Clinical Neuroscience

[Noninvasive imaging in the diagnosis of cerebral sinus thrombosis]

MARCH 25, 2009

Clinical Neuroscience - 2009;62(03-04)

[Cerebral venous thrombosis is a severe, but potentially reversible disease, when it is promptly recognised and treated. Due to its varied and many aetiological factors and clinical manifestations, non-invasive radiological imaging plays a key role in the diagnostic procedure. Unenhanced and contrast-enhanced computer tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, CT angiography (CTA), MR angiography - such as time-of-flight (TOF) and phase-contrast (PC) angiography - are appropriate techniques for detecting cerebral venous flow and brain parenchymal changes. To achive adequate diagnosis timely it is necessary to have a correct knowledge of the venographic techniques, the temporally altering appearance of the thrombus, and the differential diagnostic problems that may occur. In our article, we summarized these characteristics by recent international publications and our own clinical observations and propose recommendations regarding the examination protocol of the dural sinus thrombosis.]

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