Hypertension and nephrology

[How can we improve the chronic renal patient care?]

KULCSÁR Imre

APRIL 08, 2017

Hypertension and nephrology - 2017;21(02)

[The author summarizes on the base of forty year’s experience in the field of Hungarian nephrological care, that which are the main developmental problems and possibilities in the clinical nephrology and in dialysis therapy in Hungary recently. There is a clear claim to change in the training of nephrological nurses and nephrologists, and it is very important the organized education of predialysis patients, improving capacity of outpatient nephrological care in his opinion. He recommends organizing the total nephrological care in every county (except nephropathology and renal transplantation) and changing the relevant health law. He emphasizes the importance of conservative care in chronic kidney diseases and home renal replacement therapies. Highly educated nurses must play much more important role in care of dialyzed patients (with more competencies). It is very important planned start in dialysis, and instead of uniform regimes, the therapy provided individually. He suggests measuring of the health-related quality of life regularly and the survival of patients on renal replacement therapy, also. It would be important to determine the residual renal function in dialysis program, monthly. He is considering the phenomenon of “recovery of renal function” and the problem of withdrawal of dialysis.]

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