Clinical Neuroscience

[The carrier model of neurology in Hungary: a proposal for the solution until 2020]

BERECZKI Dániel, CSIBA László, KOMOLY Sámuel, VÉCSEI László, AJTAY András

NOVEMBER 30, 2011

Clinical Neuroscience - 2011;64(11-12)

[Based on our previous survey on the capacities of neurological services and on the predictable changes in the neurologist workforce in Hungary, we present a proposal for the organization of the structure of neurological services in the future. We discuss the diagnostic groups treated by neurologists, the neurological services and their progressive organization. Using the current capacities as baseline, we propose patient groups to be treated by neurologists in the future, and the levels of services. Based on the tendencies seen in the last years we suggest to consider to allocate acute stroke services exclusively to stroke units in neurological departments, and we identify a few other diagnostic groups where neurology should have a larger share in patient care. We define three levels for inpatient care: university departments, regional/county hospitals, city hospitals. Instead of minimum criteria we assign outpatient and inpatient standards that are functional from the economic point of view as well. University departments cover all areas of neurological services, have a function in graduate and postgraduate training, and on a regional basis they participate in professional quality assurance activities at the county and city hospital levels, and would have a more independent role in residency training. As far as patient care is concerned, the task of the regional/county hospitals would be similar to that of university departments - without the exclusively university functions. A general neurological service would be offered at the city hospital level - the representation of all subspecialties of neurology is not required. Neurorehabilitation would be organized at special units of neurological wards at the city hospital level, at independent neurorehabilitation wards in regional/county hospitals, and also as an outpatient service offered at the patients’ home. The most significant organizational change would affect the outpatient neurological services. In addition to the special outpatient units associated with university departments and regional/county hospitals, the general neurological outpatient services would be organized as private practices, similarly to the current system of general practitioners, where the individual practices contract independently with the health insurance fund. Their task would be a general neurological service offered 30 hours per week, and also basic, screening neurophysiological and neurosonological examinations, with proper equipment and trained assistance. A transformation in residency training and a change in financing is needed for this plan to fulfill.]

COMMENTS

0 comments

Further articles in this publication

Clinical Neuroscience

[Complementer medicine - on principles of evidence based medicine]

ORVOSI Tudományok Osztálya

Clinical Neuroscience

[Account on the XIXth Congress of Hungarian Neuroradiological Society]

VÖRÖS Erika

Clinical Neuroscience

[Theoretical and practical considerations of rational polytherapy in epilepsy]

RAJNA Péter

[Author analyses the consideration of rational polytherapy for epilepsy. Among the theoretical aspects he points the different effect of seizure inhibitory drugs on the epilepsy models but didn’t find data enough for the basis of any successful combination. Combinations of compounds having different way of action are more promising. Rational polytherapy can serve also the epileptic patients’ tailored therapy in the daily routine. There have already been some proved synergisms concerning drug interactions. Based on detailed analysis of side effects a possibility occurs for neutralization of side effects when anticonvulsants with side effects of opposite nature are combined. Considering both the side effect profiles and the different (somatic and psychic) habits of the patients we can create a special list of favourable combinations. Co-morbid states and their treatments play a significant role in the application of rational polytherapy. Combination of anticonvulsants of lower potential but without drug-interactions can be the choice in these cases. The non-epileptic indications of the anticonvulsants can also be utilized in polymorbid patients. Based on the theoretical and practical considerations the author defines the ten-step-cognitive-preparation-process in planning the optimal (poly)therapy. On speculative basis he suggests eight beneficial versions of seizure inhibitory rational polytherapy.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Singer Magdolna, Szabolcs Judit: The children who change our fate The way of children with special educational needs toward the health]

NEUWIRTH Magdolna

Clinical Neuroscience

[Subarachnoid hemorrhage in Hungary. Analysis based on the reports of the hospitals to the National Health Insurance Fund in 2009]

KOZÁK Norbert, SZABÓ Sándor, AJTAY András, BERECZKI Dániel

[Background and purpose - We analyzed the statistical characteristics of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) in Hungary in 2009. Methods - Using data supplied by the hospitals about their inpatient services to the National Health Insurance Fund with ICD-10 code I60. Results - 1403 SAH hospital cases were recorded in 1028 patients. That is much more than we expected from previous data. 63.6% were women, hospital case fatality was 12.2%. The average hospital stay was 6.47 days. 763 CT examinations were done (74.2% of the patients). Hypertension was recorded in 61.3% of the patients. The incidence was increasing with age till the age group of 51- 60 years, and decreased beyond that. In 531 patients the source of bleeding could be verified. Aneurysm of the anterior communicating artery was more frequent in men, aneurysm of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) and internal carotid artery in women. In total MCA aneurysm was the most frequent. Arteriovenous malformation was present in 7.6% of the patients. SAH was most frequent in January and February, rarest in April and August. Conclusion - SAH is more frequent in Hungary than previously thought.]

All articles in the issue

Related contents

Clinical Neuroscience

[Neurology 2009: a survey of the neurological capacities, their utilization and neurologists based on the 2009 reports of the institutions in Hungary]

BERECZKI Dániel, AJTAY András

[A detailed information on the quantitative and qualitative features and the regional distribution of the current neurological services at the national level is necessary for the planning of health care provision for the future. We present the characteristics of the current neurological services analyzing the database of the National Health Insurance Fund for 2009. This database is exceptionally large and detailed compared to similar data sources in Europe. We examine the number of patients and cases treated both in hospitals and at outpatient units, and also present the distribution of major diagnoses based on ICD-10. We discuss the major problems in three groups: the decrease of capacities; the fragmentation of capacities; and the uneven distribution of workload on neurologists. Number of neurological hospital beds, weekly hours of neurological outpatient capacity, and the number of neurologists are presented. In the analysis of the utilization of capacities we give the number of patients, the number of cases and the financing of the professional performance. We characterize the workload of neurologists by the mean daily number of patients seen by a neurologist, by the number of outpatient units served by one neurologist during the year, and by the proportion of the total workload on each neurologist. Neurological capacities significantly decreased in the period of 2004-2009: 12 hospital neurological wards were closed, and with further decreases in bed numbers the original 3733 neurological beds decreased to 2812. In four counties - Bács, Heves, Tolna and Vas - only a single neurological ward survived. The capacity withdrawn from inpatient care was not transferred into outpatient services. In 2009 there were 179 hospitals and 419 independent outpatient centers in Hungary. Of the 179 hospitals 55 had neurological beds and a further 42 hospitals offered only outpatient neurological service. Neurological outpatient service is offered in Hungary altogether by 185 institutions: 97 hospitals and 88 independent outpatient centers. Suboptimal outpatient services (less than 30 hours per week) cover 57% of the outpatient capacities. There is an over fivefold difference among counties in capacities: the number of inhabitants per hospital bed ranges between 2167-13 017, and the number of inhabitants per one neurologist outpatient hour between 495-2663. In 2009 there were 1310 board certified neurologists in Hungary, of these only 834 participated at least once during the year in exclusively neurological service, and there was a large difference in workload among individual neurologists. The gross mean income of a 30-hour-per-week average neurological outpatient practice based on performance reports was 871 thousand HUF (about 4350 USD or 3160 EUR) per month. In recent years the neurological capacities significantly decreased and fragmented, do not correspond regionally to the number of population to be served, and their profitability does not cover the conditions of self sufficient operation. This analysis will help health care providers and decision makers to recognize and address the current problems and design the neurological health care system for the coming years.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Neurological aspects of the COVID-19 pandemic caused by the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus]

BERECZKI Dániel, STANG Rita, BÖJTI Péter, KOVÁCS Tibor

[By the spring of 2020 the COVID-19 outbreak caused by the new SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus has become a pandemic, requiring fast and efficient reaction from societies and health care systems all over the world. Fever, coughing and dyspnea are considered the major signs of COVID-19. In addition to the involvement of the respiratory system, the infection may result in other symptoms and signs as well. Based on reports to date, neurological signs or symptoms appear in 30-50% of hospitalized COVID-19 patients, with higher incidence in those with more severe disease. Classical acute neurological syndromes have also been reported to associate with COVID-19. A drop in the volume of services for other acute diseases has been described in countries with healthcare systems focusing on COVID-19. During the COVID-19 epidemic it is also important to provide appropriate continuous care for those with chronic neurological disorders. It will be the task of the future to estimate the collateral damage caused by the COVID-19 epidemic on the outcome of other neurological disorders, and to screen for the possible late neurological complications of the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus infection.]

Clinical Neuroscience

To handle the HaNDL syndrome through a case: The syndrome of headache with neurologic deficits and cerebrospinal fluid lymphocytosis

ÇOBAN Eda, TEKER Ruken Serap, SERİNDAĞ Helin, SAKALLI Nazan, SOYSAL Aysun

The syndrome of headache with neurologic deficits and cerebrospinal fluid lymphocytosis (HaNDL) is a rare entity. This disease has been related to migrainous headaches. It is a benign, self-limited disorder, which is characterized by fluctuating neurological symptoms and cerebrospinal fluid lymphocytosis. We describe a case of a 47 years old man with acute onset of headache and aphasia. Cerebrospinal fluid analysis revealed a lymphocytic pleocytosis (25 cells/μl, 100% lymphocytes). Electroencephalogram showed moderate slow rhythm in the left hemisphere, with temporoparietal predominance, and without epileptiform activity. His blood tests as well as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) results were normal. With the diagnosis of HaNDL syndrome the patient was accepted in the Department of Neurology and discharged with full recovery.