Clinical Neuroscience

[Hyperglycaemic hemiballismus: implications from connectivity analysis for cognitive impairments]

KINCSES Tamás Zsigmond1,2, VADÁSZ Dávid1, NÉMETH Dezsõ3, JANACSEK Karolina3, SZABÓ Nikoletta1,2, DÉZSI Lívia1, BABOS Magor4,5, VÖRÖS Erika4, VÉCSEI László1

NOVEMBER 20, 2015

Clinical Neuroscience - 2015;68(11-12)

DOI: https://doi.org/10.18071/isz.68.417

[Hyperglycaemia induced movement disorders, such as hemiballism are rare disorders. The syndrome is characterised by the triad of hemiballism, contralateral T1-hyperintense striatal lesion and non-ketotic hyperglycaemia. Here we report a patient with untreated diabetes presenting with acute onset of hemiballism. MRI revealed T1 hyperintensity of the head of the caudate nucleus and the anterior putamen. The patient also had acantocytosis. Based on the detailed examination of the neuroradiological results and earlier findings we will imply on the pathomechanism. Based on previous findings microhemorrhages, extensive mineralisation, gemistocytic astrocytosis might play role in the development of the imaging signs. The connectivity pattern of the striatal lesion showed extensive connections to the frontal cortex. In coexistence with that the most severe impairment was found on the phonemic verbal fluency task measuring frontal executive functions. ]

AFFILIATIONS

  1. Department of Neurology, University of Szeged, Szeged, Hungary
  2. International Clinical Research Center, St. Anne’s University Hospital, Brno, Czech Republic
  3. Institute of Psychology, Eötvös Loránd University, Budapest, Hungary
  4. Department of Radiology, University of Szeged, Szeged, Hungary
  5. Euromedic Diagnostics Szeged Kft, Szeged, Hungary

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Clinical Neuroscience

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