Clinical Neuroscience

[Left median thalamic infract and complex plasy]

VASTAGH Ildikó1, FOLYOVICH András1, ARÁNYI Zsuzsanna1, BODROGI László1, TÁRCZY Miklós1

NOVEMBER 20, 1996

Clinical Neuroscience - 1996;49(11-12)

[The authors present the case history of a 68-years­ old female patient. The patient, who is known to have hypertension, developed on the day of her admission a short lasting loss of consciousness. Upon recovery the following neurological symptoms were observed: gaze paresis upward and to the right, skew deviation, partial gaze paresis downward, slight right sided hemipares is, ataxia of the right extremities and trunk, right sided hemihypesthesia. Short neuropsychological examination disclosed a speech disorder and the disturbance of abstract thinking. CT scan of the brain showed a congenital arachnoidal cyst in the region of midline cerebellar structures, ischemic infarcts in the right cerebellar hemisphere and in the medial part of the left thala­mus. MRI in addition revealed a 2-3 mm large infarct in the mesencephalon. MR angiography showed a tortuous basilar artery. Neuro-ophthalmological examination and acoustic evoked potentials indicated a functional disturbance at the right side of the brainstem at the level of the pons and midbrain. The authors present a case with a thalamic infarct accompanied by a complex eye movement disorder and cerebellar symptoms. They wish to indicate the role of thalamic infarcts in the development of a sud­den loss of consciousness with successive neuropsy­chological disturbance and gaze palsy.]

AFFILIATIONS

  1. Semmelweis Orvostudományi Egyetem, Neurológiai Klinika, Budapest

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