Clinical Neuroscience

[Event-related potentials and clinical symptoms in schizophrenia]

DOMJÁN Nóra1, CSIFCSÁK Gábor2, JANKA Zoltán1

JANUARY 30, 2016

Clinical Neuroscience - 2016;69(01-02)

DOI: https://doi.org/10.18071/isz.69.0013

[The investigation of schizophrenia’s aetiology and pathomechanism is of high importance in neurosciences. In the recent decades, analyzing event-related potentials have proven to be useful to reveal the neuropsychological dysfunctions in schizophrenia. Even the very early stages of auditory stimulus processing are impaired in this disorder; this might contribute to the experience of auditory hallucinations. The present review summarizes the recent literature on the relationship between auditory hallucinations and event-related potentials. Due to the dysfunction of early auditory sensory processing, patients with schizophrenia are not able to locate the source of stimuli and to allocate their attention appropriately. These deficits might lead to auditory hallucinations and problems with daily functioning. Studies involving high risk groups may provide tools for screening and early interventions; thus improving the prognosis of schizophrenia. ]

AFFILIATIONS

  1. Szegedi Tudományegyetem, Általános Orvostudományi Kar, Pszichiátriai Klinika, Szeged
  2. Szegedi Tudományegyetem, Bölcsészettudományi Kar, Pszichológiai Intézet, Szeged

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