Hypertension and nephrology

[Hypertension and pregnancy]

JÁRAI Zoltán, VÁRBÍRÓ Szabolcs

SEPTEMBER 10, 2019

Hypertension and nephrology - 2019;23(04)

DOI: https://doi.org/10.33668/hn.23.020

[Hypertension complicates approximately 10% of the pregnancies and with this high blood pressure is the most frequent cardiovascular comorbidity during pregnancy. Hypertension during pregnancy accounts for a substantial maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality risk. In our review we focus on the forms, diagnosis and therapeutic possibilities of gestational hypertension according to the European and domestic guidelines.]

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