Hungarian Radiology

[Giant colonic diverticulum]

SARLÓS Géza, GARAMSZEGI Mária, GREXA Erzsébet

DECEMBER 20, 2007

Hungarian Radiology - 2007;81(07-08)

[INTRODUCTION - Very rarely do colonic diverticula grow enourmously - from 3-4 cm upto 15-20 cm in diameter - causing diagnostic difficulties. PATIENT AND METHODS - The authors present a case of an elderly male patient where the ultrasound examination accidentally revealed irregularity in a part of the sigmoid colon with thickened wall. This finding was then examined by colonoscopy, colonography (double contrast barium enema) and CT. Two giant diverticula, measuring 4-5 cm in diameter, arising from the sigmoid colon were demonstrated. Considering the old age of the patient and the lack of clinical symptoms, the affected part of the sigmoid colon had not been surgically resected. CONCLUSION - Giving a general overview on the pathogenesis, presentation and differential diagnosis of colonic diverticula, the authors emphasise the importance of colonography. Also, as far as the authors know, this is the first Hungarian report on giant colonic diverticulum.]

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