Clinical Neuroscience

[Synopsis of Spine Surgery]

HOWARD S. An, KERN Singh, ET al

JANUARY 30, 2010

Clinical Neuroscience - 2010;63(01-02)

COMMENTS

0 comments

Further articles in this publication

Clinical Neuroscience

[Clinical immunological and immunogenetical aspects of neurological diseases]

PÉTERFALVI Ágnes

Clinical Neuroscience

[Hungarian Epilepsy League - Account on the meeting of the Hungarian Epilepsy League]

SZUPERA Zoltán

Clinical Neuroscience

[How does the brain create rhythms?]

SZIRMAI Imre

[Connection was found between rhythmic cortical activity and motor control. The 10 Hz μ-rhythm and the 20-30 Hz bursts represent two functional states of the somatomotor system. A correspondence of the central μ-rhythm of the motor cortex and the physiological hand tremor (8-12 Hz) is presumed. The precise tuning of the motor system can be estimated by the frequency of repetitive finger movements. In complex tapping exercise, the index finger is the most skillful, the 3rd, 4th and 5th fingers keep rhythm with less precision. It was found that the organization of mirror movements depends on the cortical representation of fingers. Mirror finger movements are more regular if the subject begins the motor action with the 5th (small) finger. Concerning cortical regulation of finger movements, it was suggested that there are two time-keeping systems in the brain; one with a sensitivity above and another with a sensitivity below the critical frequency of 3 Hz. The preferred meter which helps to maintain synchronous finger movements is the cadence of 4/4 and 8/8. We observed that the unlearned inward-outward sequential finger movement was equally impaired in nonmusician controls and patients with Parkinson-disease. In movement disorders, the ability of movement and the “clock-mechanism” are equally involved. The polyrhythmic finger movement is not our inborn ability, it has to be learned. The “timer” function, which regulates the rhythmic movement, is presumably localised in the basal ganglia or in the cerebellum. The meter of the music is built on the reciprocal values of 2 raised to the second to fifth power (1/12, 1/22, 1/23, 1/24, 1/25). The EEG frequencies that we consider important in the regulation of cons-cious motor actions are approximately in the same domain (4, 8, 16, 32, 64 Hz). During music performance, an important neural process is the coupling of distant brain areas. Concerning melody, the musical taste of Europeans is octavebased. Musical ornaments also follow the rule of the gothic construction, that is: pursuit of harmony towards the single one rising from the unification of 8-4-2 classes. Leibnitz concerned music as the unconscious mathematics of the soul. Movement-initiating effect of music is used in rehabilitation of patients with movement disorders. The meter and rhythm have superiority over the melody. It is possible that rhythmic movements can be generated also in the absence of sensory input and the central oscillators can produce “fictive motor patterns”.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Extracellular matrix of intracerebral tumors with different invasion activity]

KLEKNER Álmos, VARGA Imre, BOGNÁR László, HUTÓCZKI Gábor, KENYERES Annamária, TÓTH Judit, HANZÉLY Zoltán, SCHOLTZ Beáta

[Objectives - Ineffective surgical and radiotherapy of glioblastoma is mainly due to its intensive infiltrating behavior. Contrarily, brain metastases of anaplastic carcinomas are well-circumscribed intracerebral lesions that can be easily exstirpated in most cases. The molecules of the extracellular matrix (ECM) play a pivotal role in the peritumoral infiltration. In this study the mRNA expression of the ECM components was investigated in two types of intracerebral malignoma with different invasion activity. Our aim was to identify the ECM molecules that are responsible for the different intensity of peritumoral infiltration of tumors from different origin. Methods - The mRNA expression of twenty-three ECM molecules was determined by quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Four pieces of glioblastoma and four pieces of intracerebral lung adenocarcinoma metastasis from neurosurgical operation were investigated. Immunohistochemical investigations were performed in case of five molecules. Results - The mRNA expression of nine molecules (brevican, neurocan, neuroglycan-C, syndecan-1,2,4, tenascin-C, versican and matrix-metalloproteinase-[MMP]2) differed significantly by comparison of the two tumor types. By immunohistochemistry, neurocan, syndecan, versican and MMP-2 showed alteration in staining intensity according to the mRNA expression, while MMP-9 showed higher staining intensity in the metastatic tumor. Conclusions - The identified molecules can play an important role in the different infiltration activity of tumors from different origin. Thus these ECM-components could serve as targets for anti-invasion therapy in the future.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Molecular genetic mutation analysis in Menkes-disease with prenatal diagnosis]

LÁSZLÓ Aranka, ENDREFFY Emőke, TÜMER Zeynep, HORN Nina, SZABÓ János

[Menkes disease (MD) is an X-linked recessive multisystemic lethal, heredodegenerative disorder. Progressive neurodegeneration and connective tissue disturbances with microscopically kinky hair are the main symptoms. Molecular genetic mutation analysis was made at a Hungarian male infant suffering from MD and prenatal diagnosis was done in this MD loaded family. Method - The 12th exon of ATP7A gene has been analyzed by dideoxy-finger printing (DDF), polymerase chain reaction (PCR), direct sequencing of exon 12. The specific mutation was screened from chorionic villi of the maternal aunt at the 14th gestational week. Results - In the exon 12th a basic pair substitution with Arg 844 His change was detected leading to very severe fatal missense mutation.]

All articles in the issue

Related contents

Clinical Neuroscience

Neuroscience highlights: Main cell types underlying memory and spatial navigation

KRABOTH Zoltán, KÁLMÁN Bernadette

Interest in the hippocampal formation and its role in navigation and memory arose in the second part of the 20th century, at least in part due to the curious case of Henry G. Molaison, who underwent brain surgery for intractable epilepsy. The temporal association observed between the removal of his entorhinal cortex along with a significant part of hippocampus and the developing severe memory deficit inspired scientists to focus on these regions. The subsequent discovery of the so-called place cells in the hippocampus launched the description of many other functional cell types and neuronal networks throughout the Papez-circuit that has a key role in memory processes and spatial information coding (speed, head direction, border, grid, object-vector etc). Each of these cell types has its own unique characteristics, and together they form the so-called “Brain GPS”. The aim of this short survey is to highlight for practicing neurologists the types of cells and neuronal networks that represent the anatomical substrates and physiological correlates of pathological entities affecting the limbic system, especially in the temporal lobe. For that purpose, we survey early discoveries along with the most relevant neuroscience observations from the recent literature. By this brief survey, we highlight main cell types in the hippocampal formation, and describe their roles in spatial navigation and memory processes. In recent decades, an array of new and functionally unique neuron types has been recognized in the hippocampal formation, but likely more remain to be discovered. For a better understanding of the heterogeneous presentations of neurological disorders affecting this anatomical region, insights into the constantly evolving neuroscience behind may be helpful. The public health consequences of diseases that affect memory and spatial navigation are high, and grow as the population ages, prompting scientist to focus on further exploring this brain region.

Clinical Neuroscience

Autonomic nervous system may be affected after carpal tunnel syndrome surgery: A possible mechanism for persistence of symptoms after surgery

ONDER Burcu, KELES Yavuz Betul

After carpal tunnel surgery, some patients report complaints such as edema, pain, and numbness. Purpose – The aim of this study was to evaluate autonomic nervous system function in patients with a history of carpal tunnel surgery using sympathetic skin response (SSR). Thirty three patients (55 ±10 years old) with a history of unilateral operation for carpal tunnel syndrome were included in the study. The SSR test was performed for both hands. Both upper extremities median and ulnar nerve conduction results were recorded. A reduced amplitude (p=0.006) and delayed latency (p<0.0001) were detected in the SSR test on the operated side compared to contralateral side. There was no correlation between SSR and carpal tunnel syndrome severity. Although complex regional pain syndrome does not develop in patients after carpal tunnel surgery, some of the complaints may be caused by effects on the autonomic nervous system.

Clinical Neuroscience

Cyanocobalamin and cholecalciferol synergistically improve functional and histopathological nerve healing in experimental rat model

ALBAY Cem, ADANIR Oktay, AKKALP Kahraman Asli, DOGAN Burcu Vasfiye, GULAEC Akif Mehmet, BEYTEMUR Ozan

Introduction - Peripheral nerve injury (PNI) is a frequent problem among young adults. Hopefully, regeneration can occur in PNI unlike central nervous system. If nerve cut is complete, gold standard treatment is surgery, but incomplete cuts have been tried to be treated by medicines. The aim of the study was to evaluate and compare clinical and histopathological outcomes of independent treatment of each of Vitamin B12 (B12) and Vitamin D3 (D3) and their combination on sciatic nerve injury in an experimental rat model. Materials and methods - Experimental animal study was performed after the approval of BEH Ethics Committee No. 2015/10. 32 rats were grouped into four (n=8) according to treatment procedures, such as Group 1 (controls with no treatment), Group 2 (intraperitoneal 1 mg/kg/day B12), Group 3 (oral 3500 IU/kg/week D3), Group 4 (intraperitoneal 1 mg/kg/day B12+ oral 3500 IU/kg/week D3). Sciatic Functional Index (SFI) and histopathological analysis were performed. Results - SFIs of Group 2, 3, 4 were statistically significantly higher than controls. Group 2 and 3 were statistically not different, however Group 4 was statistically significantly higher than others according to SFI. Axonal degeneration (AD) in all treatment groups were statistically significantly lower than in Group 1. AD in Group 4 was significantly lower than in Group 2 and 3; there was no significant difference between Group 2 and 3. There was no significant difference between Group 1,2 and 3 in Axonolysis (A). But A of Group 4 was significantly very much lower than all others. Oedema- inflammation (OE-I) in all treatment groups were significantly lower than in Group 1; there was no significant difference between Group 2 and group 4. OE-I in Group 2 and 4 were significantly lower than in Group 3. There were no significant differences between Group 1, 2 and 3 in damage level scores; score of Group 4 was significantly lower than of Group 1. Conclusions - B12 and D3 were found effective with no statistically significant difference. But combined use of B12 and D3 improve nerve healing synergistically. We recommend combined use of B12 and D3 after PNI as soon as possible.

Hungarian Radiology

[Successful radiological diagnostics in Bouveret’s syndrome]

KISS Katalin, FARKAS Szabolcs, LUKOVICH Péter, MAGYAR Péter, MESTER Ádám, MAKÓ Ernő

[INTRODUCTION - Bouveret’s syndrome I is a rare clinical entity, a special form of gallstone ileus. Based on a case study the authors describe the clinical presentation, the complications and diagnostic work up of the Bouveret’s syndrome I. CASE REPORT - A 75-year-old female patient with repeated vomiting and haematemesis was examined. Known gallstones and obstructive jaundice was noted in the case history. Urgent gastroscopy was performed at admission, which proved haemorrhagic esophagitis as the cause of the haematemesis. A gallstone was found by endoscopy distal to the pyloric region obstructing the bowel lumen. Radiological examinations proved the presence of the stone exactly at the localization that was given. Surgery confirmed the diagnosis. CONCLUSION - Bouveret’s syndrome I should be considered in patients with repeated and long lasting vomiting and bile stone in the case history. Conventional X-ray may be sufficient to establish the diagnosis, however further imaging studies are needed to clarify exact anatomical situation and potential complications of the disease.]

Lege Artis Medicinae

[LIMB LENGTHENING]

VÍZKELETY Tibor, KISS Sándor

[The method of gradual limb lengthening plays a significant role in equalizing limb discrepancies, making dwarfs taller, correcting axial and other deformities coexisting with limb deficiency. Limb lengthening is carried out by one of two basic methods: diaphyseal lengthening with the Wagner unilateral distraction apparatus or metaphyseal lengthening with a series of rings and crossed K-wires. Gradual limb lengthening is presently having its golden days. At our institution 302 limb lengthening intervention were done between 1977 and 2002, 164 cases with Wagner, 137 cases with Ilizarov method, and one distraction epiphyseolysis. In average, 4.1 cm lengthening was achieved, 18.4% of the original length of the bone. The high incidence of complications was due to superficial infections at the entry points of the Kwires, infrequently worsening the outcome of the operation. Operative limb lengthening performed with appropriate indications and technique is a successful and rewarding area of orthopaedic surgery.]