Clinical Neuroscience

[Validation of the Hungarian MDS-UPDRS: Why do we need a new Parkinson scale?]

HORVÁTH Krisztina1, ASCHERMANN Zsuzsanna2, ÁCS Péter2, BOSNYÁK Edit2, DELI Gabriella2, PÁL Endre2, KÉSMÁRKI Ildikó3, HORVÁTH A. Réka2, TAKÁCS Katalin2, KOMOLY Sámuel2, BOKOR Magdolna4, RIGÓ Eszter4, LAJTOS Júlia5, KLIVÉNYI Péter6, DIBÓ György6, VÉCSEI László6,7, TAKÁTS Annamária8, TÓTH Adrián8, IMRE Piroska9, NAGY Ferenc10, HERCEG Mihály10, HIDASI Eszter11, KOVÁCS Norbert2,12

MARCH 30, 2014

Clinical Neuroscience - 2014;67(03-04)

[Background - The Movement Disorder Society-sponsored revision of the Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale (MDS-UPDRS) has been published in 2008 as the successor of the original UPDRS. The MDS-UPDRS organizing team developed guidelines for the development of official non- English translations consisting of four steps: translation/back-translation, cognitive pretesting, large field testing, and clinimetric analysis. The aim of this paper was to introduce the new MDS-UPDRS and its validation process into Hungarian. Methods - Two independent groups of neurologists translated the text of the MDS-UPDRS into Hungarian and subsequently back-translated into English. After the review of the back-translated English version by the MDS-UPDRS translation administration team, cognitive pretesting was conducted with ten patients. Based on the results of the initial cognitive pretesting, another round was conducted. For the large field testing phase, the Hungarian official working draft version of MDS-UPDRS was tested with 357 patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD). Confirmatory factor analyses (CFA) determined whether the factor structure for the English-language MDS-UPDRS could be confirmed in data collected using the Hungarian Official Draft Version. To become an official translation, the Comparative Fit Index (CFI) had to be ≥0.90 compared to the English-language version. Results - For all four parts of the Hungarian MDS-UPDRS, the CFI was ≥0.94. Conclusion - The overall factor structure of the Hungarian version was consistent with that of the English version based on the high CFIs for all the four parts of the MDSUPDRS in the CFA; therefore, this version was designated as the ‘OFFICIAL HUNGARIAN VERSION OF THE MDSUPDRS.’]

AFFILIATIONS

  1. Pécsi Tudományegyetem, Klinikai Idegtudományok Doktori Iskola, Pécs
  2. Pécsi Tudományegyetem, Neurológiai Klinika, Pécs
  3. Egyesített Egészségügyi Intézmények, Neurológia Szakrendelés, Pécs
  4. Nyírô Gyula Kórház-OPAI, Neurológiai Osztály, Budapest
  5. Kenézy Gyula Kórház, Neurológiai Osztály, Debrecen
  6. Szegedi Tudományegyetem, Neurológiai Klinika, Szeged
  7. MTA-SZTE, Idegtudományi Kutatócsoport, Szeged
  8. Semmelweis Egyetem, Neurológiai Klinika, Budapest
  9. Csolnoky Ferenc Kórház, Neurológiai Osztály, Veszprém
  10. Kaposi Mór Megyei Kórház, Neurológiai Osztály, Kaposvár
  11. Debreceni Egyetem, Neurológiai Klinika, Debrecen
  12. MTA-PTE, Klinikai Idegtudományi Képalkotó Kutatócsoport, Pécs

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