yavuz Betul

After carpal tunnel surgery, some patients report complaints such as edema, pain, and numbness. Purpose – The aim of this study was to evaluate autonomic nervous system function in patients with a history of carpal tunnel surgery using sympathetic skin response (SSR). Thirty three patients (55 ±10 years old) with a history of unilateral operation for carpal tunnel syndrome were included in the study. The SSR test was performed for both hands. Both upper extremities median and ulnar nerve conduction results were recorded. A reduced amplitude (p=0.006) and delayed latency (p<0.0001) were detected in the SSR test on the operated side compared to contralateral side. There was no correlation between SSR and carpal tunnel syndrome severity. Although complex regional pain syndrome does not develop in patients after carpal tunnel surgery, some of the complaints may be caused by effects on the autonomic nervous system.

Hypertension and nephrology

[Polycystic kidney]

DOLGOS Szilveszter, TÁRNOKI Ádám Domonkos, TÁRNOKI Dávid László

[The most common monogenic nephropathy is a congenital, cystic, bulky process in the kidney that leads to a gradual deterioration in renal function. Renal failure is often associated with cystic liver or pancreatic lesions, cerebral artery aneurysm, or mitral prolapse.]

Clinical Neuroscience

Evaluation of anxiety, depression and marital relationships in patients with migraine

DEMIR Fıgen Ulku, BOZKURT Oya

Aim - The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency and characteristics of attacks in patients with migraine, to determine the effects of anxiety or depressive symptoms, and to evaluate the marital relationships of patients with migraine. Method - Thirty patients who were admitted to the neurology outpatient clinic of our hospital between July 2018 and October 2018 and were diagnosed with migraine according to the 2013 International Headache Society (IHS) diagnostic criteria were included in this cross-sectional study. Age, sex, headache frequency and severity, depressive traits, marital satisfaction and anxiety status were examined. We used the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), Maudsley Marital Questionnaire (MMQ) and Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) for measuring relevant parameters. Results - The mean severity of migraine pain according to VAS scale was 6.93 ± 1.41 and the mean number of migraine attacks was 4.50 ± 4.24. The mean BDI score of the patients was 12.66 ± 8.98, the mean MMQ-M score was 19.80 ± 12.52, the mean MMQ-S score was 13.20 ± 9.53, the mean STAI-state score was 39.93 ± 10.87 and the mean STAI-trait score was 45.73 ± 8.96. No significant correlation was found between age, number of migraine attacks, migraine duration, migraine headache intensity, and BDI, STAI and MMQ scores (p>0.05). But there was a positive correlation between MMQ-S and scores obtained from the BDI and STAI-state scales (p<0.05). Conclusion - In this study more than half of the migraine patients had mild, moderate or severe depression. A positive correlation was found between sexual dissatisfaction and scale scores of depression and anxiety.