Hypertension and nephrology

[New results on the pathomechanism of antibody-mediated renal allograft rejection]

MEZÔ Blanka, ANDREAS Heilos, RUSAI Krisztina, PROHÁSZKA Zoltán

OCTOBER 20, 2017

Hypertension and nephrology - 2017;21(05)

[Antibody mediated rejection (ABMR) is a severe clinical problem which is the major immunological cause of kidney transplant failure and may develop slowly months or years after transplantation. According to current knowledge, late ABMR is classically caused by the development of donor specific antibodies (DSA) and the complement system is believed to contribute to tissue damage. The detection of ABMR has been facilitated by improved techniques and new test, resulting in changes of the diagnostic criteria from time to time. The clinical interpretation of DSAs is still not clear however the complement binding ability could help to judge their relevance. In this review we discuss the new results on the pathomechanism and current diagnostic guideline of ABMR. Identification and treatment of ABMR before onset of clinical symptoms is still a big challenge but may lead to a significantly better outcome. In our study we are investigating the role of the complement system including quantitative and genetic testing of several complement proteins that can serve as a diagnostic/prognostic marker of the disease.]

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