Hypertension and nephrology

[Position Paper Concerning the Use of Angiotensin Converting Enzyme Inhibitors and Angiotensin Receptor Blockers (Inhibition of the Renin-Angiotensin System) in Chronic Renal Disease]

MÁTYUS János, KISS István

MAY 20, 2012

Hypertension and nephrology - 2012;16(02)

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Hypertension and nephrology

[Gender differencies in coronary reactivity in angiotensin II hypertension rat model]

MÁTRAI Máté, NÁDASY György L, HETHÉSSY Judit, SZEKERES Mária, Monos Emil, SZÉKÁCS Béla, VÁRBÍRÓ Szabolcs

[It is known that hypertension shows several gender specific elements both in pathogenesis and in therapy. Understanding this phenomenon may bring us closer to individualized therapy. That was the reason why we examined process of hypertensive adaptation on the level of small intramural coronary arteries. 10-10 male and female Sprague-Dawley rats were used in this study. Animals received osmotic pumps in anaesthesia, which emitted 100 ng/bwkg/min angiotensin II acetate for four weeks. After four weeks treatment, animals were sacrified and heart weights were measured. We isolated intramural, small branches of the left anterior descendant coronary artery, placed them into vessel chamber and tested biomechanical properties and pharmacological reactivity. Heart weight and wall thickness were higher in females comparing to males. However, basal vascular tone and thromboxane-mediated vasoconstriction were elevated in males. Bradykinin relaxation was bigger in females. In female animals inward eutrophic remodeling was found, while in males increased wall stress and elastic moduli dominated the adaptation process. In conclusion, initial steps of angiotensin II mediated hypertension induced markedly gender dependent alterations.]

Hypertension and nephrology

[Sándor Gerő, the researcher clinician (1904-1992)]

GÁCS János

[Sándor Gerő presents two theories concerning the origin of atherosclerosis. The first one is called “primary lipid infiltration concept” which means the penetration of high concentration plasma lipids into the arterial wall without its damage. The other theory for the origin of atherosclerosis is primary damage of the vascular wall (namely of fibers, mucopolysaccharid etc.) which is followed by lipid infiltration. In the literature it is named “primary vascular concept” of atherosclerosis. The author investigates the two possibilities with experimental and clinical methods and concludes that primary vascular damage is more probable to be the origin of atherosclerosis.]

Hypertension and nephrology

[Report on the 49th ERA-EDTA Congress]

Hypertension and nephrology

[Congress Report – The 17th Debrecen Nephrology Days, 30 May – 2 June 2012]

Hypertension and nephrology

[Sleep disorders and quality of life in patients after kidney transplantation]

TURÁNYI Csilla Zita, ZALAI Dóra, MOLNÁR Miklós Zsolt, NOVÁK Márta, MUCSI István

[Kidney transplantation provides the best outcomes, concerning morbidity, mortality and health related quality of life for patients with end stage renal disease. Health related quality of life is increasingly recognized as an important outcome measure in patients with different chronic medical conditions, including chronic kidney disease. Sleep disorders, such as insomnia, sleep apnea syndrome and restless legs syndrome are common in patients with chronic kidney disease. The prevalence of insomnia and restless legs syndrome is similar in kidney transplanted patients to the prevalence observed in the general population. On the other hand, the prevalence of sleep apnea is considerably higher, about 30%. The association between sleep disorders and impaired health related quality of life has been relatively well documented in dialysis patients but only scarce information has been published about the kidney transplanted population. In this paper we summarize published data about sleep disorders and also about their association with health related quality of life in the kidney transplanted population.]

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Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease: A single center experience and systemic analysis of cases in Turkey

USLU Ilgen Ferda, ELIF Gökçal, GÜRSOY Esra Azize, KOLUKISA Mehmet, YILDIZ Babacan Gulsen

We aimed to analyze the clinical, laboratory and neuroimaging findings in patients with sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) in a single center as well as to review other published cases in Turkey. Between January 1st, 2014 and June 31st, 2017, all CJD cases were evaluated based on clinical findings, differential diagnosis, the previous misdiagnosis, electroencephalography (EEG), cerebrospinal fluid and cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings in our center. All published cases in Turkey between 2005-2018 were also reviewed. In a total of 13 patients, progressive cognitive decline was the most common presenting symptom. Two patients had a diagnosis of Heidenhain variant, 1 patient had a diagnosis of Oppenheimer-Brownell variant. Seven patients (53.3%) had been misdiagnosed with depression, vascular dementia, normal pressure hydrocephalus or encephalitis. Eleven patients (87%) had typical MRI findings but only 5 of these were present at baseline. Asymmetrical high signal abnormalities on MRI were observed in 4 patients. Five patients (45.4%) had periodic spike wave complexes on EEG, all appeared during the follow-up. There were 74 published cases in Turkey bet­ween 2005 and 2018, with various clinical presentations. CJD has a variety of clinical features in our patient series as well as in cases reported in Turkey. Although progressive cognitive decline is the most common presenting symptom, unusual manifestations in early stages of the disease might cause misdiagnosis. Variant forms should be kept in mind in patients with isolated visual or cerebellar symptoms. MRI and EEG should be repeated during follow-up period if the clinical suspicion still exists.

Clinical Neuroscience

The etiology and age-related properties of patients with delirium in coronary intensive care unit and its effects on inhospital and follow up prognosis

ALTAY Servet, GÜRDOGAN Muhammet, KAYA Caglar, KARDAS Fatih, ZEYBEY Utku, CAKIR Burcu, EBIK Mustafa, DEMIR Melik

Delirium is a syndrome frequently encountered in intensive care and associated with a poor prognosis. Intensive care delirium is mostly based on general and palliative intensive care data in the literature. In this study, we aimed to investigate the incidence of delirium in coronary intensive care unit (CICU), related factors, its relationship with inhospital and follow up prognosis, incidence of age-related delirium and its effect on outcomes. This study was conducted with patients hospitalized in CICU of a tertiary university hospital between 01 August 2017 and 01 August 2018. Files of all patients were examined in details, and demographic, clinic and laboratory parameters were recorded. Patients confirmed with psychiatry consultation were included in the groups of patients who developed delirium. Patients were divided into groups with and without delirium developed, and baseline features, inhospital and follow up prognoses were investigated. In addition, patients were divided into four groups as <65 years old, 65-75 yo, 75-84 yo and> 85 yo, and the incidence of delirium, related factors and prognoses were compared among these groups. A total of 1108 patients (mean age: 64.4 ± 13.9 years; 66% men) who were followed in the intensive care unit with variable indications were included in the study. Of all patients 11.1% developed delirium in the CICU. Patients who developed delirium were older, comorbidities were more frequent, and these patients showed increased inflammation findings, and significant increase in inhospital mortality compared to those who did not develop delirium (p<0.05). At median 9-month follow up period, rehospitalization, reinfarction, cognitive dysfunction, initiation of psychiatric therapy and mortality were significantly higher in the delirium group (p<0.05). When patients who developed delirium were divided into four groups by age and analyzed, incidence of delirium and mortality rate in delirium group were significantly increased by age (p<0.05). Development of delirium in coronary intensive care unit is associated with increased inhospital and follow up morbidity and mortality. Delirium is more commonly seen in geriatric patients and those with comorbidity, and is associated with a poorer prognosis. High-risk patients should be more carefully monitored for the risk of delirium.

Clinical Neuroscience

[Zonisamide: one of the first-line antiepileptic drugs in focal epilepsy ]

JANSZKY József, HORVÁTH Réka, KOMOLY Sámuel

[Chronic administration of antiepileptic drugs without history of unprovoked epileptic seizures are not recommended for epilepsy prophylaxis. Conversely, if the patient suffered the first unprovoked seizure, then the presence of epileptiform discharges on the EEG, focal neurological signs, and the presence of epileptogenic lesion on the MRI are risk factors for a second seizure (such as for the development of epilepsy). Without these risk factors, the chance of a second seizure is about 25-30%, while the presence of these risk factors (for example signs of previous stroke, neurotrauma, or encephalitis on the MRI) can predict >70% seizure recurrence. Thus the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) re-defined the term ’epilepsy’ which can be diagnosed even after the first seizure, if the risk of seizure recurrence is high. According to this definition, we can start antiepileptic drug therapy after a single unprovoked seizure. There are four antiepileptic drugs which has the highest evidence (level „A”) as first-line initial monotherapy for treating newly diagnosed epilepsy. These are: carbamazepine, phenytoin, levetiracetam, and zonisamide (ZNS). The present review focuses on the ZNS. Beacuse ZNS can be administrated once a day, it is an optimal drug for maintaining patient’s compliance and for those patients who have a high risk for developing a non-compliance (for example teenagers and young adults). Due to the low interaction potential, ZNS treatment is safe and effective in treating epilepsy of elderly people. ZNS is an ideal drug in epilepsy accompanied by obesity, because ZNS has a weight loss effect, especially in obese patients.]

Hypertension and nephrology

[Polycystic kidney]

DOLGOS Szilveszter, TÁRNOKI Ádám Domonkos, TÁRNOKI Dávid László

[The most common monogenic nephropathy is a congenital, cystic, bulky process in the kidney that leads to a gradual deterioration in renal function. Renal failure is often associated with cystic liver or pancreatic lesions, cerebral artery aneurysm, or mitral prolapse.]

Clinical Neuroscience

Autonomic nervous system may be affected after carpal tunnel syndrome surgery: A possible mechanism for persistence of symptoms after surgery

ONDER Burcu, KELES Yavuz Betul

After carpal tunnel surgery, some patients report complaints such as edema, pain, and numbness. Purpose – The aim of this study was to evaluate autonomic nervous system function in patients with a history of carpal tunnel surgery using sympathetic skin response (SSR). Thirty three patients (55 ±10 years old) with a history of unilateral operation for carpal tunnel syndrome were included in the study. The SSR test was performed for both hands. Both upper extremities median and ulnar nerve conduction results were recorded. A reduced amplitude (p=0.006) and delayed latency (p<0.0001) were detected in the SSR test on the operated side compared to contralateral side. There was no correlation between SSR and carpal tunnel syndrome severity. Although complex regional pain syndrome does not develop in patients after carpal tunnel surgery, some of the complaints may be caused by effects on the autonomic nervous system.