Clinical Neuroscience

[Survey of adults with epilepsy in Hungary: health related quality of life and costs]

PÉNTEK Márta, BERECZKI Dániel, GULÁCSI László, MIKUDINA Boglárka, ARÁNYI Zsuzsanna, JUHOS Vera, BAJI Petra, BRODSZKY Valentin

JULY 30, 2013

Clinical Neuroscience - 2013;66(07-08)

[Background and purpose - Disease burden of epilepsy in Hungary is underexplored. The aim of our study was to assess the quality of life and costs of adults with epilepsy. Methods - Cross-sectional questionnaire survey was performed in two hospital based outpatient neurology centres involving consecutive patients with epilepsy. Demography, clinical characteristics, health status (EQ-5D) and health care utilisation in the past 12 months were surveyed. Cost calculation was performed from the societal perspective. Results - Altogether 100 patients (women 58%) were involved, their mean age was 37.6 (SD=12.5) years. Disease duration was 15.0 (SD=12.1) years on average and 22 (22%) patients were disability pensioners. The EQ- 5D score was mean 0.83 (SD=0.24) which is significantly lower than the age-matched population norm (p=0.017). Pain/discomfort and anxiety/depression are the most problematic health dimensions. The annual cost per patient was mean 2421 (SD=3249) Euros (679 397 SD=911 783 HUF; conversion: 1 Euro=280.6 HUF), distribution between direct medical, direct non-medical and indirect costs was 33%, 18% or 49%. Patients with seizure in the past 12 months have higher cost on avergare than the asymptomatic subsample (3119 vs. 988 Euros/patient/year; 935 481 vs. 277 209 HUF/patient/year). Conclusion - Adults with epilepsy have significantly worse health status by the EQ-5D than the gender and age matched Hungarian general population. Disease related costs are significant especially in cases with seizure, productivity loss related costs are dominant. Our study provides basic data for clinical and sustainable health care financing decisions.]

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Clinical Neuroscience

[Shunt insufficiency due to knot formation in the peritoneal catheter]

FEKETE Gábor, NAGY Andrea, PATAKI István, BOGNÁR László, NOVÁK László

[The authors report a rare case of the peripheral obstruction of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt. Premature baby was operated on hydrocephalus due to germinal matrix bleeding. After two months of implantation of venticuloperitoneal shunt peripheral insufficiency of the system was emerged. During the shunt revision extensive knot formation became visible. We simply cut the catheter above the knot and the working shunt was replaced into the abdominal cavity. The postoperative course was uneventful and the baby was free of complaints for more than one year. The pathomechanism of knot formation is not clear thus the discovery of the problem during the operation is an unexpected event. In our opinion tight knot cannot be spontaneously formed intraabdominally. Loose knots can be developed and can reduce the capacity of liquor flow. We think that the knot tightens during pulling out. Longer peritoneal catheters can precipitate multiple looping and/or axial torquations and increase the peripheral resistance of the shunt. In such cases when the pulling out is challenged conversion to laparotomy is suggested.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Prenatal diagnosis of central nervous system malformations]

LANGMÁR Zoltán, NÉMETH Miklós, CSABA Ákos, SZIGETI Zsanett, JOÓ József Gábor

[The prenatal diagnosis of fetal malformations have been the subject of numerous publications in the literature. This has dramatically increased in the last 15 years, mainly due to the advent of high-resolution ultrasound. In addition adequate guidelines issued by professional organizations have encouraged the universal approach to the imaging of fetal anatomy as well as malformations. One of the most significant groups of the fetal anomalies is the central nervous system malformation. Due to its prevalence and severity the praenatal diagnostics of central nervous system malformations got basic significance. In this review we attempted to summarize the recent informations concerning the praenatal diagnostics of the central nervous system anomalies.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Efficacy and safety of tolperisone in spasticity following cerebral stroke]

LIPTÁK Judit

Clinical Neuroscience

[Exploration of quality of life goals in rehabilitation of persons after spinal cord injury]

TÓTH Katalin, PUTZ Miklós, KULLMANN Lajos

[Background and purpose - Surveyed references indicate improvement of rehabilitation outcomes if based on exploration of personal rehabilitation goals or quality of life goals. Purpose of our study is mapping of quality of life goals of persons entering rehabilitation by structured interviews, and study of applicability of the method. Methods - Structured interviews have been performed with persons consecutively admitted for their first rehabilitation intervention, meeting inclusion criteria. World Health Organization’s quality of life measure brief version and disability module served as guideline for the interviews. For study any negative effect on rehabilitation of our approach we have compared rehabilitation outcomes of consecutively admitted persons immediately before starting our study (58) and those with closed rehabilitation intervention (53). For this purpose the Functional Independence Measure was used. Finally content analysis of the interviews has been performed. Results - In 24 cases complications and psychological instability have prevented the inclusion, seven persons did not agree into participation in the study. Of the 71 interview participants the rehabilitation of 53 persons concluded. Their rehabilitation outcomes are better as of the control group significant difference has been measured in the social functions domain. Quality of life of included persons decreased during the rehabilitation process insignificantly, the autonomy domain showed insignificant improvement, the inclusion domain did not change. Content analysis revealed the outstanding role of the family among quality of life goals. Conclusions - Reported results indicate that exploration of quality of life goals of persons in early phase of rehabilitation after spinal cord injury is feasible. The selected quality of life measure may well support the interviews.]

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Clinical Neuroscience

[Zonisamide: one of the first-line antiepileptic drugs in focal epilepsy ]

JANSZKY József, HORVÁTH Réka, KOMOLY Sámuel

[Chronic administration of antiepileptic drugs without history of unprovoked epileptic seizures are not recommended for epilepsy prophylaxis. Conversely, if the patient suffered the first unprovoked seizure, then the presence of epileptiform discharges on the EEG, focal neurological signs, and the presence of epileptogenic lesion on the MRI are risk factors for a second seizure (such as for the development of epilepsy). Without these risk factors, the chance of a second seizure is about 25-30%, while the presence of these risk factors (for example signs of previous stroke, neurotrauma, or encephalitis on the MRI) can predict >70% seizure recurrence. Thus the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) re-defined the term ’epilepsy’ which can be diagnosed even after the first seizure, if the risk of seizure recurrence is high. According to this definition, we can start antiepileptic drug therapy after a single unprovoked seizure. There are four antiepileptic drugs which has the highest evidence (level „A”) as first-line initial monotherapy for treating newly diagnosed epilepsy. These are: carbamazepine, phenytoin, levetiracetam, and zonisamide (ZNS). The present review focuses on the ZNS. Beacuse ZNS can be administrated once a day, it is an optimal drug for maintaining patient’s compliance and for those patients who have a high risk for developing a non-compliance (for example teenagers and young adults). Due to the low interaction potential, ZNS treatment is safe and effective in treating epilepsy of elderly people. ZNS is an ideal drug in epilepsy accompanied by obesity, because ZNS has a weight loss effect, especially in obese patients.]

Clinical Neuroscience

Effects of valproate, carbamazepine and levetiracetam on Tp-e interval, Tp-e/QT and Tp-e/QTc ratio

YASAR Altun, ERDOGAN Yasar

Aim - To evaluate P-wave dispersion before and after antiepileptic drug (AED) treatment as well as to investigate the risk of ventricular repolarization using the Tpeak-Tend (Tp-e) interval and Tp-e/QT ratio in patients with epileptic disorder. Methods - A total of 63 patients receiving AED therapy and 35 healthy adults were included. ECG recordings were obtained before and 3 months after anti-epileptic treatment among patients with epilepsy. For both groups, Tp-e and Tp-e/QT ratio were measured using a 12-lead ECG device. Results - Tp-e interval, Tpe/QT and Tp-e/QTc ratios were found to be higher in the patient group than in the control group (p<0.05, for all), while QTmax ratio was significantly lower in the patient group. After 3 months of AED therapy, significant increases in QT max, QTc max, QTcd, Tp-e, Tp-e/QT, and Tp-e/QTc were found among the patients (p<0.05). When the arrhythmic effects of the drugs before and after treatment were compared, especially in the valproic acid group, there were significant increases in Tp-e interval, Tp-e/QT and Tp-e/QTc values after three months of treatment (p<0.05). Carbamazepine and levetiracetam groups were not statistically significant in terms of pre- and post-treatment values. Conclusions - It was concluded that an arrhythmogenic environment may be associated with the disease, and patients who received AED monotherapy may need to be followed up more closely for arrhythmia.

Clinical Neuroscience

EEG-based connectivity in patients with partial seizures with and without generalization

DÖMÖTÖR Johanna, CLEMENS Béla, EMRI Miklós, PUSKÁS Szilvia, FEKETE István

Objective - to investigate the neurophysiological basis of secondary generalization of partial epileptic seizures. Patients and methods - inter-ictal, resting-state EEG functional connectivity (EEGfC) was evaluated and compared: patients with exclusively simple partial seizures (sp group) were compared to patients with simple partial and secondary generalized seizures (spsg group); patients with exclusively complex partial seizures (cp group) were compared to patients with cp and secondary generalized seizures (cpsg group); the collapsed sp+cp group (spcp) was compared to those who had exclusively secondary generalized seizures (sg group). EEGfC was computed from 21-channel waking EEG. 3 minutes of waking EEG background activity was analyzed by the LORETA Source Correlation (LSC) software. Current source density time series were computed for 23 pre-defined cortical regions (ROI) in each hemisphere, for the 1-25 Hz very narrow bands (1 Hz bandwidth). Thereafter Pearson correlation coefficients were calculated between all pairs of ROI time series in the same hemisphere. Z-scored correlation coefficients were compared at the group level (t-tests and correction for multiple comparisons by local false discovery rate, FDR). Results - Statistically significant (corrected p<0.05) EEGfC differences emerged at specific frequencies (spsg > sg; cpsg > cp), and at many frequencies (sg > spcp). The findings indicated increased coupling between motor cortices and several non-motor areas in patients with partial and sg seizures as compared to patients with partial seizures and no sg seizures. Further findings suggested increased coupling between medial parietal-occipital areas (structural core of the cortex) and lateral hemispheric areas. Conclusion - increased inter-ictal EEGfC is associated with habitual occurrence of secondary generalized seizures.

Clinical Neuroscience

[Earlier and more efficiently: the role of deep brain stimulation for parkinson’s disease preserving the working capabilities]

DELI Gabriella, BALÁS István, KOMOLY Sámuel, DÓCZI Tamás, JANSZKY József, ASCHERMANN Zsuzsanna, NAGY Ferenc, BOSNYÁK Edit, KOVÁCS Norbert

[Background – The recently published “EarlyStim” study demonstrated that deep brain stimulation (DBS) for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease (PD) with early fluctuations is superior to the optimal pharmacological treatment in improving the quality of life and motor symptoms, and preserving sociocultural position. Our retrospective investigation aimed to evaluate if DBS therapy was able to preserve the working capabilities of our patients. Methods – We reviewed the data of 39 young (<60 years-old) PD patients who underwent subthalamic DBS implantation at University of Pécs and had at least two years follow-up. Patients were categorized into two groups based on their working capabilities: Patients with active job (“Job+” group, n=15) and retired patients (without active job, “Job-” group, n=24). Severity of motor symptoms (UPDRS part 3), quality of life (EQ-5D) and presence of active job were evaluated one and two years after the operation. Results – As far as the severity of motor symptoms were concerned, similar (approximately 50%) improvement was achieved in both groups. However, the postoperative quality of life was significantly better in the Job+ group. Majority (12/15, 80%) of Job+ group members were able to preserve their job two years after the operation. However, only a minimal portion (1/24, 4.2%) of the Job- group members was able to return to the world of active employees (p<0.01, McNemar test). Conclusion – Although our retrospective study has several limitations, our results fit well with the conclusions of “EarlyStim” study. Both of them suggest that with optimal timing of DBS implantation we may preserve the working capabilities of our patients.]

Clinical Neuroscience

[Decisional collisions between evidence and experience based medicine in care of people with epilepsy]

RAJNA Péter

[Background – Based on the literature and his long-term clinical practice the author stresses the main collisions of evidence and experience based medicine in the care of people with epilepsy. Purpose – To see, what are the professional decisions of high responsibility in the epilepsy-care, in whose the relevant clinical research is still lacking or does not give a satisfactory basis. Methods – Following the structure of the Hungarian Guideline the author points the critical situations and decisions. He explains also the causes of the dilemmas: the lack or uncertainty of evidences or the difficulty of scientific investigation of the situation. Results – There are some priorities of experience based medicine in the following areas: definition of epilepsy, classification of seizures, etiology – including genetic background –, role of precipitating and provoking factors. These are able to influence the complex diagnosis. In the pharmacotherapy the choice of the first drug and the optimal algorithm as well as the tasks during the care are also depends on personal experiences sometimes contradictory to the official recommendations. Same can occur in the choice of the non-pharmacological treatments and rehabilitation. Discussion and conclusion – Personal professional experiences (and interests of patients) must be obligatory accessories of evidence based attitude, but for achieving the optimal results, in some situations they replace the official recommendations. Therefore it is very important that the problematic patients do meet experts having necessary experiences and also professional responsibility to help in these decisions. ]