Clinical Neuroscience

[Treatment of wide necked intracranial aneursyms in staged procedure with stent implantation and coils]

MÓZES Péter, LÁZÁR István, SOLYMOSI László

JULY 20, 2011

Clinical Neuroscience - 2011;64(07-08)

[Since the introduction of electrolytically detachable coils the endovascular treatment of intracranial aneurysms is dynamically developing. The good results with this technique led to a progressive expansion of the indications. For the treatment of complex, wide-necked and fusiform aneurysms several new devices and techniques were developed. The introduction of a new device is possible after a feasibility study. In these studies the number of cases is low. Some risk factors or possible complications occur only after the introduction of a new device to the market.]

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Clinical Neuroscience

[Recent changes in the paradigm of limbic encephalitis]

ILLÉS Zsolt

[In the recent years, novel antibodies associated with limbic encephalitis have been described, which target such extracellular receptors or proteins that have been already indicated in the pathogenesis of hereditary or degenerative diseases. In a number of cases, where pathogenic role of antibodies generated against the voltage-gated potassium channel (VGKC) had been presumed, antibodies against a trans-synaptic scaffolding protein, LGI1 were indicated. Antibody response against NMDA-receptors has been suggested as a major cause of limbic encephalitis especially in young females, resulting in a typical clinical syndrome sometimes triggered by an ovarian teratoma. Antibodies against other receptors essential in synaptic transmission and plasticity (AMPA and GABAB receptors) have been also indicated, partially elicited by paraneoplastic processes. Such antibodies against surface proteins result in severe but potentially treatable diseases due to reversible internalization of the antigens crosslinked by the bivalent antibodies. In contrast, the rare classical onconeural antibodies reacting with intracellular targets (anti-Hu, anti-Ta/Ma2, anti- CV2/CRMP5) may elicit additional symptoms beside limbic encephalitis and the prognosis of such syndromes is poor.]

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Clinical Neuroscience

[Modeling of human movements, neuroprostheses]

LACZKÓ József

[Modeling of human movements became very important as modern methods in informatics and engeniering are available to discern human movement characteristics that were hidden before. The construction of models of neural control and mechanical execution of human movements helps the diagnosis of movement disorders and predicts the outcome of clinical intervention and medical rehabilitation. Here I present methods for recording kinematic and muscle activity patterns. Measurements can be compared with predicted movement patterns based on mathematical models. There are an infinity of different muscle activity patterns or joint rotation patterns to perform a given motor task. I present the main approaches that are used to find such solutions from the infinity of choices that might be employed by the central nervous system. I present a practical application of movement modeling: In rehabilitation of spinal cord injured patients we develop and apply artificially controlled neuroprostheses to generate active cycling lower limb movements in the patients of the National Institute for Medical Rehabilitation.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Extension of polynomial analysis of interstitial I-125 brachytherapy for 48 months]

KOLUMBÁN Zsuzsa, MAJOR Tibor, JULOW Jenő

[Objective - Previously we described from 20 patients’ data with our new “polynomial prediction approach” the volumetrical changes following gliomas I-125 brachytherapy. The aim of this study is to extend the polynomials for 48 months, and to carry out multivarial analysis of several different aspects. Methods - 20 inoperable low-grade gliomas were followed for a 48-month period after I-125 interstitial irradiation. The delivered dose on the tumor surface was 50-60 Gy. Dose planning and image fusion were done with the BrainLab Target 1.19 software, mathematical and statistical computations were carried out with the Matlab numeric computation and visualization software. Volumes of tumor necrosis, reactive zone and edema referred to as “triple ring” were measured on image fused control MRI and planning CT images. The measured volumes were normalized with respect to the reference volumes. Mean values of volumes were determined, then polynomials were fitted to the mean using the polynomial curve fitting method. The accuracy of our results was verified by correlating the predicted data with the measured ones. Results - We have found that the edema reaches its maximum two times after irradiation during the 48 months follow up period. We have shown that small tumors react more rapidly and creating greater volumes of the “triple ring” than bigger ones. Conclusions - The polynomial prediction approach proposed here reveals the dynamics of triple ring for 48 months. The derived polynomials and the multivarial analysis carried out afterwords help to (i) design the best treatment, (ii) follow up the patient's condition and (iii) plan reirradiation if necessary.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Phylo- and ontogenetic aspects of erect posture and walking in developmental neurology]

BERÉNYI Marianne, KATONA Ferenc, CARMEN Sanchez, MANDUJANO Mario

[The group or profile of elementary neuromotor patterns is different from the primitive reflex group which is now called the “primitive reflex profile.” All these elementary neuromotor patterns are characterized by a high degree of organization, persistence, and stereotypy. In many regards, these patterns are predecessors or precursors of from them the specific human motor patterns which appear spontaneously later as crawling, creeping, sitting, and walking with erect posture. On the basis of our experiences it can be stated that the elementary neuromotor patterns can be activated in all neonates and young infants as congenital motor functions. With regards to their main properties and functional forms, the normal patterns can be divided into two main groups: (1) One group is characterized by lifting of the head and complex chains of movements which are directed to the verticalization of the body; (2) The other group is characterized by complex movements directed to locomotion and change of body position. The neuromotor patterns can be activated by placing the human infant in specific body positions that trigger the vestibulospinal and the reticulospinal systems, the archicerebellum and the basal gangliae. Most of these systems display early myelinisation and are functioning very soon. Many of the elementary neuromotor patterns reflect the most important - spontaneously developing - forms of human movements such as sitting upright in space and head elevation crawling and walking. The majority of the human neuromotor patterns are human specific. When the infant is put in an activating position, crawling, sitting up, and walking begin and last as long as the activating position is maintained. Each elementary neuromotor pattern is a repeated, continuous train of complex movements in response to a special activating position. The brainstem is not sufficient to organize these complex movements, the integrity of the basal ganglia is also necessary. Elementary sensorimotor patterns during human ontogenesis reflect phylogenetic develpoment of species specific human functions. During ontogenesis spontaneous motor development gradually arises from these early specific sensorimotor predecessors.. The regular use of the elementary neuromotor patterns for diagnostic puposes has several distinct advantages. The neuromotor patterns have a natural stereotypy in normal infants and, therefore, deflections from this regular pattern may be detected easily, thus, the activation of the elementary neuromotor pattern is a more suitable method for identifying defects in the motor activity of the neonate or young infant than the assessment of the primitive reflexes. The “stiumulus positions,” which activate specific movements according to how the human neonate or young infant is positioned, do not activate such motor patterns in neonate or young primates including apes. The characteristic locomotor pattern in these adult primates, including the apes, is swinging and involves brachiation with an extreme prehensility. This species specific motor activity is reflected in the orangutan and gibbon neonates by an early extensive grasp. However, according to our investigations, no crawling, creeping, elementary walk, or sitting up can be activated in them. Neonates grasp the hair of the mother, a vital function for the survival of the young. In contemporary nonhuman primates including apes, the neonate brain is more mature. Thus, pronounced differences can be observed between early motor ontogenesis in the human and all other primates. The earliest human movements are complex performances rather than simple reflexes. The distinction between primitive reflexes and elementary neuromotor patterns is essential. Primitive reflexes are controlled by the brainstem. All can be activated in primates. These reflexes have short durations and contrary to elementary sensorimotor patterns occur only once in response to one stimulus, e.g., one head drop elicits one abduction-adduction of the upper extremities correlated to adduction and flexion of the lower extremities to a lesser degree with the Moro reflex. Elementary neuromotor patterns are much more complex and most of them including elementary walk may be elicited as early as the 19th-20th gestational week, though less perfectly than later.]

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[BIOMECHANICS OF INTRACRANIAL ANEURYSMS]

FARKAS István, NYÁRY István, RAFFAI Gábor, ZILAHY G, MONOS Emil

[Introduction - Viscoelastic parameters of circumferential and meridional strips of ruptured and silent aneurysms were investigated (considered clinical and histological data either) in order to advance the prediction of risk of aneurysm rupture. Method - In our clinical practice, aneurysms managed by microsurgery aneurysm clipping were removed. Meridional and circumferential strips were cut. Strips were investigated by an uniaxial biomechanical instrument: distending force was recorded as the length of the strips was increased in steps. Normal stress-relaxation patterns were detected. The shape of strain curves well overlapped with the Standard Linear Solid Model curve, as had been expected. The viscosity, serial and parallel elastic moduli of the model were then computed. Results - Linear correlation was demonstrated amongst peek distending force detected and aneurysm strip thickness. Steric inhomogenity was detected at the meridional and circumferential strips. Strain-stress behaviour of ruptured and silent aneurysm specimen showed significant difference. Values of strips originated from patients suffered from hypertension as well as strips originated from aneurysms had been histologically found inflamed were higher. Discussion - Results of these observations are going to be used to set three dimensional computer model in cooperation with IT team of Budapest University of Technology and Economics to advance rupture risk prediction.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

[Use of a drug-eluting stent for the treatment of in-stent restenosis of the superior mesenteric artery]

P. SZABÓ Réka, PÉTER Mózes, VARGA István, VAJDA Gusztáv, HARANGI Mariann, MÁTYUS János, BALLA József

[INTRODUCTION - Diagnosis and treating intestinal ischaemia in time presents a great challenge for clinicians. CASE REPORT - In a 60-year-old woman on dialysis who presented with abdominal angina, angiography revealed stenosis of the superior mesenteric artery, which was treated by implantation of a 6×29 mm Genesis stent. After a year, her symptoms reoccurred and angiography revealed restenosis, which was treated with a 7×34 mm Wallstent, while her previous acetylsalicylic acid treatment was supplemented with clopidrogel. Nevertheless, her abdominal angina reoccurred again after a year. During the next intervention - because of the in-stent restenosis - a Taxus Liberte stent was implanted. During the dual antiplatelet therapy, her abdominal complaints did not reoccur, her body weight increased and angiography did not reveal restenosis in the affected artery even after 4 years. CONCLUSIONS - A drug-eluting stent can be a good choice in case of restenosis of the superior mesenteric artery. In a stented patient, it is crucial to use an appropriately controlled, long-term, dual antiplatelet therapy.]

Hungarian Radiology

[Complications after subtotal extirpation of the esophagus and the radiological aspects of their treatment]

VÁGÓ Andrea, LUKOVICH Péter, FARKAS Szabolcs, KISS Katalin, KUPCSULIK Péter

[INTRODUCTION - Complications after subtotal esophageal extirpation (for eg.: insufficiency of anastomosis, stricture, etc.) and their treatment have special radiological considerations. Surgical departments and their radiologists meet early complications. But, all other radiological departments can face late complications, so the knowledge of these is important for all radiologists. PATIENT AND METHODS - 58 subtotal esophageal extirpations were performed in the last 5 years in the 1st Department of Surgery, Semmelweis University, Budapest. All postoperative radiological examinations were undertaken by the Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Oncotherapy. Most plain chest X-rays and swallowing examinations were made per-os with non ionic water soluble, low osmolarity contrast media on the 7th postoperative day. Further examinations were performed only if needed clinically. RESULTS - The complications were categorized as early and late. Early complications were aspiration, anastomosis insufficiency (31% of cases). Nine cases had self-dilating stents placed because of suture insufficiency. Further complications were noted following stenting (eg.: occlusion, dislocation of stent, closure of stent because of granulation tissues). Amongst late complications, stomach dilatation caused by pylorus-spasm (1 case), stricture of anastomosis (14 cases) and ’too-long’ esophageal stump (3 cases) were seen. CONCLUSION - Conventional radiology has a major role in diagnostics and treatment of complications of esophageal extirpation. Dynamic radiological examination and team work are required between the radiologist and surgeon. Also, it is crucial to cultivate good cooperation in cases of stent implantation, as contrary to the published literature, we find it better to have stents placed under flouroscopy rather than endoscopically.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Subarachnoid hemorrhage in Hungary. Analysis based on the reports of the hospitals to the National Health Insurance Fund in 2009]

KOZÁK Norbert, SZABÓ Sándor, AJTAY András, BERECZKI Dániel

[Background and purpose - We analyzed the statistical characteristics of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) in Hungary in 2009. Methods - Using data supplied by the hospitals about their inpatient services to the National Health Insurance Fund with ICD-10 code I60. Results - 1403 SAH hospital cases were recorded in 1028 patients. That is much more than we expected from previous data. 63.6% were women, hospital case fatality was 12.2%. The average hospital stay was 6.47 days. 763 CT examinations were done (74.2% of the patients). Hypertension was recorded in 61.3% of the patients. The incidence was increasing with age till the age group of 51- 60 years, and decreased beyond that. In 531 patients the source of bleeding could be verified. Aneurysm of the anterior communicating artery was more frequent in men, aneurysm of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) and internal carotid artery in women. In total MCA aneurysm was the most frequent. Arteriovenous malformation was present in 7.6% of the patients. SAH was most frequent in January and February, rarest in April and August. Conclusion - SAH is more frequent in Hungary than previously thought.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Factors affecting the development of chronic hydrocephalus following subarachnoid hemorrhage]

FÜLÖP Béla, DEÁK Gábor, MENCSER Zoltán, KUNCZ Ádám, BARZÓ Pál

[Hydrocephalus is a common complication of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. Numerous studies have dealt so far with the triggering cause of the chronic cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) absorptional and circulatory disorders. Despite the fact that these studies gave several different explanations, most of them agreed on the fact that the obstruction of CSF pathway has a crucial role in the development of the clinical feature. By examing three years’ clinical cases they the authors were trying to find out which are the factors that influence the development of the late hydrocephalus which succeeds the subarachnoid hemorrhage; moreover to find out if the incidence of the latter may be decreased by a continuous drainage of CSF which advances its purification. One hundred and seventy-one patients (one hundred and twenty-seven females) were treated by aneurysmal SAH at Department of Neurosurgery, University of Szeged between 2002 and 2005. The following parameters were recorded: gender, clinical state, risk factors (smoking, consuming alcohol and hypertension), the method and the time of surgical treatment as well as CSF drainage. The studies have shown that the risk of incidence of chronic hydrocephalus’s incidence were higher in men and in case of severe clinical state with severe SAH. The disturbed CSF circulation and/or absorption were positively correlated with consuming alcohol and hypertension, while smoking did not affect it. The rate of the incidence of chronic hydrocephalus among our patients was lower (5.8%) compared to the results of other studies (7-40%) suggests that disturbance of CSF circulation and/or absorption may be avoided in the majority of cases by continuous external ventricular or lumbar CSF drainage, which is applied routinly.]