Clinical Neuroscience

[Current practice of antithrombotic treatment in ischemic stroke: a survey among Hungarian neurologists (in English language)]

SZTRIHA K. László1, VÉCSEI László1

MAY 30, 2008

Clinical Neuroscience - 2008;61(05-06)

[Background and purpose - Large multicenter trials have already evaluated the relative benefit of various types of antithrombotic medication in ischemic stroke. However, the application of the trial results still remains uncertain in some clinical situations. We set out to evaluate the various aspects of antithrombotic treatment use among clinical practitioners. Methods - A virtually nationwide survey was performed among Hungarian neurologists involved in stroke care, who responded to a questionnaire concerning the use of antiplatelet agents and anticoagulation in acute ischemic stroke and for secondary prevention. Results - The response rate was 65%. Most (69%) practitioners always wait for brain imaging before initiating antithrombotic treatment in acute stroke. Aspirin (100 mg/ day) is the most frequently prescribed antiplatelet agent after a first ischemic episode. Common reasons for the prescription of alternative agents instead of aspirin after a first attack include high-risk cases and intolerance or allergy to aspirin. The results of in vitro platelet aggregation studies frequently influence drug selection. If an event recurs during a given antiplatelet treatment, most neurologists change the medication. Some participants reported the administration of anticoagulation, or of the combination of aspirin plus clopidogrel in certain situations that are not cardiological indications. Conclusions - This study provides information on the use of antithrombotic treatment in general neurological practice, including everyday clinical situations where no help is available from guidelines.]

AFFILIATIONS

  1. Department of Neurology, Albert Szent-Györgyi Clinical Center, University of Szeged, Szeged

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